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The Qlass of 1932 




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WILLIAM RISBY WHITEHORNE. A.M., Ph.D. 




TH E 

Ml 151^01^ 

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o William Risby Whitehorne, 

Professor of Physics, who, 
with love and zeal, has served Bates 
faithfully for many years and showed 
to countless graduates the inspiring 
spirit of the true scientist, this 1932 
edition of the Bates Mirror is dedi- 
cated. 

Teachers of the theory of science are 
criticized for lack (jf interest in tlie 
practical, applied aspect of their knowl- 
edge. Professor Whitehorne never re- 
ceives this criticism. His process of 
color photography and his activities 
as consulting- engineer of the Maine 
Central Railroad reveal him as a man 
who combines fine theory with skillful 
practice. Although little given to put- 
ting himself forward in any situation, 
his life is well tilled with activities out- 
side his chosen profession. His work 
in his church has been great and inspir- 
ing. 

As a teacher of men. he points the 
way of knowledge and expects the 
manhood of his pupils to urge them 
according to his guidance without 
special coercion. The senior class ex- 
presses a deserved gratefulness in 
dedicating its year book to this Bates 
personality. 





THE 

MII^I^OI^ 





3ortmovh 



®HE MIRROR BOARD presents 
this Year Book with the sincere 
hope that it will, through its 
story in picture and prose, help 
to keep alive the memories of 
the times of pleasure and of hard work, 
the sweet recollection of friendships made, 
and the thrill of activities which have filled 
this period of Bates history. And it is the 
still dearer hope of the Editors that the 
Mirror will be a tangible manifestation 
of the spirit of the more permanent 
Bates ideals — of Democracy, Culture, 
and Service. 




THE 

Ml 151^01^ 



i 



liu ■■■>>» JaiiJiKIKiall 




OIo«tfnt0 



Campus Views 


7 


Faculty 


23 


Seniors 


39 


Juniors 


91 


Sophomores 


97 


Freshmen 


101 


Student Administration 


105 


Christian Associations 


109 


Publications 


115 


Debating 


123 


Dramatics 


131 


Music 


139 


Societies 


151 


Men's Athletics 


171 


Women's Athletics 


205 


Humor 


221 


Advertisements 


233 




(It was the wish of the Editors of the 
MIRROR this year that a Maine \Voods art 
theme, well in \eeping with the outstanding 
natural beauty of the Bates campus, be carried 
out in the pages of the 1932 AnnuaJ. They 
wish to express their deep gratitude to Ran- 
dolph Weatherbee. 'i2 and to Elizabeth Lord, 
'a, through whose hard wor}{ and s\ill in 
creative e^ort this aim has been accomplished. 
They also wish to express appreciation to 
the members of their Mirror Board and to the 
many other people whose interest in the boo}{ 
and whose suggestions have helped them.) 




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CLIFTON DAGGETT GRAY, Ph.D.. LL.D. 

Born at Somerville. Mass., |ulv 27. 1874; A.B.. Harvard, 
1897; A.M., 1898; B.I).. Newton" Theological Institution, 1899; 
S.T.B., University of Chicago, 1900; Ph.D., 1901 ; LL.D., Uni- 
versity of Maine, 1922; Research Work in British Museum, 
1900; Pastor of First Baptist Church, Port Huron, Micliigan, 
1901-05; Pastor of Stoughton Street Church. Boston, 1905-12; 
Editor of "The vStandard", Chicago, 1912-19; President of 
Bates College since 1920; Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Kappa Phi; 
Trustee of Newton Theological Institution ; University Club, 
Boston ; Harvard Club. New York ; Honorary Associate Secre- 
tary, Baptist World Alliance. 



PAGE TWENTY FOUR 




Mimloc^ 

— ^ ; 1932? ■ ^ ' 



I 



^f^^ »t)i ^mMHtH-i 







HAZEL M. CLARK, A.M. 

Born at Warsaw, New York, March 29, 1895; Warsaw 
lli.^h School 1911; University of Rochester. A.B., 1915; Col- 
umbia University Summer School, 1920; Columbia University 
A.M., 1926; Instructor in Latin and History in High Schools 
of New York State; Binghamton Central High School, 1921- 
25; Assistant in Department of Deans of Women, Columbia 
University Summer Session, 1926; Dean of Women and 
Instructor in Education, Frostl)urg State Normal School, 
Frostlnirg-, Md., 1926-28; Dean of Women, Bates College, 
since 1928; Phi Beta Kappa; Kappa Delta Pi. 



PAGE TWENTY-FIVE 




THE 



I V I I 1^. r^ v^ r^ M i.iiiiiMiiiff 



Q32 







HERBERT RONELLE PURINTON, 

"Pussy" 



A.M. . D.D. 



P.oin at Bowdoinliam, Maiiif, (October IS, 18fi7; Colby, ISfll: 
StudPiit at Newton Theological .Seminary, 18!)l-!)2: Cobb Divinity 
Srhool, 18tt4-!lli; Graduate Stvidy at University of Chieagd, 18iU;; 
I'i(jfessor of Hebrew and Old Testament Interpretation, Cobl) 
Divinity Scho<d, lS!l(i-190S; D.])., Hillsdale College, 1907; rrofes.sor 
of Biblical Literature and Religion at Bates College since 1908; 
Preacher, Teacher, Lectuiei'; Traveled in Palestine, 1924; Author, 
"Literature of the Old Testament"; "Literature of the New Testa- 
ment"; "Achievement of the Mastei" (in collaboration with Sadie 
I!. Costello) ; "Achievement of Israel"; Leave of Absence, 19.'i0-31. 




GROSVENOR MAY ROBINSON, A.M. 

"Prof Rob" 

"It was most exquisitely done." 

Born at Boston, Mass., December 13, 1867; Graduated from 
School of Expression, Teacher's Course, 1890; Artistic Diploma. 
1S91; Taught at School of E.xpi'ession, Newton Theological School, 
Yale Divinity School, 1894-1907; Piofessor of Public Speaking 
since 1907; Trustee of Boston School of Expression, 1921-24; 
Traveled abroad summers of 1924-31. 



ARTHUR NEWTON LEONARD, 
"Dutchy" 



A.M.. Ph.D. 



"1 don't want to embarrass you Mr. ." 

Born at Brooklyn. N. Y., September 27, 1870; Blown Univei'sitv, 
1892; Phi Beta Kappa; Appointed to G. A. R. Fellowship, 189.3-94; 
A.M., 1893; I'h.D.. 1894; Instructor at Brown ITniversity, 1892-94; 
Studied in Germany, 1894-9.'); Professor of German at Jolin B. 
Stetson PTniversity, Floiida, 189.'i-9fi; Fairmount College, Kansas, 
1896-99; Instructoi' of French, Bates College, 1890-1901; Studied 
in Germany, 1907-08; and Second Semester, 1926; Co-author of 
Ham and Leonaid's "Brief German Grammar"; Editor of Riehl's 
"Der Fluch dei' Schiinhei t", and of Baumback's "Die Nonna"; Pro- 
fessoi' of German, Bates College, since 1901. 



FRED AUSTIN KNAPP. A.M. 

"Freddy" 

"Love is the biggest thing in life." 

Born at Haverhill, llass., December 9, 1872; Instructor in Latin 
and Mathematics at Nichols Latin .School, and Assistant in Chem- 
istry and Physics at Bates College, 1896-97; Instructor in E'nglish 
and Latin, Bates College, 1898-1901; Graduate Work at Harvard, 
1901-03; Professor of Latin at Iiates College since 1903; on Leave 
of Absence, 1910-11; Phi Beta Kappa. 



PAGE TWENTY-SIX 




THE 



Mmi^OI^ 



932 



FRED ELMER POMEROY, A.M., Sc.D. 
"I'om" 

"Now tlifre are some people on the faculty who think that - - 
but 1 don't." 

Born at Lewiston, Maine, Marcli (i, 1877: Ijewiston High School; 
Bates College, ISit'l; Assistant in Cliemisti'y, 189H-l!tO(l; Instructor 
in Botany, 1900-01; Giaduate Woik at Harvard, 1901-02; I'ro- 
fessor of Biology at Bates since 1902; Graduate Work at Har- 
vard and M. 1. T., 1913-14; Phi Beta Kapi)a: IJean of .Men, 1922-2<;: 
Study at Coluinbia, 192G-27; Professor of Biology at Bates since 
1927. 




HALBERT HAINES BRITAN. A.M.. Ph.D. 

"J).JC" 

"Who's better <:)ff. me or my dog?" 

Born at Bethlehem, Indiana, October S, 1874; Hanover College, 
Tnd., 1898; Teacher, Kentucky, 1898-99; Graduate Student, Yale, 
1900; Scholaiship at Vale, 1900; Contributor to I'liilosophical 
Review, I'sychological Review, International Journal of Ethics; 
Fellowship, Yale, 1900-02; Student at Yale and Teachei- at New 
Haven, 1902-03. I'rincipal of Reynolds Academy, 1904-0.'j; Instruc- 
tor of Philosophy, Bates College, 190.S-07; Author of "Philosopliy 
of Music"; Translator of Descarte's "Principles of Philosophy", 
by Spinoza; Author, "The Effective Consciousness". 1931; Piofes- 
sor of Philosophy, Bales College, since 1907; Author of numerous 
magazine articles on philosophy and ethics. 




GEORGE MILLET CHASE. A.M. 



"But Bates boys and girls were good boys and girls." 

Born at Lewiston, Maine, April 17, 1873; Lewiston High School, 
1889; Bates College, 1893; Cobb Divinity School, 1897-98; Y'ale. 
1898-1901; Instructor at Y'ale, 1900-01; Professor of Classics, Amer- 
ican International College, Spiingfleld, 1901-06; Professor of Greek 
Language and Literature at Bates College since 190(); Traveled 
and studied in Greece, 1923; Autlior of "Questions and Topics on 
Greek and Roman Statesmanship", "George Colby Chase"; Phi 
Beta Kappa; American Philological Association. 




WILLIAM RISBY WHITEHORNE. A.M.. Ph.D. 

"Willie" 

Born at Kingston, Jamaica, W'est Indies, Febiuaiy 9, 1873; 
Somerville High School, Mass; A.B.. Tufts College, lS9r5; Univer- 
sity School, I'rovidence, R. I.; Muhlenburg College, Penn., 1902-04; 
Instructor, Lehigh University, 1904-Ofi; South Bethlehem, Penna.; 
Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, 190f)-07; Delta Tau Delta; Phi Beta 
Kappa; Ameiican Physical Society; Fellow of the Ameiican Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of Science; Professor of Physics at 
Bates since 1907. 




PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN 



THE 



Mm[^0(^ 






932 







GEORGE EDWIN RAMSDELL, 

"rnclf Gt'Di'Kc" 



A.M. 



r.or-n at 'I'urinr, Maine, AjM-il 1, IXTfi; Hates College, 1903; 
TaiiKlU at Maine ('('iitrai In.stitute, l!(04-0.'.: A.M., Graduate Work 
at Harvard, lll(l(i-07: Professor of Mathematics at Bates College 
since 1IHI7; I'lii lieta Kappa. 




R. R. N. GOULD, A.M. 

"fa" 

"Of course, I'm a Socialist, you know." 

University of Michigan, 1001; I'lincipal of lOlementary Schools, 
Bay City and Saginaw, .Midi.; I'rincipal of Kalamazoo High 
School, Mich.; A.M., Columbia, l!ill; I'lofessor of History and 
Government at Bates since Hill; Faculty Adviser of Politics 
(Nuhs; Director of Bates Summer School, 1922-2(1. 




JOHN MURRAY CARROLL, A.M. 

".J. Mvirray" 

"Now I don't know but we've spent too mucli time on this point." 

Boin at Washington, Maine, January 11, 1SS2; Kent's Hill 
Seminary, 1904; Bates College, 1909; Assistant in Argumentation 
at Bates, 1908-09; Instructor in English Composition and Argu- 
mentation, Bates. 1909-12; Graduate Work at Harvard, A.M., 1914; 
Professor of Economics at Batis since 1914; Phi Beta Kappa; IJelta 
Sigma Rho; Faculty Member (jI' tlie Bates Politics Club; Treasuier 
of Bates Debating Council; Liave of Absence, Second Semester 
1931-32. 




ROBERT A. 



Mcdonald, a.m., ph.d. 

".Mac" 



"Would you suspect it?" 

Born at Winnipeg, Canada, October 4. 1878; McMaster Univer- 
sity, Toronto, A.B., 1904; A.M., 1908; Specialist Certificate, Ontario 
Normal College, Hamilton, 190.1; Teacher of Latin and Greeli. 
Woodstock College, Woodstock. Ontario, 190,')-13; Associate Exam- 
iner, Ontario Department of lOducation, Toronto, 1907-09; Grad- 
uate Student in E'ducation and Sociolog.v, Columbia University, 
1913-1.5; Ph.D., Columbia, 191.'); Member American Association for 
the Advancement of Science, Phi Delta Kappa, National Society 
for the Study of Education, National lOducation Association; Pro- 
fessor of Education at Bati'S since IMl.^; Directoi' of Bates Summer 
Session, 1919-22; Directoi' N'ocational Counsel and Placement Sei- 
vice since 1930. 



PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT 




TH E 

' - ' 19 32 ■ 



WALTER ALBERT LAWRANCE, 

"D(jc" 



A.M., PH.D., F.C.S. 



"Tellya- wliata-do — S'matter of fact." 

Born at Pimlico Hert.s, England; A.B., 191f), McMaster Univer- 
sity. Toronto; A.M., Ph.D., University of Toronto. 1921; Scientific 
Warfare Sei'vice, 1916-17; Dominion Researcli Fellow, 1918-21; 
Assistant Professor, McMaster University; Member Chemical Soci- 
ety, Chemical Society Great Biitain, Canadian Institute of Chem- 
istry, Society of Chemical Industiy; Author of Seveial Original 
Researches in Organic and Industiial Chemistry; Professor of 
Chemistry at Bates College since 1921. 




SAMUEL FREDERICK HARMS, A.M. 

"Sammy" 

"We-e-1-1, folks!" 

Born at Norwood, Minnesota, April 12, 1884; University of Min- 
nesota, A.B., 1909; Harvard, A.M., 1910; University of Michigan 
Summei- School, 1911; Instiuctor in German at Bates, 1910-14; 




OLIVER FROST CUTTS, A.B. 

"Ollie" 

"Isn't that it, men?" 



LL.B. 



Born at North Anson, Maine, August ,5, 1873; A.B., Bates Col- 
lege, 1896; Teacher of Mathematics, Haverford College Grammar 
School, 1896-1900; L.L.B., Harvard Law School, 190.3; Coach and 
Athletic Director, Puidue University, 1903-05; Football Coach, 
Univei'sity of Washington, 1905; Practiced Law, Seattle, 1906-11; 
International Committee Y. M. C. A., 1911-14; Head of Buhl Club 
and Secretary Civic Association, Sharon, Penna., 1914; Head of 
Department of Physical Education, Puidue University, 1915-19; 
in Business, Philadelphia, 1919-22; Professor of Hygiene and Phy- 
sical Education in Bates since 1922. 




EDWIN MINER WRIGHT, A.M., 

"Eddie" 



Ph.D. 



"Just browse around in this foi' a while." 

Born at Weedsport, New York. April 18. 1887; A.B., Colgate 
University; A.M.. Ph.D.. Harvard Univeisity; Instructor at East 
High School. Rochester. N. Y.; University of Rochester; Harvard 
University; Phi Beta Kappa. Delta Upsilon; Professor of English 
Literature and Head of English Department at Bates College 
since 1926. 




PAGE TWENTY-NINE 




THE 



Mmi^OI^ 



932 



- .^J4UU: 





LENA WALMSLEY. 



A.M. 



"I'd lil;c to inakt> a sugKi'Mtion." 

Boin at Fall River, Mas.s., April 2<S, 18(17; Durfee Hig-h School. 
1915; Bridgewater Normal. l!)ir)-18; Tauprht at Quincy. Mass., 7th 
Grade, 1918-20; Bo.ston, Posse Nissen School of Physical Educa- 
tion, 1920-21; Quincy High School, 1921-2.5; Columbia, A.M., 1927; 
Piofessor, Hygiene and Physical Education for AVomen, Bates, 
.since 1927; Instructor, Physical Education, Bati'.s Summer Session, 
1929. 




BLANCHE ETTA GILBERT, A.B., A.M. 

"Is that the way a lU'^.M, student would do it?" 

Born at Lynn, JIass., November 14. 1874; Farmington, N H 
High School; Salem, Mass., Normal School; A.B., Bates Colleg-e; 
A.M., Hillsdale College: Special Student at Boston University' 
Radcliffe College, Middlebury College, Universitv of Geneva, Soi"-- 
bonne. University of Paiis. Harvard School of Education. Diplomee 
of Alliance Francaise; Instructoi', Latin High School, Cambridge, 
Mass., for ten years: Instructor and Assistant I'rofessor in French, 
Bates, 1924-2(); Acting Head of French Department, 192fi-27- 
Studied at Sorbonne, 1927-28; Head of French Department since 
1928; Diplomee de la Soibonne Universite de Paris. 




WILLIAM HAYES SAWYER, JR.. A.M., Ph.D. 
"Bill" 

"That will lool< diiTcii-iit under the high jiower." 

Boi'n in Limingt(ui, Maine, February 4. 1892; Limington .\cad- 
emy; Bates College, 191.3; A.M., Coinell University, 191(1; Ph.D., 
Harvard University, 1929; Instructor in Biology, Bates College, 
1913-22; with the American E.\peditionaiy Foices in Fiance, 1918- 
19; Assistant Professor of Biology, I3ates College, 1922-27: Grad- 
uate woik. Harvard Universitv, 1927-29; Instructor in Botany, 
Radcliffe College; Instiuctor in Biology, .M. 1. T., 1928-29; Profes- 
sor of Botany, Bates College, since 1929; Sigma Xi; Phi Beta 
Kappa; American .\ssocialion for the .Advancement of Science; 
Pntanieal .Society of America. 




DAVID BEALE MOREY. A.B. 

"Dave" 

Born at Maiden. Mass., February 25. 1889; i\lal(l(-n High School. 
i;)09; A.B., Dartmouth College, 19i:i; Director of .Vtlilelics and 
Head Coach of Football at .\l iddlelmry, 1920-25: Assistant Coach 
at Dartmouth; Director of .\thletics and Head Coach of footl)all 
and baseball at Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1925-27; Graduate 
Study and Instiuctor in Phvsiologv of Exercise at New York Uni- 
versity, 1928-29; Head Coach of Football, Baseball, and Hockey, 
and Instructor in Physical Education at Bates College .•^ince 1929. 



PAGE THIRTY 




THE 



- ^ 11932 






KARL STANLEY WOODCOCK, M.S. 

"Karl" 

"I like to tell these little stories." 

Born at Thoinaston, Maine, May 11, 1895; Thomaston High 
School. 1914; B.S., Bates College, 1918; Phi Beta Kappa; M. I. T. 
Summer Session, 1918; Instructor in Physics and Mathematics at 
Bates, 1918-23; M.S., University of Chicago, 1922; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Physics at Bates since 1923; Leave of Absence, 1929-30. 




ANDERS MATTSON MYHRMAN. A.M. 

"Andy" 

"Well, yes, that is near'ly rig'ht, but has someone got a better 
answer?" 

Born at Purmo, Finland, May 19, 1888; Adelphia Academy, 
Seattle, Washington; University of Washington and University of 
Minnesota, A.B., 1920; Phi Beta Kappa; Alpha Lambda Psi; Uni- 
versity of Chicago and University of Pennsylvania, A.M., 1924; 
Instructor, Adelphia Academy, High School, Felch, Michigan, 1921- 
22; and High School, Altoona, Penna., 1924-2.'i: Assistant Profes- 
sor in the Depaitment of Economics and Sociology, Bates College, 
since 1925. 




AMOS ARNOLD HOVEY, A.M., B.D., Ph.D. 

"Uncle Amos" 

"That's a question for philosophy." 

Born at Ludlow, N. B., Canada. August 10. 1883; Acadia LTni- 
versity, N. S., A.B.. 1914; Colgate University. B.D.. 1918; Studied 
Sociology in New York City; Professor of Social Sciences, Fargo 
College, N. D., 1920-21; Assistant Professor of Sociology, Univer- 
sity of North Dakota Summei- Session, 1921; Associate Professor 
of Histoi-y, Kalamazoo College, Michigan. 1921-22; Graduate Stu- 
dent, University of Chicago. 1922-26: University of Chicago, A.M., 
1923, Ph.D., 1930; Assistant Professor of History, Bates College, 
since 1926. 




BROOKS QUIMBY, A.B. 

"Brooks" 



A.M. 



"After you have read those books, we'll talk over the question." 

Born at Turner, Maine, February 18. 1897; Deavitt Institute; 
Bates College, A.B., 1918; A.M., Haivard, 1931; Phi Beta Kappa; 
Delta Sigma Rho; First Lieutenant, F. A.; Graduate Work at Har- 
vard University; Insti'uctor in High School, Hartford, Conn., 1919; 
Dean Academy, 1920; Head of Department of History, Deering 
High School, Portland. 1922-27; Assistant Professor of Argumen- 
tation and Public Speaking at Bates College; Debating Coach at 
Bates College, since 1927. 




PAGE THIRTY-ONE 




THE 



19 32^'^- 





PERCY DESMOND WILKINS. 

••rcicv" 



M.S. 



"Now you don't need a sledge hammer to crack a peanut." 

Born at Hardwick, Veimont. March 12, 1900; Foxcroft Acad- 
emy, Foxcioft, Maine, 1917; Bowdoin ("ollepre, A.B., 1921; In.stiuc- 
tor in Matlieniatics, Tufts College, 1921-2,5; Student at Harvard 
Graduate School, 1924-2.5; Student at Case School of Applied Sci- 
ence. 192.')-27; Instructoi' in Mathematics at Case School of Apjilied 
Science, 1925-27; Case School, M.S., 1927; Assistant I'rofessoi- of 
Mathematics, Bates College, since 1927; Member Aineiican ]\Iathe- 
niatical Association and Zeta Psi Fraternity. 




ANGELO PHILIP BERTOCCI. A.M. 

■■Anst I" 

"What this countr.v needs is a cultured minority." 

Born at Gaeta, Italy, May, 1907; Somerville High SchoQl, Mas- 
sachusetts, in 1923; A.B. at Boston University, 1927; Phi Beta 
Kappa; A.M. at Harvard, 192S; Traveled and studied art in Europe, 
Palestine, and Egypt, as Fellow of Boston University, 1928-29; 
University of Grenoble, France, 1928-29: Diplome de Hautes 
Ktudes I^rancaises; Instructor of French at Bates, since 19S0, 




ROBERT GEORGE BERK.ELMAN, A.M. 
"Bobbie" 

"A student's notes are the index of his mind." 

Born at Duluth, Minn., June 29, 1900; IJuluth Central High 
School; Lawrence College, Applett)n, AVis., B.A., 1923; I'hi Beta 
Kappa: ]'i Delta Epsilon; Instructoi-, Appleton High School, 192;J- 
24; Instructor in English, Bates College, 1924-26; Yale University, 
A.M., 1927; Graduate Student, Columbia University Summer Ses- 
sion 1927; Harvard .SuiTimi i- Session, 1928: Instructor in English, 
Bates College, 1927-28; Assistant Professor in English, Bates Col- 
lege, since 1928. 



LLOYD WELLINGTON FISHER. M.S. 
•Bud" 



PH.D. 



"So tiie wind blew and made the trees rock." 

F.oin in Reading, Penna., Febru.'iiy 1.5, 1897; Reading High 
School; Lehigh Universitv, A.B., 1921; Penna. State College, .M.S.. 
192;i; The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, PhD. 
1929; Instiuctor in Geology at Blown LIniversity, 192:^-27: Teach- 
ing fellow, Penna. State College, 1921-22: Instructoi- in Minorol- 
og.v, Syracuse University, 1922-2:J; Author of several articles in 
the tield of geology; Member Minerological Society of America; 
Gamma Alpha; Sigma Xi, I'enna. Academy of Science; R. I. F'ield 
Naturalists; I'rofessor in Geology at Bates since 1929. 



PAGE THIRTY-TWO 




THE 



Mmc^oi^ 



932 






CLINTON RAY THOMPSON, 

••Ray" 



A.B. 



"That will be all fur today. Now jog^ six laps." 

Born at Lewistoii, Maine, November 1, 1890; Lewiston High 
School; Bates Colleg-e, A.B., 1913; Graduate Student at Columbia 
University; Instr-uctor in History and Coach of Athletics, Tilton 
School, Tilton, N. H., 191.3-14; Coach of Athletics, Moses Brown 
School, Piovidence, R. I., 1914-15; Cony High Schol, Augusta, 
Maine, 1915-25; Instructor in History, Fieshman Athletic Coach, 
Winter Sports Coach, Bates College, 1925-28; Director of Track, 
Athletics and Winter Sports Coach, Bates College since 1928. 




KATHLEEN 



ELISABETH SANDERS 

••Kay" 



"B--r--r--r, it's cold!" 

Born at Georgetown, Mass.; graduated from Bradford Academy, 
1926; graduated from Russell Sag-e College School oi' Physical 
Education and Hygiene, 1929; Student Instructor at Elmira College 
in 1929-30; New Yoi'k University Summer Camp, 1930; Instiuctor 
of Physical Education at Bates since 1930. 




SELDON TUPPER CRAFTS 

"Seldom" 

"Retire to your stalls." 

Born at Amherst, Nova Scotia, November 3, 187fi; Studied with 
E. W. Hanscom, Auburn, Prank L,. Rankin, Portland, Everette 
Truette and George Lowell Tracy, Boston; Organist, State Sti'eet 
Church, Portland; Conductor of Portland and Lewiston Festival 
Choruses for many years; Teacher of Piano and Organ; Director 
of Music, Bates College, since 1925. 




RAYBORN LINDLEY ZERBY, Ph.D. 

'•It isn't -what you think, but that you think." 

Born at Coldwater, Kansas, June 7, 1892; Illinois State Noi'mal 
University, Summer 1910 and 1912; Eureka College, A.B., 191ti; 
Graduate Student, University of Illinois, Summer 1916; Divinity 
School, LTniveisity of Chicago, D.B., 1927; Univei'sity of Chicago, 
Ph.D.. 1920; High School Teacher, 1916-18; Pastor, Glen Park 
Christian Church, Gary, Indiana, 1918-22; Student Pastor, Com- 
munity Church, New Carlisle, Indiana, 1922-28; Fellow in Theol- 
ogy, University of Chicago, and Student Pastor, Edgebrook Com- 
munity Church, Chicago, 1928-30; Professor of Biblical Literature 
at Bates since 1930. 




PAGE THIRTY-THREE 




~- ■ - - 1932 ■ ' - 





FRED C. 



MABEE. A.M. 

"I 'I'liiap.s" 



Ph.D. 



"Now, fellow.';, FELLOWS, not .so imich noi.sc in the laboratory." 

Born at Cittoria, Ontario, Canada, lS8.'i; McMa.ster lliii veisity, 
A.M., 1925; Ph.D., 1927, Columbia University; Re.seai'ch A.s.si.stant 
in Phy.sical Chemistry, Mas.*. Institute of Technology, 190G-07; 
.\ustin Teaching: Fellow, Harvard University, 1908-09; Professor 
of Chemistry, Mt. Union College, Alliance, Ontario, 1909-10; T'lo- 
I'essor of Ciieinistry, Shanghai College, Shanghai, China, 1910-24; 
Professor of (^hemistry. State Teachers College, Harrisonburg, 
\'irginia, 1927-30; Professor of Cheniistrv at Bates since 1930. 




PAUL WHITBECK. 

"W'llittie" 



A. 8. 



"Will you discuss this topic, ;\lr. — ?" 

Born at AltaiTiont, N. V., Febru;n\' C. 1S99; llaniillon Collcg.-, 
A.B,, 1921: Columbia University. A..M.. i;i2S: Alpha Delta Phi; 
Insti-uctor in lOnglish. Kates College, since 192,S. 




WALTER GRANT STEWART. A.M. 

"Aesop" 

"All you fellows have got to do is use your head." 

Boin at Los Angeles, California, June 18, 190C; Mass. Alpha 
Chapter (jf Theta Kappa Nu; A.B., 1929, Clark University; Student 
Assistant in Chemistry, 1929-30; M.A., Clark University, 1930; 
Instructor of I'hemistry at Bates, since 1930. 




PAUL BURROUGHS BARTLETT, A.B., A.M. 

"Sleepy Joe" 

"When T was in the army." 

Boi-n at Crinnell, Iowa. April l.^i, 1S92; Orinnell College, A.B. 
and A.M.; University of Iowa, Gi'aduate Study; A.IO.F. in 1918; 
Superintendent of Schools for .'i yeais in Iowa towns; I'rofessor of 
Economics and Business Administiation Ti years at Huron College, 
South l.)akota; Professor, P>usiness Economics, Bates College, since 
1930. 



PAGE THIRTY-FOUR 




THE 



- ^ i 1932 



^xJl^ 



LESLIE W. SPINKS. 

•T.uck" 



B.S. 



"Maine may be all iikIiI — but tlicre are only two seasons, win- 
ter and tlie 4th of July." 

Born in Thoniasville, Alabama, July 1, 1903; Thomasville High 
School; B.S., Alabama Polytechnic, 1926; Assistant Coach in foot- 
ball and freshman basketball, Aubui-n, Alabama, 1927-28; Member, 
Sigma Phi Sigma fraternity and "A" Club at Alabama Poly- 
technic; Assistant Coach in Football, Baseball, and Hockey at 
Bates College since 1929. 




MIRIAM BENTLEY MABEE. A.M. 

"Don't you think .■^oV" 

P.orn at Central Falls, Rhode Island: l^adcliffe College, 1909; 
Instructor of English and Bible at Shanghai College, Shanghai. 
China, 191,5-24; Instructor oC Englisli at State Teachers College, 
Harrisonburg, ^'a., 1927-30; A.M. degree from Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1929; Instructor of English at Bates since 
1930. 




HOWELL LEWIS. A.M. 

"Bud" 

"In my experiment on chicks — " 

Horn at Rochester, N. Y., September 7, 1906; Graduated from 
the College of Emporia, Kansas, 1927; A.M. degree from tlie Ilni- 
versity of Kansas; Instructor in Psychology at Bates since 1930. 




ERICH LABOUVIE. A.M. 

"What means this?" 

Born at Dillengen Saar, Germany, Febiuary 2, 1909: Graduate 
of the Real Gymnasium at Dillengen Saar; Studied in Freiburg 
and Vienna; Middlebury College, leaching fellowship under the 
auspices of the Institute of International Education, 1930-31; In- 
structor in Middlebury Summer Session, 1931; A.M. Middlebury 
1931; Instructor of German at Bates, 1931-32. 




PAGE THIRTY-FIVE 




5 — ^ 1932 




'^: itfUrtiitil II 1>: 




ROBERT D. SEWARD, A.M. 

•■I'.dli" 

I?orn at Salt Lake City, Utali, .Juno 2:,, 1!)(I0; A. 13. from Kala- 
mazoo ("ollogo, Kalamazoo, Michigan, in 1!I21: Graduate Work at 
Stet.son University, Deland, Florida, 1922; Studied in France, 1923; 
In.stiuctor of lOnRlish in T'ortugal in 1924; Instructor in Elg-in 
Academy, Klgin, lllinoi.,*. Tulane University, New Orleans. La., 
and in St. Stephen's Colleg-e, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York; 
M.A. from Tulane University in 1927; Giaduate Work at Princeton 
and at Columbia University; Instructor of French at Bates since 
1930. 




HARRY WILLISON ROWE, A.B. 
•■JIarry-' 

"How arc youi' marks, Jlr. — ?" 

Corn at Mercer, Maine, November 13, 1887; Maine Central Insti- 
tute, 19n(i; Principal. Troy High School, 190fi-08; Pastor, Free 
Uaptist Chuich, Lisbon Falls, 1908-11; Bates. A.B., 1912; Field 
Secretary, Maine Christian Endeavor Union, 1912-14; Field Secre- 
tary, Northern N. E.. 1914; Member of the Executive Committee, 
Maine C. E. Union, 1912-20; Graduate Secretary, Bates Y. M. C. A., 
1914-20; Bursar, Bates College. 1920-28; Alumni Secretary, 1920 — ; 
Assistant to the President, 1924 — ; Secretary. Alumni Association, 
Bates College. 1925 — ; Phi Beta Kappa; Delta Sigma Kho; Uni- 
versity Club, Boston; Rotary. 



MABEL LOIS LIBBY, A.B. 

"Hulebook" 

"I'll look that up for you." 

Born at Swampscott. Mass., March 14, 1S96; Edward Little 
High School, 1914; Bates College, 1918; High School Assistant, 
IHradford Academy, Bradford, Vermont, 1918-20; High School 
Assistant, Stephens High School, Rumford, Maine, 1920-21; Maine 
School of Commerce, 1922; Assistant to Registrar- and Secretary 
to Dean of Women. Bates College, 1922-26; Acting Registrar, 
1926-28; Registrar-, since 1928. 




BLANCHE WHITTUM ROBERTS. A.B. 

"The Mrs." 

"Did you ever!" 

Born in Lewiston, Maine, January 2, 1879; Lewiston High 
School, 18915; Bates College, 1899; Assistant at Kittery, 1898-99; 
Student at Amherst Summer- School, 1904; Forbes Summer Library 
School, 190(i; Assistant Librarian, Coram Library, Bates. 1903-09; 
Student at Simrrrons Sunrrrrer Library School, 1909; Librarian, 
Coram Library, Bates College, since 1909; Librarian at Bates Col- 
lege Summer School, 1919-29 and 1931. 



PAGE THIRTY-SIX 




THE 



MIRQOI^ 



932 






MABEL EATON. A.B., B.S. 

"Speedy" 

"By gum, I'll dii it." 

Born at Oakland, Maine, September 16, 1SS7; Edward Little 
High School; Bates College, 1910; Simmons College, B.S., 1912; 
Cataloguer at University of Chicago Library, 1912-13; Williains 
College Library, 191.3-14; Assistant Librarian, Auburn Public 
Library, 1914-19; Instructor in French and English, Auburn, 1919- 
20; Assistant, Coram Library, Bates College, since 1921; Assistant 
Librarian and Social Director, Bates Summer Session, 1929 and 
1931; Librarian and Social Director, Bates Summer Session, 1930. 




ELSIE LOUISE MOWRY, A.B.. B.S. 

"Have you looked in the catalogue?" 

Born at North Smithfield, Rhode Island, August 13. 1903; Woon- 
socket, Rhode Island, High School; Bates 192.5; B.S. degree from 
Columbia Library School, 1930; Library Assistant at Bates since 
1930. 




DORA ETTA ROBERTS. 
"Ma" 



A.B. 



"The average middle class home does not have this variety." 

Born at Milton. N. H., April 22. 1872; Bates College, 1895; In- 
structor in Secondary Schools, 1895-190."); Massachusetts Genei'al 
Hospital, 1905-14; Simmons, Institutional Management Course, 
1915; Superintendent, Home for Aged Women. Boston. 1915-23; 
Director of Residences for Women. Bates College. 1923-28; Dieti- 
tian since 1928. 




NORMAN ERNEST ROSS, B.S. 

"\'arnish" 

"There's a vyindow open — " 

Born at Kennebunkport, Maine. August 7, 1898; Biddeford High 
School, 1917; Bates College, 1922; Instructor in Science and Coach 
of Athletics, Brandon, Vt., 1922-24; Assistant Bursar, Bates Col- 
lege, 1924-28; Bursar. Bates College, since 1928. 




PAGE THtRTY-SEVEN 




THE 



^ t I ^ IQ32 





JEAN Y. SCOTT. R. 

■■Seott\" 



N. 



•J)( 



your no.so run ; 



Horn in Leominster, Massachusetts; Graduated from Hallowell 
Hiph School, Hallowell, Maine, 192'); and from Central Maine 
General Hospital, Lewiston. Maine, 1927; Private Duty Nursing 
in Lewiston; Substitute Rod Cross Nursing in Brunswick, IVIaine, 
and Saco. Maine. 




MILDRED LEAH CHILDS 

"Is this a system 1" 

Born at Lee, Maine, May 28, 1900; Lee Academy, Bliss Business 
College; Secretary to Dr. Royal Storrs Haynes, New York City; 
Secretary to President Clifton D. Gray, 1927- . 




RACHEL ALICE METCALFE. R.N. 

■•Mctty" 

"Is everything- all right?" 

Born at .Manchester, England; Trained at Worcester City 
Hospital, Worcester, Mass.; Superintendent of Nurses, Worcester 
City Hospital, 1892-1903; Supei-intendent of Training School, 
(Grange Memorial Hospital, Orange, N. J., 1904-Ofi; Summer Camp 
Hospital, Worcester, 190(1; Superintendent of Hospital and Train- 
ing School, Central Maine General, 190H-27; Leave of Absence, 
1927; Director of licsidenccs. Bates College, since 192,S. 



PAGE THIRTY-EIGHT 




PAGE THIRTY- NINE 




Mimloi^ 

^ ? n 1932 





CLASS OFFICERS, 1932 



President. Randolph A. W'katherbee 

I'icc-prcsidciit. Julia A. Briggs 

Secretary. Alice E. HelliEr 

Treasurer. Parker AIann 

1931 

President. Randolph A. Weatherbee 

I'ice-presidcnt, Frances M. Cronin 

Secretary, Alice E. HelliER 

Treasurer. Dana S. Williams 

1930 

President. Benjamin F. White 

J'icc-prcsidciit, Dorothy H. Lawless 

Secretary. Margaret E. HinES 

Treasurer. Xorman E. Whitten 

1929 

P)esident, Randolph A. WeaTherbee 

I'icc-prcsident, Caroline L. Woodman 

Secretary, Dorothy H. Lawless 

Treasurer, Nathan A. Bucknam 



PAGE FORTY 








SHIRUIE ELIZABETH AUSTIN. A.B. 

Lawrence, Mass. 

"Wearing- all that weight of learning- 
Lightly, like a flower — " 

Born November 15, 1909: Lawrence High School; 
Y. \V. C. A. 1, 2. 3, 4; Phil-Hellenic 3, 4; Sodalitas 
Latina 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Scholarship Prize 1, 2; I'hi Beta Kappa. 

Shirlie is an unassuming little lady but always 
friendly. She is a real scholar and we don't see where 
she gets all the time to go to all the movies in town. 
That's efliciency for you I 



ROBERT H. AXTELL. B.S. 

Gatun, Canal Zone 

"Can't cater to 'em." 

Born November 5, 1911: Cristobal High School; 
Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Jordan Scientific 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 
2, 3, 4; Orphic Society 1, 2. 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1. 2, 3, 4; 
Phi Beta Kappa. 

Folks, meet the designer, builder and operator of 
Bates' first broadcasting station. Besides his duties 
as student and musician Ax has found time to con- 
struct a short wave broadcasting set with which he 
has sent the name of Bates to many distant countries. 
More voltage to him! 



MARGARET STUART BAKEMAN. A.B. 

Maiden, Mass. 

"For she was jes' the quiet Ivind 
Whose nature's never vary." 

Born January 3, 1911; Granville, Ohio, High School; 
Y. W. C. A. 3, 4; Bates Student 4; Outing Club 3, 4. 

Margaret has kept her light under a bushel dur- 
ing her two years at Bates, but a few of us have 
learned of her talent for writing clever essays. 



RUTH ELIZABETH BARRELL. A.B. 

Auburn, Me. 

"Genteel in Personage, 
Conduct and Equipage." 

Born October 22. 1910; Edward Little High School; 
Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Macfarlane 2, 3, 4; La Petite 
Academie 3, 4; Lambda Alpha 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2. 
3, 4; Assistant in Geology 4. 

Ruth can play the piano better than most of us 
ever hope to. We envy her her talent and her dry 
humor, though this last is a tieat reserved for those 
who know her best. 





mm^ 



PAGE FORTY-ONE 






THE 



MIPC^OI^ 



932 







WILLIAM BENJAMIN BEAN. B.S. 

Auburn, Mt. 

Born August 7, IHIO; Kdward Little High School; 
Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Beanie made an unassuming but not unproductive 
way among us. His work in the science laboratories 
kept him well liidden when on campus but the story 
is that he was much in evidence and demand as a 
shoe salesman downtown. 





4 



ALBERT BERNARD, JR., A.B. 

Auburn, Me. 

"Science distinguishes a man of honor." 

Born October 7, 1907; Hebron Academy; La Petite 
Academic 4; Jordan Scientific 3, 4, Chairman Execu- 
tive Committee; Football 1; Hockey 1, 2, 3. 

Al has tried to hide behind his moustache for four 
years, but even a beard can't conceal a good, con- 
scientious worker. 



EMILY ELIZABETH BEST, A.B. 

Thompsonville, Conn. 

"A careless song v/ith a little nonsense in it now 
and then does not misbecome a scholar." 

Born February 27, 1911; Enfield High School; La 
Petite Academy 3, 4; Phi Sigma Iota 3, 4; Ramsdell 
Scientific 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 
3. 4. 

Betty has enjoyed prowling around the labs and 
ferreting out precious information in the dusty re- 
cesses of the library. However no one more than 
Betty has enjoyed an impromptu sing or given a 
more lively and effective imitation. 



VESTA LEODINE BROWN 

South Portland, Me. 

"She doeth little kindnesses which others leave 
undone." 

Born March 4. 1909; South Portland High School; 
Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deutscher Verein 3, 4. 

Look for Vesta and you'll see Dot with her. 
^'esta's quiet thoughtfulness for others and her subtle 
humor have made her a favorite. 



PAGE FORTY-TWO 




THE 



MIQC^OI^ 



Q32 



MARION ELLA BLAKE, A.B. 

Portland, Me. 

"None knew her but to love her 
None named her but to praise." 

Born December 2, 1910; Chester (Vt.) High School; 
Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, S, 4, Membership Committee 3; Music 
Committee 4; Secretary of House Council 4; Macfar- 
lane Club 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Choir 
2, 3, 4; La Petite Academie 3, 4; Deutscher Verein 3, 4; 
Outing Club 1, 2, 3. 4; Pop Concert Committee 4. 

We were surprised at first to hear that deep alto 
voice booming- from our little Buddy but we soon 
recognized her as one of our finest singers. Buddy 
is one of our surest proofs of the saying that good 
things come in small packages. 

VIOLET ELINOR BLANCHARD, A.B. 

Stoneham. -Mass. 

"Gentle of speech, beneficent of mind." 

Born November 3. 1911; Stoneham High School; 
Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. Chairman Social Service Com- 
mittee 4; Deutscher Verein 2. 3, 4; Women's Politics 
Club 3, 4; Alethea 2. 3; Hockey 1, 2, 3; Soccer 1, 2. 3; 
Winter Sports 1, 2; Volleyball 1, 2; Baseball 3; Num- 
erals 2; Student Council for Disarmament 4; Delegate 
to State Economic Conference 3. 

Vi inanages to get a lot of work done without 
making any fuss about it. If she hits her social ser- 
vice work with the vigor with which she used to hit 
hockey balls, her success in that field is assured. We 
wonder if Caspar will interfere with a whole-hearted 
application to social work. 

MURIEL FRANCES BLISS. A.B. 

Attleboro, JIass. 
"Happy am I; from care I'm free! 
Why aren't they all contented like me?" 

Born December 4, 1910; Attleboro High School; 
Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3. 4. Cabinet 4, Conventions Com- 
mittee 2, Program Committee 2, Social Service 1, 3; 
Student Board 1, 2. 3. 4; La Petite Academie 3, 4; 
Deutscher Verein 2, 3, 4. Piogram Coinmittee 4; Phi 
Sigma Iota 3, 4; Ramsdell Scientific 3, 4; Alethea 2, 
3, Piogram Committee 3; Delta Phi Alpha 4; Honor 
Student in German; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; First Prize 
in Phi Beta Kappa Reading 3; Social Science Com- 
mittee 1; Play Day Committee 3, 4; Delegate to Maqua 
and Poland Springs Conventions 3; Hockey 3, 4, Cap- 
tain 3, 4; Volleyball 3; Winter Sports 1; Basketball 
3, 4; Soccer 3; Numerals 2. 

Here's to Muriel — a good sport, a good athlete, a 
good scholar, and a good friend and pal. Muriel's 
dependability to do the right thing at the right time 
makes her a favorite with us. 

EMERSON FLOYD BLODGETT. A.B. 

New Gloucester, Me. 

"We are his people, and the sheep of his pasture." 

Born March 14, 1908; Montpelier Seminary; Grad- 
uate of Bangor Theological Seminary 1930; Honor 
Student, Psychology; Assistantship, Psychology 4. 

The two years Emerson has spent at Bates gave 
us a better understanding of the Minister as he really 
is, off duty. Theology added to psychology should 
make him unusually successful. 








rAGE FORTY-THREE 




THE 

lyi j 15 150 15 >-.Ai 

*" I ^y —J -"^ <^'**.w " 




_^A 



^A-_.. 




•i\ 













JULIA ADELAIDE BRIGGS. A.B. 

Lfwiston, Me. 
"Little is as little does." 

Born May 2, 1910: Jordan High School; Y. W. C. 
A. 1, 2, 3. 4; Town Girl Jlepi esentati ve 4; Vice-Presi- 
dent 4; Sophomore Hop Committee 2; Junior Cabaret 
Committee 3; Ivy Hop Committee 3; Chaiiman Senior 
Girls' Dance; Chaiiman Mardi Gras 3; Carnival Hop 
Committee 4; Senior Formal Committee 4; La I'etite 
Academie 2, 3; Women's I'olitics Club 2, 3, 4, Presi- 
dent 4; Lambda Alpha 1, 2, 3. 4; Outing- Club 1, 2, 3, 
4, Directoi' 3, 4; Carnival Queen 4 

This little g-irl has done big things in a big way. 
Judy has been right in the midst of things since her 
matiiculation, whether it be for work or for play. 
Scholastically slie is an ace; athletically she is a 
deuce; and socially she is the Queen. 

RUTH MARJORIE BRIGGS. A.B. 

^Mechanic E''alls, Mi\ 

"She was clever, witty, bi-illiant, and sparkling 
bey(jnd most of her kind, but possessed of many 
devils of mischievousness." 

Born January 16, 1911; Jlechanic Falls High 
School; Student Government Board 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 
1, 2, 3, 4; Heelers 2; 4A Players 3, 4; Macfarlane Club 
3, 4, President 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Choir 1, 2, 3. 4; 
La Petite Academie 2, 3; I'hi Sigma Iota 3, 4; Outing 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Fresliman I'lize Speaking: Ivy Dav 
Speaker; Hockey 2, 3, 4; Varsity 3; Basketball 1, 3, 4; 
Baseball 1, 2, 3; Soccer 1, 2. 3; Varsity 1; Numerals 1; 
"B" Sweater 4; Varsity Play 2, 4; Pop Concert Com- 
mittee 4. 

Pudge is so clever in so many things that we are 
at a loss to know which are her chief accomplish- 
ments. Pudge, not only interested but also skilled 
in music, dramatics, and athletics, is always rushing 
to a practice or a rehearsal. But no matter how busy 
she is, she always finds time to go home over the 
week-end. 



PAUL O'CONNOR BROGGI. B.S. 

Sanfoid, .Me. 

"Time's Horses gallop down the lessening hill." 

i:orn :\Iav 3, 1911; Sanford High School: Football 
1: Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3; Varsity Club 4; Debating Council 
1; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior Exhibition 3. 

Broggi is a fellow of congenial personality. Four 
years at Bates for him has meant among other things 
four years of valuable co-operation and friendship 
with his college mates. 

THEODORE R. BROWN. B.S. 

Laconia, N. H. 

"O sleep, it is a gentle thing 
Beloved from pole to pole." 

Born Julv 28, 190S; Holderness School; Y. M. C. A. 
1. 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Football 1, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 3, 4. 

Ted has done much to aid the cause of athletics 
here at college and the same hard hitting and fair 
playing that lias already brought him fame will serve 
as a basis for his future success. 



PAGE FORTY-FOUR 




"TH E 

: • M 19 32- " ^ " 



■^^ 



„. ^ 'mMUka^ud 



ORIMER E. BUGBEE. A.B. 

Xewpoit, N. H. 

Born July 24, 1911; Towle High School; Debating- 
3, 4; Debating Council 2, 3, 4; Spofford Club 1, 2. 3, 4; 
Politics Club 3, 4; Trize Speaking 1, 2; Baseball 3, 4. 

Bugs talked and smiled some of his -way througii 
school and then -when necessary hit the books and 
proved himself to be a good student. His vocabulary 
of polysyllabic words was unexcelled in the whole 
college. 

MADALINE LOUISE BUMPUS. A.B. 
IVIARGARET LILLIAN BUMPUS. A.B. 

Auburn, ile. 

"Alike as two peas." 

Born July 27, 1909; Edward Little High School; 
Lambda Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1. 2, 3. 4 ; Y. W. 
C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

We never really could tell you apart in spite of 
the fact that one professor hinted that you sometimes 
wore different colored stockings. You both smile so 
shyly and cheerily, you both always come and go to- 
gether, and you both always dress alike. Fortunately 
for A. A. you bt>th jjlayed goalie in hockey — on oppos- 
ing teams. Dubbed the "Bumpi" at Fresliman school 
you never could live it down! 

VALERY BURATI, A.B. 

Coman, Austria 
"No laws do bind me." 
Born April 12, 1907: Athol High School; Y. M. C. 
A. Cabinet 2; The Bates Student 1, 2, News Editor 3, 
Editor-in-Chief 4; Bates College Publishing Associa- 
tion 3; The Garnet, Editor-in-Chief 3, 4; 4A Players 
3, 4; Heelers 1, 2; Spofford Club 2. 3, 4, President 3, 
4; Phil-Hellenic 2, 3, Secretary 3; Outing Club Presi- 
dent 4; Sophomore Prize Speaking; Junior Exhibition; 
Ivy Day Ode; Assistant in Economics 3; Bishop Stev- 
ens Greek Prize 1; Philosophy Club; Winter Sports 
Co-Captain 4. 

Such is Val our brainiest man, loved by his friends 
and feared by his enemies. Val, quietly industri()us 
and energetic, pursued a conscientious and persever- 
ing course throughout his four years. 

Among his acquaintances Val is said to be a fisher- 
man of great ability — as well as an able mountain 
climber, and a good man on skis. 



BLANCHE DOROTHEE CASSISTA, A.B. 

Lewiston, Me. 

"Her voice was soft, gentle and low." 

Born January 25, 1901; Edward Little High School; 
Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. 3, 4; La Petite Academic 4; Phi 
Sigma lota 4; Lambda Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman 
Prize Speaking; Junior Exhibition. 

There is an unassuming keenness in this girl's 

mind which makes us, and her teachers, like her. 

And it takes perseverance to come back and to finish 
interrupted college life. 



PAGE FORTY-FIVE 




THE 



MII^I^OI^ 



932 






, V— igy^jfc 




GEORGE ANTHONY BURKE, A.B. 

Lewiston, 'Me. 

"But as you know me all, a plain, blunt man, 
That love my friend." 

Born December 3, lfl09: Jordan High School: Poli- 
tics Club 3, 4; Honor Student, Economics 4; Assistant- 
ship, Economics 3, 4; Manager of Freshman Football 
2, 

The deeds men do speak for themselves. George 
has been liberal with his assistance in his quiet way 
at all times. 

BERNICE MABEL BURNHAM. A.B. 

Kittery, Me. 

"Who mixed reason with pleasure 
And wisdom with mirth." 

Born July 24, 1911: Traip Academy: Y. ^V. C. A. 1, 

2, 3, 4. Social Committee 3, 4: La Petite Academie 2, 

3, 4, Treasurer 4: Phi Sigma Iota 3, 4: Outing Club 1, 
2, 3, 4. 

Bunny is one of the quiet girls in class, but the 
"gang" knows that she isn't always that way. She's 
a true friend, a good student and a person who can 
he depended upon to get things done when she says 
she will. 



JOHN M. CARROLL. JR.. A.B. 

Lewiston, Me. 

"The cry of an applauding multitude. 
Swayed by some loud-voiced orator." 

Born September 9, 1906; Jordan High School; Var- 
.-iitv Debating 2, 3. 4: Debating (^)uncil 2, 3, 4: Delta 
Sigma Rho: Spofford Club 4: Politics Club 4: Prize 
Speaking 1, 2, Freshman Prize Debate: Assistantships, 
Biology 2, 3; Social Science 3, 4. 

Next to the degree of marriage John decided that 
it would be worthwhile to get his degree from Bates 
after an absence of several years. His abilities as 
a debater and as an assistant have not gone un- 
noticed. 



ROBERT LEWIS CARTER, A.B. 

Manchester, Conn. 

"If you would be loved, be lovable." 

Born Februarv 21, 1910: So. Manchester High 
Scliool; Politics Club 4; Band 1, 2. 3, 4: Macfarlane 
Club 3, 4: Carnival Hop 3; Y. .M, C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Out- 
ing Club Director 1, 2, 3, 4: Tennis Team 3, 4. 

The quotation is Bob's and accordingly he wore a 
different tie each morning. Bob has had so many 
"affaires de coeui" that he leaves a string of broken 
hearts from one end of the Twin Cities to the other. 



PAGE FORTY-SIX 




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SHIRLEY CAVE, A.B. 

Gorham, N. H. 

"She hath prosperous art 

When she will play with reason and discourse. 

And well she can persuade — " 
Born February 6, 1911; Gorham Hish School; Y. W. 
C. A. 1, 2. 3, 4; Bates Mirror, Personal Editor 4; Bates 
Student 1, 2, 3, 4, Debating Editor 4: Bates Publish- 
ing: Association 3, 4, Secretary 4; Debating Council 2, 
3, 4; Sophomore Prize Debate, Individual Winner; 
Varsity Debating 3, 4; Alethea 3; Numerals 2; Outing- 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior Exhibition; Honor Student in 
English; Spofford Club 4; Manager of AVomen's De- 
bating 4; Delta Sigma Rho 4. 

A fine ability in good-natured conversation, with 
all its possibilities for use of repartee, coupled with 
a clearness in thinking have made Shirley a good 
debater. The cracker-box tradition, however, did not 
keep her from exercising these talents in the journal- 
istic fields of the "Student" and "Miiror" and in the 
more interesting activities of collegiate society. 



CALVIN B. CHAMBERLAIN. B.S. 

Norwood, Mass. 

Born Januaiv l(i, 1907; Norwood High School; Y. 
M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Council 1; Athletic Council 
4; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; Heelers 1; Glee Club 1; Jordan 
Scientific 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, Director 4; Assis- 
tant in Biology 3, 4; Football 2, 3. 4; Hockey 3. 

Cal's bigness physically extended to the good 
human kindliness which was the reason for that 
broad smile. He is a living and successful proof that 
co-education is not detrimental to college life. In 
fact he joins the ranks along with Long in demon- 
strating that one can be happy and mariied. 





MILAN A. CHAPIN, JR.. B.S. 

Bethel, Me. 

Born May 9, 1911; Gould Academy; Lawrance 
Chemical Society 2, 3, 4, Vice-president 4; Deutscher 
Verein 2, 3. 4. 

We knew Red as a pleasant dispositioned, hard- 
working fellow who was always sincere, persevering, 
and skillful in the activities in which he engaged. 
Whether on a cabin party refreshment committee or 
in the act of instructing a fellow student in labora- 
tory procedure, Red was thorough, patient, and clever. 
We wish him all the good fortune in the world in 
his future work in the Chem field and know it has 
already commenced by that fine scholarship at Clark. 



WALDO ARLAND CLAPP, B.S. 

West Brooklin, Jle. 

Born February 12, 1912; Brooklin High School; 
Varsity Club 4; Jordan Scientific Society 3, 4; Outing 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, Track Manager 3, 4; Secretary 
N. E. I. C. A. A. 

Carnegie, the Gym, Hedge, Parker, and Carnegie 
again — this was Waldo's "petty round of irritating 
cares". 





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GILBERT CLAPPERTON. B.S. 

Aubuiii, Me. 




••O Music. 



.Friend of Pleasure, Wisdom's aid. 



Born November Ifi, 1905: Jordan High School; Band 
1, 2, 3. 4. Director of Band 3, 4; Macfarlane (Mub, Vice- 
piesident 3, 4; Diiector of Little Symphony 3, 4; Jor- 
dan Scientific Club 3, 4, President 4; Assistant in Biol- 
oRy; Ivy Day Marshal; Ivy Day Committee; College 
("iub. 

The technique of the conductor's baton oi- of the 
biologist's scapel hold no mysteries for Gil. The 
effort he has made to put Bates on the map as a 
C(illege of good musical organizations, and his ability 
as a student and an outstanding campus citizen leave 
no doubt as to the reason for his election to the Col- 
lege Club. 



AUGUSTA GERTRUDE COHEN, A.B. 

Winthrop, JIass. 

"As bright as her shining locks." 

Born December 3, 1911; AVinthrop High School; 
y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Bates Mirror 4; Student 2. 3, 4; 
La Petite Academic 2, 3, Secretary 4; Deutscher Verein 
4; Phi Sigma lota 3, 4; Ramsdell Scientific 3, 4; Outing 
Club 1, 2, 3. 4; Assistant in French 4; Delta Plii Alpha 
4; French Prize Speaking 3, 2nd Prize. 

Gus will always live in the annals of Bates as the 
originator of the Salon where we conversed in French 
and ate in English. She also was the instigator of 
the French tables that have conti'ibuted their musi- 
cal intonations this year to swell the din of Fiske 
dining hall. 



NORMAN COLE. B.S. 

Gray, Me. 

Born May 8, 1910; Pennell Institute; Varsity Club 
3, 4; Glee Club 1; Lawrance Chemical Society 3, 4, 
President 4; Outing Club 1. 2, 3, 4, Director 2; Cross 
Country 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Norm lives the happy life of one who works well, 
worries little, and laughs much. 



AUBIGNE GUSHING. A.B. 

Gra.N-, Me. 

"Few things are impossible to diligence and skill." 

Born December- 5, 1909; Pennell Institute; Student 
Government 4; House Senior; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Freshman Commission 1, Cabinet 2; Junior Cabaret 
Comnrittee; Y. W. C. A. Bazaar Committee: Sopho- 
rirore Dance Committee: Sophomore Banquet; Back- 
to-Bates Night Student Chairman 4; Freshman Initia- 
tion Committee 2; Glee Club 1: Choir 1; Ramsdell 
Scientific 3, 4, Vice-President 3, President 4; Alethea 
2: Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Director 2; Assistant in Biol- 
ogy 3, 4; Hockey 1, 2; Track 1, 2, 3. Captain 2; Base- 
ball 1, 2; Numerals 2. 

Do you need repair-irrg? Need ideas for parties? 
Need posters? Whatever you need. Doc Gushing- can 
help you out. She is indefatigable, energetic, tal- 
ented, clever, and popular, an all-ar-ound good sport 
and a good pal. 



PAGE FORTY-EIGHT 




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REBECCA IMOGENE COUSINS. A.B. 

Stonington, Me. 

"Begone, dull care." 

Born October 11, 1910; Stonington High School; 
Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 4, Membership Committee, .3; W. A. 
A. Board 4; Heelers 1, 2; La Petite Academie 3. 4; 
Deutscher Verein 3. 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Numer- 
als 2; Baseball 1, 2; Soccer 2, 3; Hockey 4; Chairman 
Senior Stunt Committee 4; Chairman Play Day Com- 
mittee 3, Play Day Program Committee 4. 

Becky keeps Rand Hall amused; mostly uninten- 
tionally. Her interests are somewhat divided be- 
tween her studies at Bates and her friend at Maine, 
but she finds time to do little things like running a 
Play Day or planning a stunt. 



BERTHA WILHELMINA CRITCHELL, A.B. 

Dorchester, Mass. 

"I shall never be aware of iny own wit till I 
break my shins against it." 

Born July 3, 1909; Eastern Maine Conference Sem- 
inary; Alethea 2, 3; Phi Sigma Iota 3, 4; Deutscher 
Verein 3, 4, Vice-President 4; W. A. A. Board 4, Jlan- 
ager of Hockey 4; Play Day Committee 4; Bates Stu- 
dent 1. 2, 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Industrial Club 
3. 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Hockey 3, 4; Volleyball 2, 
3; Soccer 2. 

Serenely forgetful, Mina dashes to French Con 
without her carefully prepared paper, trips to the 
bookstore without her money, and passes a mailbox 
without giving a thought to the letters tucked away 
in her book. But she never forgets to liven up any 
group she is with nor does she ever fail one as a 
friend. 

FRANCES MARY CRONIN, A.B. 

Lewiston, Me. 

"When Irish eyes are smiling — " 

Born July 31, 1911; Jordan High School; Y. W. C. 
A. 1, 2, 3, 4; W. A. A. Board 4; Banquet Committee 
4; Vice-President of Class 3; Heelers 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Women's Politics Club 3, 4; Lambda Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Outing Club 1. 2, 3, 4; Hockey 4; Co-captain 4; Sopho- 
more Girls' Dance; Junior Cabaret Committee, Ivy 
Hop Committee; Chairman Junior Girls' Dance Com- 
mittee; Senior Girls' Dance Committee; Class Pin 
Committee 2; Class Blazer Committee 3; Chairman 
Back-to-Bates Tea 4; Bates Mirror Staff 4. 

If you have had a chance for observation, you 
can easily understand the class vote which named 
Fran the most popular girl in the class. She stars 
as an executive, a pal, and a coeducator. 

MARION JOSEPHINE CROSBY. A.B. 

Auburn, Me. 

"A clear mind and a convincing speech." 

Born December 23, 1905; Edward Little High 
School; Y. W. C. A. 1. 2, 3, 4; Varsity Debating 2; 
Delta Sigma Rho 2, 3, 4; Honor Student in English 
4; Assistant in English 4. 

It is reputed that this girl even takes plea.sure in 

final examinations and in passing them — in college 

and in life. This is a reflection of her zest for pro- 
ductive living. 



PAGE FORTY-NINE 




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CONSTANCE MARGUERITE CURRY, A.B. 

Gardiner, ile. 

"She is pi-etty to walk witli, 

And witty to talk with, 

And pleasant, too, to thinl< on." 

Born June 4, 1910; Gardiner High School: Y. "W. 
C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Politics Cluh 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 

2, 3, 4; House Council 2, 3: Dining- Room Committee 

3, 4, Chairman 4. 

Connie the dig-nified, the well dressed, the — well, 
everything: nice. What a surprise to find beneath 
that austere surface a merry disposition and a fine 
friend and companion! 

CHARLES TRUMAN DEMAREST. A.B. 

Ilri.-^tol. Ciinn. 

"Some men are born great — others achieve their 
greatness when they become seniors." 

Born April 13, 1909; Bristol High School; Assist- 
ant in English 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Honor Student 
in Engiisli; Phi Beta Kappa. 

Charlie has surely led a secluded life thus far. 
tUit though he isn't seen much, he certainly has been 
heard, and some of his stories are fast. Besides 
being a chionic wise-crackei-, Charlie is also a very 
ednscientious fellow, and considers it his duty to 
.((■(luaint himself thoroughly with what he is talking 
.ibout. 



PARKER JEROME DEXTER. A.B. 

Auburn, Mass. 

"They go wild — " 

Born February 23, 1910; Worcester North High 
School; Mirror Staff, Society Editor; The Bates Stu- 
dent 1. 2, 3, 4; Heelers 2, 3, 4; Politics Club 4; Y. M. 
C. A. 1, 2, 3. 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

When P. J. speaks or begins to dance, when the 
music is pla.ving and all that, why it's just impossible 
for any of the fair co-eds to resist him. In other 
words, he's iiresistible. Dex has another great dis- 
tinction — his knowledge of the cinema and stage. He 
certainly knows all the dope on the actors. In fact 
he knows more about what goes on back stage than 
does Walt Winchell. 



GERTRUDE BARROWCLOUGH DIEHL, A.B. 

Auburn, Me. 
"My man's as true as steel." 

Born February 23, 1910; Edward Little High 
School; Deutschei- Verein 3, 4; Sodalitas Latina 4, 
President; Lambda Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Campus Night 
Committee 2; Alethea 2, Assistant in Latin 4; Entre 
Nous 1; Class Numerals; General Scholai'ship Prize 
2, 3; Phi Beta Kappa. 

Speaking of steel reminds us of bars; and bars 
remind us that Gertie believed in starting the life 
sentence young'. And Prexy permitted iti Ah. lass! 
Gertie, we still think you'd make a wonderful Latin 
teacher. 



PAGE FIFTY 




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■ 'i 19 32 



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GERTRUDE JESSIE DIGGERY, A.B. 

Sant'ord, Me. 
"The gods themselves cannot recall their gifts." 
Born June 25, 1910; Sanford High School; Student 
Government Board 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Bates 
Mirror Board, Society Editor 4; Freshman Dance 
Committee; Sophomore Girls' Dance Committee; Mardi 
Gras Committee 3; La Petite Academic 2, 3, 4, Secre- 
tary 3; Spofford Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4: 
Deutscher Veiein 3, 4; Phi Sigma Iota 3, 4; Alethea 
2; Outing Club 1. 2, 3, 4; Sophomore Prize Speaking; 
Ivy Day Committee 3; Hockey 1, 2, 3; Basketball 1, 

2, 3, 4; Baseball 1. 2, 3, 4; Varsity Hockey 2; Soccer 
1, 2, 3, 4; Numerals 1; "B" Sw^eater 3. 

Gert Diggery? Oh yes, it doesn't take a second 
thought to recall her as one of the most popular 
girls in the class, equally proficient on the Rand 
hockey field, the Chase Hall dance floor, and in the 
class room. Her more intimate friends remember too. 
her professional expertness at hair dressing and her 
keen appreciation of instrumental music. 

CLINTON DILL, B.S. 

Houlton, Me. 
"He knows much who knows when to speak. 
But far more who knows when to hold his tongue." 
Born June 26, 1911; Houlton High School; Student 
Council 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Bates Mirror Staff, 
Assistant Personal Editor; Athletic Association 1, 2, 

3, 4, Secretary 2; Athletic Council 3, 4; Varsity Club 
1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Chairman Varsity Club Dance 
3, 4; La Petite Academic 3, 4; Phi Sigma lota 3, 4; 
Jordan Scientific Society 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Director 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; College Club. 

Clint has proved so loyal to Bates traditions that 
he was appointed proctor in John Bertram Hall. He 
has done a great deal for his Alma Mater. 

NORMAN IRWIN DOUGLAS, A.B. 

Gardiner, Sle. 

"A mighty man w^as he." 

Born October 25, 1909; Cony High School; Varsity 
Club 3, 4; Phil-Hellenic 2. 3. Secretary-Treasurer 4; 
Track 2, 3, 4; Manager Freshman Cross Country 3; 
Manager Varsity Cross Country 4; Assistant in Gov- 
ernment 4. 

Doug's physical bigness carried over into the 
more studious pursuits of college in such a way that 
his name was with honor on the track squad and in 
the classroom. 



WILLIAM HENRY DUNHAM. A.B. 

Dexter, Me. 

"I know some of my work is good if only people 
could see." 

Born June 21, 1910; Fay High School; Bates Stu- 
dent, General News Editor; President of the Publish- 
ing Association 4; Vice-President Y. M. C. A. 3; Jun- 
ior Cabaret 3; Varsity Debating 3, 4; Debating Coun- 
cil 3, 4; Band 1; Spofford Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Politics Club 
3, 4; Junior Exhibition; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Orator 
and Chairman of Ivy Day; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Delegate 
to National "Y" Conference at Detroit, 1930; Honor 
Student in Govei-nment; Delta Sigma Rho; College 
Club. 

Introducing — the Hon. William H. Dunham, the 
youthful Demosthenes — our amiable Cicero. F'rin- 
stance confesses that oratory is his first, favorite, 
primary, and fundamental amusement. After that 
comes javelin throwing. We admit the oratorical 
prowess, but after three years of practice, F'rinstance 
still insists on throwing the javelin tail first. 



PAGE FIFTY-ONE 




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ELDEN HERBERT DUSTIN, A.B. 

(•oiit(.(M/,.(.k. X. H. 

"Well, iKJW ARE you?" 

Born February 18, liUl; Hopkinton High School; 
Reportorial Staff of "Student" 1, 2, 3, Managing- Edi- 
tor 4; rOditor-in-Chief of "Mirror" 4; Cosmos Club 1, 
2, 3, 4; Council on Religion 4; La Petite Academie 3, 
4; French Prize Speaking 3: Deutscher Verein 3, 4; 
President Delta Phi Alpha 4; Phi Sigma Iota 3, 4; 
Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; College Club; Phi Beta Kappa. 

Elden's varied accomplishments in the pursuit of 
journalism, studies, and a good time have kept hiiri 
from being Dusty in all except name. His successors 
in these lines will have a hard time to meet his 
standards. 



RICHARD C. ELLIOTT, A.B. 

Wohurn, Mass. 

Born JIarch S, litlO; Woburn High; Y. M. C. A. 
1, 2. 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Chair- 
man, Unitarian Students Committee. 

Having heard Dick in the cheering section during 
four seasons of football games, we are convinced that 
he excels all Maine collegians in sheer lung power. 
We can also say, however, that Dick has been one of 
the most consistent rooters for Bates in all lines of 
activity and that such a quality should set us an 
example of College loyalty. 



GEORGE STANLEY EVERETT. A.B. 

Lewiston, Me. 

"A well of science." 

Born August 20, 1906; Lawrance Chemical Society; 
Outing Club; Assistant in Physics. 

The class is proud to have Stan among its mem- 
bers. Teacher, husband, father, photogiaplier, mathe- 
matician, lover of fine arts and the humanities, this 
fellow — well, enough said. 



EMILY FRANCES FINN, A.B. 

Lcwi.st..n. .\U'. 

"A little work, a little pla.v, 

To keep us going — and so good-day." 

Born August 3, 1911; Jordan High School; W. A. 

A. Board, Vice-President 3, President 4; La Petite 

Academie 3, 4, Treasurer 3; Phi Sigma Iota 4; Lambda 

Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Vice-President 3; Alethea 

2, 3; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Athletic Teams: Hockey 

1, 2, 3, 4; (Honorary Varsitv 3;) Basketball 1. 2. 3. 4 
(Varsity 2. 3, Captain 1, 2); Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4 (Varsity 

2, 3); Track 1, 2; Soccer Varsity 2, 3; Numerals 1; B 
Club 3; Ivv Dav Committee 3; Representative to 
.Maine Play Day 3; Colby Play Day 4; Student Coach 
3. 

Good athlete, good student, good sport all around — 
what more could we say about Kmmy? She has done 
much for women's athletics and has endeared herself 
to all by her fine leadership and coopeiation. 



PAGE FIFTY-TWO 




THE 

" - - ' 1932 






Jl 



PRUDENT MAURICE ALEXANDER FORTIN. A.B. 

Auburn, Jle. 

"Let tlie man speak for liimself." 

Born September 11. 1910; Edward Little High 
School; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2. 3. 4; La Petite Academie 3, 4; 
Outing Club 1, 2, 3. 4; P'ootball 1, 2, 3. 4. 

Speedy is a man of many capabilities. He was a 
useful member of the football squad for four years. 




HELEN FRANCES FOSS. A.B. 

Suncook, N. H. 

"A merry lieart maketh a cheeiful countenance." 

Born January 6, 1912; Pembroke Academy; Y. W. 
C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4; Freshman Coinmission 1; Macfarlane 
Club 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Cosmos Club 2, 3, 4. Vice- 
President 4; Alethea 3; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Numer- 
als 2; House Council 2, 3. 

Helen's infectious giggle has added much to the 
merry atmosphere of Rand Hall this year. She's even 
able to laugh when tackling serious responsibilities 
and executing them capably. 




CARROLL BENJAMIN FOSTER, B.S. 

Duxbury, Mass. 

"Thoroughness is my motto." 

Born December 17. 1910; Duxbury High School; 
Football 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2. 3, 4. 

Carroll is one of the silent members of our class. 
One of those quiet fellows who is satisfied in keeping 
his knowledge to himself. 

Carroll's favorite pastimes are dancing and punish- 
ing a harmonica. We don't mind the dancing — but 
that mouth organ — 



/'-. 




EDITH LUCILE FOULGER, A.B. 

Ogden. Utah 

"Few things are impossible to diligence and skill." 

Ogden High School; Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; Macfarlane 
Club 2, 3, 4; Heelers 2; Alethea 2. 3, Piesident 3; 
Junior Exhibition 3; Piize Speaking 1. 2. Individual 
winner 1; Commencement Prize 2: Council on Religion 
4; House Senior 4; Ivy Day Speaker 3; Assistant in 
English 4; Honor Student in I'^nglisli 4; Piii Beta 
Kappa. 

Cile can write blank verse, portray Shakespeare's 
Audrey, deliver a witty speech, or preside as a House 
Senior, all with equal ability and modesty. 




PAGE FIFTY-THREE 



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PRISCILLA DAVIS GOODWIN. A.B. 

Farminpton, Me. 

"If mu.sic be the food of love, play on." 

Born June 13, 1911; Farmington High School; Glee 
Club 1, 2. 3, 4; Macfarlane Club 4; La Petite Academie 
4; Phi Sigma Iota 3, 4; Ramsdell Scientific 4; Outing 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 1. 2, 3, 4. 

It is rumored by those who know that Pu.'^.s ha.s a 
decided weakness for temperamental musicians and 
decided opinions. 



MAXFIELD GORDON. 

Lynn, .\Ia.s.s. 



B.S. 



"All great men are dead, and I'm not feeling well 
myself." 

Born January 13, 1911; Lynn Classical High School; 
Humor E'ditor of Mirror; The Bates Student 3, 4; 
Y. M. C. A. 1, 2. 3; Varsity Club 4; Chairman Senior 
Formal; Glee Club 4; Orphic 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Tiack 1; Hockey 4; Football 2, 3, Varsity 4. 

Behold a compact bundle of bristling personality. 
In Max w^e have a lively boy full of fun and always 
up to .'something. Indeed we were sometimes con- 
vinced that his family tree inust have been a nut 
tree. Between the Biography Club, tlie Social Swing, 
and his Bridge Classes, Max was kept on the jump 
every minute of the time. 



JEANNETTE LENONA GOTTESFELD. A.B. 

Lewiston, Me. 

Born October 10, 1911; Jordan High School; Y. W. 
C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Heelers 1, 2; La Petite Academie 3. 4, 
President 4; Deutscher Verein 4; Phi Sigma Iota 3, 
4; Lambda Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4: Jun- 
ior Exhibition; Honor Student in French 4; Assistant 
in French 4; French Prize Speaking Contest 3; Delta 
Phi Alpha 4; Phi Beta Kappa. 

Why do some people give Jeanne the middle name 
"Service"? Because she knows how to give and get 
service in a most pleasing and efficient manner. A 
great pal (despite her size) and a wonderful friend — 
that is the opinion of those who know her well. 

ALICE MURIEL GOWER. A.B. 

Skowhegan, Me. 

"The heart to conceive, the understanding to 
direct, or the hand to execute." 

Born August 8, 1910; Skowhegan High School; Y. 
\V. C. A. 1, 2, 3. 4, Cabinet 3, 4; Chairman Social Com- 
mittee 3, 4; Bates Mirror Staff; Pop Concert Com- 
mittee 4; Chairman Back-to-Bates Tea 3; Mardi Gras 
Committee 3; Macfarlane Club 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; La Petite Academie 2, 3; Phi Sigma Iota 2, 3; 
Alethea 2, 3; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; History Assistant 
4; Chairman Prize Speaking 1; Chairman Ivy Day 
Speakers. 

Take some one efficient, some one courteous and 
gracious, some one charming to talk with or to be 
silent with, and all together you will have Muttie. 
There isn't much she can do without success, whether 
it be directing Y's social activities, singing in choir 
and glee club or correcting Amos' history papers. 
All of her undertakings end this one way — success- 
fully. 



PAGE FIFTY-FOUR 




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DOROTHY GRACE FUGE, A.B. 

Thompsonville, Conn. 

"That one small head could carry all she knew." 

Born May 11, 1911; Enfield High School; Y. W. C. A. 
1, 2, 3, 4; Bates Student 2, 3, Women'.s Editor 4; 
Alethea 2, 3; Bates Mirror Board 4. 

Dot must know more than the average co-ed for 
she is responsible for all the "Student" news froin 
her side of the campus. Whenever you see her on 
campus you can find a golden red head not far off. 
That is Vesta. 




WILLIS JOSEPH FURTWENGLER. B.S. 

Waterbury, Conn. 

Born December 2S, 1907; Wilby High School; Var- 
sity Club 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Lawrance 
Chemical Society 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Cross Country 
1, 2, 3, 4; Heelers 1, 2; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Furt was among the most persevering in the hard 
cross country grinds. And, when he kept liimself 
away from the chemistry and physics Labs long 
enough for us to get acquainted with him, he proved 
to have a very smiling disposition, and a broadness 
of interests which make him good company and a 
good friend. 



GLADYS VIOLA GODDARD. A.B. 

Orange, Mass. 

"A true friend is ever a friend." 

Born July 23, 1910; Orange High School; rhil- 
Hellenic 2, 3, 4; Sodalitas Latina 4, Vice-president; 
Alethea 2; W. A. A. Board 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; 
Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 
1. 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Numerals 2; 
"B" Sweater 3. 

A student, athlete, and friend. Glad is alwa.vs 
steadfast and reliable, always ready to help one out 
of a tight place, and the most willing of friends. 




HARRISON GREENLEAF, A.B. 

Auburn, Me. 

"The true literary man." 

Born January 7, 1910; Edward Little High School; 
Varsity Debating 2, 3, 4; Debating Council 2, 3, 4; 
Delta Sigma Rho 4; Prize Speaking and Debating 2, 
3, 4; Junior Exhibition 3. 

Harrison has distinguished himself for his out- 
standing versatility in journalism, forensics, and ath- 
letic contest write-ups. 




PAGE FIFTY-FIVE 




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KATE REBEKAH HALL, A.B. 

Runifoid. Mp. 

"They tliat govern the most make the least noise." 

Born September 25, 1910; Stephens High School; 
Student Government 2. 3, 4, Sophomore Representative 

2, Vice-president 3, President 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3. 
4; :\lacfailane Club 2, Z. I'rogiam (^l^lnlittee 3; Glee 
('lull 1, 2, 3; Choir 1, 2. 3. 4: Deutscher Verein 2, 3; 
Outing- Club 1, 2. 3, 4; Ivy Day Committee 3; Sopho- 
moie Banquet 2; Student Government Banquet 3; 
Hockey 1; AVinter Sports 1. 2. 3: Baseball 1, 2. 4; 
Numerals; Phi Beta Kappa. 

Kay started in making her mark in her Freshman 
year and has been ever since. She makes an efficient 
leader and usually gets what she wants, even though 
she doesn't make a great to-do about her successes. 

ALICE ELIZABETH HELLIER, A.B. 

Rockland, Jle. 

"If eyes were made for seeing 

Then Beauty is its own excuse for being." 

Born March 1). 1911; Rockland High School; Y. W. 
C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Secretary 3, 4: Freshman Dance 
Committee 1; Sophomore Hop Committee; Junior 
Cabaiet Committee; Ivy Hop Committee: Sophomore 
Girls' Dance Committee; Junior Gir's' Dance Com- 
mittee: Politics Club 4; Outing Club 1. 2, 3. 4. Junior 
Body 4; Hockey 2, 4; Captain of Blacks 4; Class 
Numerals 2; Soccer 1, 2, 3. 

Beauty plus a sweet disposition equals popularity. 
Al is beloved b)- all her friends and admired by those 
who are only fortunate enough to know her slightly. 

CHARLES WALTER WING, A.B. 

Lewiston. Me. 

"You've got to consider this fact." 

Born Septembei- 3, 1910; Jordan High School; Y. M. 
C. A.; Athletic Association; Politics Club 3. Vice- 
President 4; Outing Club; Football 2, 3, 4; Track 2, 

3, 4. 

Besides working hard at his studies, Charlie has 
given much of bis time to football and track with 
some political club activities added for good measure. 
We expect he will show the same widespread interests 
when he is finding himself a career in life. 



MARGARET ELIZABETH HINES, A.B. 

Lewiston. Me. 

"In framing an aitist, art hath thus decreed 
To make some good, but others to succeed." 

Born June 14. 1911; Jordan High School; Student 
Government Board 4; Bates Mirror Staff, Dramatic 
Editor; Class Secretary 2; Heeleis Club 2; 4A Players 
3, 4, President 4; Piize Speaking 2; Ivv Dav Speaker, 
Gifts to Men. 

The success is yours. Peg, as you have so ably 
shown us, in speaking, acting, and coaching these 
liast four years. Much credit is due you for helping 
make the Bates 4A players what they are today. 



PAGE FIFTY-SIX 




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Ik 



MARY FRANCES HOAG, A.B. 

Runiford, ^le. 

"A witty woman is a treasure." 

Born July 28, 1908; Stephens High School: Y. AV. 
C. A. 1, 2, 3. 4; Outing- Club 1. 2, 3, 4; Women's Poli- 
tics Club 4; Bates Mirror, Historian 4; Bates Student 
2, 3, 4, Intercollegiate Editor 4. 

One of the good things about Mary is that she 
never shows her capabilities I'or sarcasm to any one 
who does not know her also as one of the best pals 
in the •world — and that isn't the only nice thing- that 
could be said about her. 

ALTHEA EDWINA HOWE, A.B. 

Ipswich, Mass. 
"It is better to wear out than rust out." 

Born December 7, 1911; Manning High School; Y. 
W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Publicity 3; Bazaar Committee 2, 
3; Bates Mirror Staff 4; Bates Student Staff 3, 4; 
W. A. A. Board 2, 3, 4, Seci-etary 2, Class Representa- 
tive 3; Manager Winter Sports 4; Heelers Club 1, 2. 3. 
4; Women's Politics Club 3, 4; Secretary-Treasurer 4; 
Alethea Club 3; Outing Club 1. 2, 3, 4; Hockey 1, 2, 3, 
4; Baseball 2, 3, 4; Volleyball 1; Soccer 1, 2, 3; Numer- 
als 2; Sweater 3. 

One may be sure Al will never become rusty for 
she is one of our most energetic girls. No class ath- 
letic team is complete unless her name is theie. And 
Howe! Whatever she does, Al does well, whether 
it's writing for newspapers, playing a game, or talk- 
ing. 



WAYNE E. HOYLE, A.B. 

Mechanic Falls, ile. 

"Where he Leads — " 

Born June 16. 1907; Bangor Theological Seminary. 

Wayne is one of these active theologians who, 
apart from living an active campus life, is Bates 
official representative at Baptist births, marriages, 
and deaths in Jlechanic Falls. 



MARTIN COOPER HUBBARD 

South Braintree, Mass. 

"Industria" 

Born November 4, 1909; Thayer Academy; Y. M. 
C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; La Petite Academic 2, 3, 4; Phi Sigma 
Iota 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

The beauty and charm of the French culture have 
been the main source of self-expression for Hub dur- 
ing his years at Bates. 






:•;««;''■*» 




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CLIFTON WHITTIER JACOBS, 

Auburn, Me. 



A.B. 






"Once a Gentleman, always a Gentleman." 

Born October 26, 1910; Edward Little High School; 
Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Cabinet 2; Vice-President Bates 
Publishing' Association 4; Ivy Hop Committee 3; The 
Band 1. 2; Macfarlane Club 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Glee 
Club 3, 4, Manager 4; Phil-Hellenic 4; Outing Club 1, 
2, 3, 4; Captain Tennis 2, 3, 4; Orphic Society 1, 2, 3, 
4; Pop Concert Committee 3; Ivy Day Committee 3. 

Jake almost single handed has kept tennis a 
recognized sport here at Bates. His high standards 
of clean sportsmanship should stand as ideals towards 
which future athletes may well aspire. On the courts 
and off, Jake has always shown himself a real gentle- 
man and the warmest of friends. 



EUGENE JAMES JEKANOSKI. B.S. 

Amherst, Mass. 

Boin February 10, 1910; Hopkins High School; Y. 
M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Jordan Scientific 3, 4; Freshman 
Football 1; Football 2. 3, 4; Baseball 2, 3, 4; Class 
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 4. 

Jake, with his sunny disposition and ever present 
smile has made many friends on both sides of the 
campus during his four years at Bates. He is a good 
athlete, a true friend, a regular fellow, and refuses 
to take himself seriously. 



ALBERT DANA JORDAN, A.B. 

Auburn, Me. 

"Let us have wine and women, mirth and laughter." 

Born August 3, 1908; Edward Little High School; 
Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Class 
Basketball 1, 2. 

Conspicuous by his sailorly walk. Punk has tra- 
veled fiom Auburn to Lewiston through many a storm 
until he has found his goal. 



DWIGHT WILLIS KIMBALL, B.S. 

AVells, Me. 

"That saying which I commonl.v hear repeated — 
that time assuages sorrow." 

Born March 8, 1911; Wells High School; Y. M. C. 
A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Athletic Association 1, 2. 3, 4; Deutscher 
Verein 3, 4; Jordan Scientific 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Assistant in Mathematics 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Dwight is the personification of energy and vigor. 
His four years of diligent pursuit of knowledge of 
the sciences, mathematics especially, have been pro- 
ductive of an intellectual background bound to carry 
him far in future years. 



■i^x'sttaaBmiiim 



PAGE FIFTY-EIGHT 




THE 

19 32^'^ - -' 



. .>.a..«.JiUl 




IRVILL COURTNER KING. A.B. 

Saco, Me. 

"For every why he had a whyfore." 

Born January 31, 1905; Thornton Academy; Glee 
Club 2; Cosmos Club 1. 2, 3, 4; Track 1. 2, 3, 4; Outing- 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

In spite of the depth of most of Irv's study mate- 
rials, he managed to struggle to the surface for the 
most of the time and become a philosopher of the 
most practical kind. 




EDWARD B. KLAIN, A.B. 

Portland, Me. 

Born September 8, 1910; Boys' High School, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

This fellow has been kept so busy by Pa Gould 
and his woik on the Sun-Journal downtown that he 
has not had time to let us become very well acquaint- 
ed with him. The people who know him say that he 
is always ready to do a favoi', and that not the least 
among his accomplishments is the fine ability to pre- 
dict government writtens two days in advance. 



ERNEST WYATTE KNOX, B.S. 

New York City 

"Bourne on the wings of flight." 

Born July 7, 1908; Stuvvestant High School; Y. M 
C. A. 1. 2; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; Deutscher Verein 4 
Lawrance Chemical 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3. 4 
Freshman Football; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

Billy took over the job of being Bates' best dash 
man his fiist year and has held it ever since. We 
attribute Billy's success on the track to his ability 
to keep from running too long in one place and his 
success as a chem student to hard and persistent 
work. 



ROBERT LaBOYTEAUX. B.S. 

East Orange, N. J. 

"Three the long way for LaBoyteaux." 

Born October 17, 1908; East Orange High School; 
Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3. 4, Cabinet 3, 4; Mirror Staff 4; 
Bates Student 2, 3, 4, Business Manager 4; Varsity 
Club 4; Sophomore Hop 2; Junior Cabaret 3; Ivy Hop 
3; Heelers 1, 2, 3. 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Assistant 
in Physics 4; Cheer Leader 2, 3, 4. 

He is our Cheer Leader, Librarian, Business Man- 
ager and Jack-of-All-Trades. Whenever a good idea 
is lacking or a bit of life is needed, up pops Bob and 
the job is half done. We feel that Bob is sure to 
make a go of whatever he may choose for a life work. 






•"■UB^iS-i^SV^Ni'l v.w. 



PAGE FIFTY-NINE 




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"^TK' 







ROSEMARY LAMBERTSON. A.B. 

Goihairi, ,Me. 
"Tlie race by vigor is won." 

Born February 14, 1911: Gorham High School; Y. 
AV. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4: Bates Student 2 ; W. A. A. Board 
2, 3, 4, Class Representative 2, 4; Manager of Hockey 
3: Women's Politics 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Women's Director of Cabins and Winter Sports 4; 
Tennis 1, 2; Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1. 2. 3. 4; 
Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Archery 1, 2; Numerals 1; "B" 
Sweater 3; Varsity Hockey 2, 3; Varsity Baseball 2, 
3; Varsity Basketball 3; Varsity Soccer 3: Captain of 
Hockey 2; Captain of Basketball 3, Garnet Leader 4; 
A\'inter Carnival Queen 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival Cup 
2; Freshman Initiatiim Committee 2; Back-to-Bates 
Xight Committee 3: Cheer Leader 3, 4; Dining Room 
Committee 1; Freshman Commission 1; Delegate to 
Colby Play Day 4; Bates Play Day Committee 3; 
p''reshman Registration Committee 3; Red Cross Life 
Saving Corps Exaininer 3, 4; Instructor in Swimming, 
Auburn Y. W. C. A. 2, 3, 4; Student Coach 3. 

Want to see how a hockey goal should be made, 
or watch a good figure eight on the ice, or admire 
a peifect tennis sei've? Just watch Rosie, she's one 
of (lUi- expei'ts in any and all athletic lines. 

KATHERINE ILENE LaMONTAGNE, A.B. 

Lewiston, Me. 
"Life's a pleasant institution. 
Let us take it as it comes." 
Born July 14, 1910; Jordan High School; La 
Petite Academic 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Lambda Alpha 

1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Kay is one led head without a flaming temper to 
match. Happy go lucky Kay has won many friends 
by the evenness of her dispcjsition. 

EDITH MARY LERRIGO, A.B. 

Larchmont, N. Y. 
"For strong souls 

Live like fire-hearted suns; to spend their strength 
In furthest striving action." 

Born September 20, 1910; Vermont Academy, Sax- 
ton's River, Vermont; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 

2, Vice-President 3, President 4, Freshman Commis- 
sion 1; Bates Mirror, Debating Editor 4; Bates Stu- 
dent 1; Varsity Debating 1, 2, 3, 4; Debating Council 
1. 2, 3, 4, Women's Secretary 3, Vice-President 4; 
Delta Sigma Rho 3, 4; Heelers 2, 3, 4; Cosmos Club 

1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2; Phil-Hellenic 2, 3, 4; Alethea 

2, 3, Vice-President 2; Outing Club 1. 2, 3, 4; Fresh- 
man I'rize Speaking; Freshman Prize Debate, Best 
Speaker; Sophomore Prize Speaking; Junior Exhibi- 
tion, First Prize; Ivy Day Speaker 3; Assistant in 
Argumentation 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; 
Soccer 1, 2. 3; Hockey 2, 3; Baseball 2, 3; Numerals 2; 
Council on Religion 4; Disarmament Council 4; In- 
ternational Student Service Conference 4. 

Larry's college life has had a wide application, 
for not only is she identified with the biggest campus 
affairs but she also has vital contacts with city folks. 
Despite all the honois she gets, nothing can turn 
Edith's head or change her from the good-hearted, 
good-natured girl that she is. 

MASHE UDA LABE LIGHTMAN. A.B. 

Lowell, Mass. 

Born October 13, 1908; Lowell High School; Y. M. 
C. A.; Athletic Association; Varsity Club; Phil-Hel- 
lenic; Outing Club; Prize Speaking 1, 2; "Tennis 1, 2, 

3, Manager 4. 

I\Iashe has impressed us all by his diligence, 
friendliness, coopeiative spirit, and eagerness. These 
qualities will carry him through in later life, we 
trust, as they have in college. 



PAGE SIXTY 




THI F 

fill |932^"^i^ 









WALTER KENNETH LINDSEY, B.S. 

Jonesboro, ile. 

"Nothing- is so difficult, but that it may be found 
out by seeking." 

Born October 5, 1902; Jonesboro High School; Y. 
M. C. A. 1, 2; Outing Club 1, 2, 4. 

Quietness combined with an insatiable quest of 
learning are Walt's chief characteristics. 



RALPH E. A. LONG, B.S. 

Waltham. JIass. 

"Thei'e's a little spot in Ireland." 

Born November 17, 1906; Waltham High School; 
Student Council 4; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 2, 
3; Choir 2, 3; Outing Club 2, 3; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Liberal Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Red was our best football man. He had decided 
ideas on many subjects and presented them boldly. 
And there was always a good time when Red was 
around. 




C. RUSHTON LONG. A.B. 

I'liiladelphia, Pa. 

Born March 24, 1909; Pheonixville High School; 
Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Chairman Social Problems Com- 
mittee 4; Bates Student 3, 4; Athletic Association 1, 2. 
3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2; Cosmos Club 3, 4; Phil-Hellenic 
3, 4, President 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3 4; Track 1, 2. 
3, 4. 

Rush has distinguished himself by his service dur- 
ing the last four years that we have known him. He 
has always been ready to lend himself to any task 
that needed an extra hand. We wish you the very 
best of good luck after your graduation. Rush. 







MARGARET JANE MacBRIDE, A.B. 

Lubec, Ale. 

"She has that certain Something." 

Born May 21, 1910; Lubec High School; Y. W. C. A. 
1, 2, 3, 4; Deutscher Verein 4; Alethea 2, 3; Outing 
Club 1, 2, 3, Junior Director 4; Junior Girls' Dance 
3; Senior Giils' Dance 4; Honor Student in English; 
Numerals 2. 

Although Peg is somewhat studious and very in- 
terested in English, she still has some time to devote 
to the other- side of the campus. She is the girl with 
the musical laugh that is the envy of many an occu- 
pant of Rand. 




PAGE SIXTY-ONF 




THE -T^BP .^l^iJ^i 




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ESTHER FERNALD JACKSON, A.B. 

Madison, N. H. 

"A trick of thought that fit.s in well with thine." 

Born August 22, 1911; Madison High School; Y. W. 
C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Music Committee 2; Social ("omniittee 
tary 3; La Petite Academic 3, 4; Phi Sigma Iota 3, 4; 
Outing Club 1, 2. 3, 4; Hockey 2, 3, 4; Baseball 3, 4; 
S(jccer 2, 3, 4; Numerals 2. 

Jack is a good pal; always willing to do a favor 
or help a friend. She is a good sport too, as keen a 
player as substitute as on the first team. 



GEORGE STANLEY MCCARTHY. B.S. 

Lewiston, Me. 

"Modesty is the graceful charm of vivacious youth." 

Born April 15, 1909: Staunton Military Academy; 
Jordan Scientific 3, 4: Outing Club 1, 2. 3. 4. 

It will be a very certain wager that Mac will 
capitalize successfully the knowledge he has acquired 
in college, for this fellow is a practical, seiious man. 



RAY EMMETT McCLUSKEY. B.S. 

Houlton, Me. 

Born October .5. 1910; Houlton High School; Stu- 
dent Council 1, 2. 3, 4; Athletic Association, Vice- 
President 3, President 4; Athletic Council 3, 4; Var- 
sity Club 2, 3, 4, President 4; Phil-Hellenic 3: Assist- 
ant in Physics 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Hockey 1, 2, 3, 
Captain 4; Football 2, 3, 4; Garnet Key 2; Outing Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; College Club; Phi Beta Kappa. 

Mac is the man who has carried through all his 
college work with honor. He was up with the leaders 
whether in the classroom, student activities, or ath- 
letics. 



NORMAN MacDONALD, A.B. 

Fall River, Mass. 

"Looking at it logically — " 

Born September 1. 1910; Durfee High School; Var- 
sity Debating 1, 2, 3. 4; Debating Council 1, 2, 3, 4, 
President 4: Delta Sigma Rho 3, 4; Delegate to East- 
ern Intercollegiate Debating Conference 3; Politics 
Club 3, 4, President 4; Student Disarmament Council 
4; Peisonal Editor "Mirror"; Bates Student Staff 4; 
Sports Editor Bates Alumnus 4; Athletic Association; 
Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; Ivy Hop Committee; Football 2, 
3, 4; Baseball 1, 2; College Club. 

This Mac was a quiet man except in debate. His 
logic is keen and acute, and this probably accounts 
for his success as quarterback. He carried out skill- 
fully many and varied college duties. 



PAGE SIXTY-TWO 




THE 

- = ^ 1932 



Ik 



MURIEL MARY MACLEOD, A.B. 

Lewiston, Me. 
"A dry jest, sir; I liave them at my fingers' end." 

Born October 31, 1910; Jordan High School; Y. W. 
C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Music Committee 2; Social Committee 
3, 4; Freshman Dance Committee; Sophomoie Dance 
Committee; Pop Concert Committee 4; Lambda Alpha 
Tea Dance Committee 4; Macfarlane Club 2, 3, 4; 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; La Petite Academie 2, 3, 4; Phi 
Sig-ma lota 3, 4; Secretary 4; Lambda Alpha 1, 2, 3, 
4; Alethea 2. 3; Outing Club 1, 2, 3. 4; Prize Speaking 
1, 2. 

If travel broadens the mind Muriel should be 
very broad-minded by now. At least once a year 
she has left us to travel far and wide, but we've 
always been able to reclaim her. We bet the spark- 
ling wit of this bonnie scotch lass has won many 
hearts abroad as it has done at Bates. 



GERALDINE LOUISE MALOON, A.B. 

East Auburn, Me. 

"My heart Is like a singing bird." 

Born June 22, 1910; Edward Little High School; 
Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, World Fellowship Committee 3, 
4; Cosmos Club 1. 2, 3, 4; Politics Club 4; Outing Club 

1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis 1, 2; Winter Sports 1, 2, 3; Volley- 
ball 1, 2. 3; Archery 2, 3. 

If there's a joke you'd like to get across, see Gerry. 
She'll get it every time. Gerry has turned over a new 
leaf and is sticking to that Page now. More power 
to her! We all envy your happy frame of mind and 
ticklish laughter, Gerry. 

BETTY MANN, A.B. 
Auburn, Me. 

"A tender heart, a will inflexible." 
Born April 11, 1911; Edward Little High School; 
Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Senior Girls' Dance Committee; 
Lambda Alpha Dance Committee 4; Macfarlane Club 
3, 4; Glee Club 2, 3, 4; La Petite Academie 3, 4: 
Lambda Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Campus Night 
Committee 2; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

For the last four years evei-ything has been 
"Jake" with Betty, and sure she is "jake" with the 
class of '32. Her gentleness, her smiles, and her con- 
tagious good spirits have made a place in our hearts 
no one can ever fill but Betty. 

PARKER MANN, A.B. 

Auburn, Me. 
"It's about time I went to work." 
Born December 25, 1909; Hebron Academy; Y. M. 
C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Bates Mirror Staff, Athletic Editor; 
The Bates Student 3, 4, Sports Editor 4; Class Treas- 
urer 4; Hop and Dance Committees, Chairman of Ivy 
Hop Committee, Senior Dance Committee; 4A Players 

2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Heelers 1; Band 1, 2; Mac- 
farlane Club 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Freshman Prize Debate, Winning Team; Ivy Day 
Speaker, Toast to Co-eds; Class Basketball 3, 4; 
Inter-dormitory Basketball 3, 4; Orphic Society 1, 2, 
3. 

Parker prides himself on two things. The first 
indicates conscientiousness and devotion to duty — 
he has never in four years missed a Glee Club tiip. 
The second indicates a large measure of the social 
qualities and a devotion to — well, Parker is a past 
master of coeducation. But just to prove his inde- 
pendent spirit, he became president of the Post-Easter 
sans femme society. 







PAGE SIXTY-THREE 






THE 



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IRENE ANGELIA MANSON, A.B. 

Calais, Me. 

"Hang- Sorrow! Care'll kill a cat." 

Born October .31. 1910; Calai.'s Academy; Sodalita.s 
Latina .3, 4; Aletliea 2, 3; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, .3, 4; Out- 
ing- Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

For a good .story, the tune of the latest song, the 
very newest tidbit that is circulating about the 
campus, Irene can always be depended upon. Yet 
she lightly expiesses opinions worthy of the most 
serious-minded in casual conversation and proves her- 
self an expert at laughing away the blues. 





ROBERT STONE MANSON. A.B. 

Gaidiner, Me. 

"Words, words, words." 

Born July 13. 1910; Gardiner High School; Y. M. 
C. A. 1, 2, Cabinet 3, 4; Business Manager of Jlirror; 
The Bates Student 3. 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

The big business man of the class. Bob has a weak- 
ness for being definite about business matters. He 
still claims that the Mirror business would have been 
terrible if he had not been manager. Bob has a very 
ciuiet nature and has gone through his four years 
without the least trouble to the faculty. Those in 
the know grin when they think that Bob was Class 
Sleepy Head his Junior year. 



GWENDOLYN KATHERINE MAXWELL, A.B. 

Mexico, ile. 

"He that has patience may compass anything." 

Born March 4. 1910; Jordan High School; Y. W. 
C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; 4A Players 3, 4; Ramsdell Scientific 3, 
4: Lambda Alpha 1; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; First 
Teams, Hockey 4; Baseball 4; Volleyball 3, 4. 

Gwen, oui- little math shark, goes about her work 
in a careful, cheerful way, ever busy, ever eager to 
lielp. Costumes for those 4A plays must be obtained, 
and Gwen is always right at hand. 







FRANKLIN JONES MAYBURY, A.B. 

Seymour, Conn. 

"On witli tiie dance." 

Born June 10, 1909; Seymour High School; Y. M. 
C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3. 
4; Hockey 1; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 4. 

One should not infer from the quotation that Frank 
is only just a gigolo. His abilities qualify him for 
more serious activities. 



PAGE SIXTY-FOUR 




Ml£tfoi5 

IQ32 






ABE WALLACE MANDELSTAM, B.S. 

"\Va--al now, coach." 

Born January 2, l!t09: Farmington High School; 
sity Club: Heelers; Jordan Scientific 3, 4; Outing Club; 
Prize Speaking 1, 2, 3; Ivy Day Speaker, Gifts to 
Women; Football 2, 3, 4; Orphic Society. 

Ease in speaking, his sculptured blond wave, and 
an athlete's body give Abe success in persuasion, in 
the local social whirl, and on the gridiron. 




OSCAR GUSTAVE MILLER. B.S. 

South Poland, Me. 

"Strength speeds the feet, but knowledge aims the 

bow, 
And where the one just begins the race. 
The arrows of the other cleave the goal." 

Born October 1, 1910; Edward Little High School; 
Deutscher Verein 4; Lawrance Chemical Society 3, 4; 
Assistant in Chemistry 3, 4. 

Oscar is a quiet, industrious chemist. 




WALTER KENNETH MILLER, A.B. 

Bangor, Me. 

"Ring in the nobler modes of life 
With sweeter manners, purer laws." 

Born November 18, 1903; Bangor Theological Sem- 
inary; Glee Club 3; Choir 3; Outing Club 3, 4; Honor 
Student in Psychology 4. 

The keen, philosophical intellect of this student 
makes us certain that his congregations in Deering 
never fall asleep in the middle of his sermons. 



LEONARD MILLEN. A.B. 

Maiden, JIass. 

"Let me play the lion too; I will roar that I will 
do any man's heart good to hear me." 

Born October 2, 1910; Maiden High School; Bates 
Mirror Staff; Band 3; Deutschei' Verein 2, President 
4; Politics Club 4; Freshman Prize Debate; Orphic 
Society 2; Delta Phi Alpha; Maine Economic Confer- 
ence. 

Lenny tackled everything with great care and 
exactness. He is a practical man and speaks with 
assurance on political and economic subjects. He is 
a good language student; he writes poetry — in Ger- 
man. 





PAGE SIXTY-FIVE 




THE 



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932 







'Vji-N 



ELMER F. MITCHELL 

LitfhHelri, .Me. 

"A Quiet word, a quiet way." 

Born September 5, 1909; Litchfield Academy: Y. :M. 
C. A.; Bates Mirror Staff; Spofford Club; Politics Club; 
Outing- Club. 

Here is a quiet, eainest fellow who has won many 
fiiends by his unassuming yet industrious demeanoi' 
on campus. Mitch has been a valuable asset to the 
org-anizations of which he has been a member through 
his readiness to assist wholeheartedly in an.v wortli- 
while projects. 

DORIS ESTHER MOONEY. A.B. 

Lancaster, N. H. 

"To love her was a liberal education." 

Born May 29. 1910; Lancaster Academy; Y. W. C. 
A. 1, 2, 3. 4, Cabinet 3, 4, Chairman Conventions Com- 
mittee 3, Chairman Music Committee 4; Freshman 
Prize Speaking Committee 1; Bates Mirror, Associate 
Editor 4; Junior Girls' Dance Committee; Senior Girls' 
Dance Committee; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Choir 3, 4. 
President 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Orphic Society 1, 
2, 3; Pop Concert Committee 4. 

Who is the charming young lady who attends all 
the debates and lectures? The casual observer miglit 
thinlt her very much interested in such scliolarly 
activities. But no, not quite thatl The young lady 
is (mly Dee reporting for the Sun and she's some 
publicity agent too. 



GEORGE DUNCAN MOORES 

St. Johns, Newfoundland 

"The richest deeds like poison-weeds 
Bloom well in prison-air; 
It is only what is good in man 
That wastes and withers there." 

Born August 24, 1902; Bangor Theological Semi- 
narv; Y. M. C. A. 4; Athletic Association 2, 3; Cosmos 
Club 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

George found his studies and ministeiial activities 
all-absorbing during his career at Bates. 




ROBERT LAWSON NESS, A.B. 

Auburn, Jle. 

"Stillness of person and steadiness of features are 
signal marks of good breeding." 

Born October 8, 1910; Edward Little High School; 
Jordan Scientific Society 3; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Track 1. 2, 3, 4; Hockey 1, 2. 

From a careful census of four years, it has been 
recorded that Bob has transported approximately six- 
teen hundred tons of students between Auburn and 
Lewiston. 



PAGE SIXTY-SIX 




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ROSAMOND DURRELL NICHOLS, A.B. 

Portland, Me. 

"You have nimble wit; 1 think it was made of 
Atalanta's heels — " 

Born June 30, 1911: Portland High School; Y. \V. 
C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Bates Mirror 4; Bates Student 1, 2. 3, 
4; W. A. A. Board 3, Head of Archery and Volleyball; 
La Petite Academie 3, 4; Phi Sigma Iota 4; Ramsdell 
Scientific 3. 4, Secretary 4; Alethea 2, 3; Outing Club 

1, 2. 3, 4; Freshman Prize Debate; Assistant in Phy- 
sical Education 3; Assistant In French 4; Hockey 1, 

2, 3; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis 1, 
2, 3; Soccer 1, 2, 3; Archery 2, 3; Numerals 1; "B" 
Sweater 3. 

Roz is clever and gets anything and everything 
that is assigned to her done in double-quick time. 
Ever since her Freshman year she has surprised us 
with her ingenuity which manifests itself in her 
activities of work or play. 

HAROLD B. NORTON, B.S. 

Bartlett, N. H. 
"The true test of ability is accomplishment." 

Born December 11, 1911; Fryeburg Academy; Y. M. 
C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Lawrance 
Chemical 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Assistant 
in Chemistry 3, 4; Cross Country 1; Track 1, 3. 4: 
Chase Hall Committee 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Norton is another of our classmates who by choos- 
ing a chemistry major has forced himself into seclu- 
sion. Outside of the laboratory his quietness and effl- 
ciency have shown us why he has held an assistant- 
ship in chemistry for the past two years. 

HOWARD EDGAR PAIGE, A.B. 

Lynn, ilass. 
"The more they gazed the more the wonder grew. 
That one small head could carry all he knew." 

Born January 3, 1910; Lynn Classical High School; 
Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, President 3, 4; Sophomore Banquet 
Committee; Macfarlane Club 2, 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Choir 1, 2, Monitor 3, 4; Cosmos Club 2, 3, 4; Phil- 
Hellenic 3; Deutscher Verein 2; Outing Club 1, 2, 3. 
4; Ivy Day Prayer; Council on Religion 4; Garnet 
Revelers 3, 4; Assistant in Biblical Literature 2, 3, 4, 
Honor Student in Biblical Liteiature 4. 

Such is Howie — the Deacon of the Monastery. All 
agree that he can get away with more stuff than any 
other fellow in college. 

When we look at Howie we always think of a 
young sage — he is such a bright appearing lad. 
Howie reveled in harmony as many of the Monks will 
grudgingly admit, and those who heard the Revelers 
will always remember that deep tone coming from 
such a small person. 



GRACE PAGE, A.B. 

Alton N. H. 
"Procrastination is the thief of time." 

Born November 23, 1911; Alton High School; Stu- 
dent Government Board 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Bates Mirror, Women's Athletic Editor; La Petite 
Academie 3, 4; Phil-Hellenic 2, 3, 4; Social Committee 
Chairman 3; Program Committee Chairman 4; Phi 
Sigma Iota 4; Alethea 3; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4" 
Freshman Prize Debate; Freshman Greek Prize- 
Numerals 2; Soccer 2; Volleyball 2. 

This page is too small for all the nice things we'd 
like to say about Greg. Let it suffice for us to hint 
that she is a good pal, a responsible worker in many 
campus activities, and an expert in painless time 
killing. 




PAGE SIXTY-SEVEN 




,- Vi.'ii,..L.„.u.ii,:,||,..^ 



Mim^oi^ 



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VIRGINIA MILLS, A.B. 

Farniington, Me. 

"And I oft have lieard defended, — 
Little said is soonest mended." 

Born January 2, 1909; Farmington Higli School; 
Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Alethea 2; Outing- Club 1, 2. 3. 
4, Director 3, Junior Body 4; Entre Nous 1; A'ollevball 
3; Track 1. 2; "W^inter Carnival Committee 3; Play 
Day Committee 3. 

Jinny always has plenty of time for pleasure even 
if she does take hard courses of study. She knows 
the art of mixing' work with pleasure, with satisfac- 
tory results. 



LAWRENCE C. PARKER. A.B. 

Aiibuin. .Me. 

Born August 24, 1910; Edward Little High School; 
Debating Council 2, 3, 4; Freshman Prize Debate; 
Sophomoie Piize Debate; Varsity Debating 3, 4; Man- 
ager of Debating 4; Winter Sports 2; Mirror Staff 4; 
Delta Sigma Rho. 

This blond debater, debate manager, psychologist, 
and what have you, has made a permanent niche in 
the memorial to Bates 1932 personalities. He smiles 
and acts friendliness, and is always willing to be 
obliging and helpful. It is said that Brooks Quimby 
was nonplussed when Lary was not around to enter- 
lain visiting women debaters. 



JOHN PHILLIPS, B.S. 

Andover, Mass. 

Born May 9, 1909; Runchard High School; Jordan 
Scientific Society 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 
1. 2, 3. 4; Football 1; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 
:i, 4: Basketball 1, 2. 3, 4. 

Johnny put things over — the plate on the baseball 
lirld and in other college activities. 



ANNIE VIOLA PROCTOR, A.B. 

North Windham, Me. 

"The point is as plain as a pike staff." 

Born May 15. 1910; Windham High School; Fresh- 
man Piize Speaking; Alethea 2, 3; Sodalitas Latina 
:'.. 4: Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1. 2, 3. 4. 

Quiet, unassuming-, self possessed, and self con- 
fident, Anne tackles a difficult thesis paper and plays 
a sure no tiump hand with equal unpertuibed assur- 
ance. 



PAGE SIXTY-EIGHT 




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_ix. ... __i 



WENDELL AUGUSTUS RAY, B.S. 

Auburn, Me. 

"That great man is he who in the midst of the 
crowd keeps with perfect sweetness tlie independence 
of solitude." 

Born October 7. IfllO; Edward Little Higli Selioul; 
Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Deutscher Verein 4; Lawrance 
Chemical Society 3, 4, Program Committee 4; Outing 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Honor Student, Chetnistry: Assistant- 
ships, Mathematics 2, 3, 4, and Cheinistry 4; Delta 
Phi Alpha: General Scholarship Prize 2, 3; Coe 
Scholarship; Prize Membership to American Chemical 
Society; Phi Beta Kappa. 

There is no doubt that diligence gets its reward. 
Wendell has made his home in the chemistry labora- 
tory for four years. We expect great enrichments 
from his research woi'k in the field. 



MARGARET WARD RENWICK, A.B. 

Auburn, Me. 

"Fire that's closest kept bui-ns nKJst of all." 

Born March 21, 1910: E'. L. H. S. ; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. 
3, 4, Cabinet 3: Macfarlane Club 3, 4; La Petite Acad- 
emic 4; Lambda Alpha 1, 2: Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Tennis 1, 2; Volleyball 1, 2, 3. 

Margaret, so tall and stately, so sweet and neat, 
always seems quiet and unassuming, but wait till 
you know her. Lender that exterifir there is a wealth 
of true friendsliip and undeistanding. It is rumored 
that Margaret always has harbored the best eats in 
Rand. 



MERRILL E. RICHARDSON. B.S. 

Pawtucket, R. I. 

Born March 20, 1909; Pawtucket High School: 
Lawrance Chemical Society 3, 4: Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 
4, Director 3, 4; Assistant in Chemistry 3, 4; Y. M. C 
A. 1, 2. 3, 4. 

The golf links, the chemical laboratory, and the 
scenes of social functions indoors and out were Rich's 
favored environments. And his intimates call him 
much at home in all three. 



JOSEPH G. RIDDLE. JR., A.B. 

New York City 

Born May 27, 1909; George Washington High 
School; Y. M. C. A. 3, 4; Outing Club 3, 4. 

We noticed, when Pi-exy read the honors list last 
March, that Joe's name was among those mentioned 
So we know that this quiet fellow has made good use 
of his time, and that probably his professors could 
tell more about him than we can. He has impressed 
us as being serious, friendly and likeable 




PAGE SIXTY-NINE 




THE 

' '■ ' ~ 1932 




■^^m^^^m^^^^ai^ ^ 



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MILDRED BEATRICE ROBERTSON. A.B. 

Auburn, Jle. 

"Silence sweeter is than speech." 

Born October 27, 1909; Edward Little High School; 
Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Sodalitas Latina 4; Lambda 
Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Quiet, pleasant, Mildred has proved herself to be 
a fine spoit, and a cheerful co-workei-. 




ELEANOR BRADFORD ROBIE, A.B. 

Auburn, Jle. 

"Governed by a strain of music." 

Born November 4, 1911; Edward Little High School; 
Macfarlane Club 3, 4; Glee Club 2, 3, 4; IJeutscher 
\'iitin 4; Lambda Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Eleanor is pleasant and fiiendly at all times. 
Her ability to play the piano has been much appre- 
ciated by the Glee Club and by all her friends. We 
wonder if the soothing charms of music aided in pro- 
ducing that even disposition. 




LOUIS KAPPEL ROVELLI. B.S. 

Danbury, Conn. 

Born December Ifi, 1909; Uanbuiy High School; 
Jordan Scientific 4; Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4 ; Outing Club 
1, 2. 3. 4; Sophomore Hop Committee; Junior Cabaret 
('(immittee; Track 1; Winter Sports 1, 2, 3. 

Lcniie, the scientific man, at peace with the world, 
smiling, and popular. 




CLARENCE SAMPSON. B.S. 

Dexter, Me. 

Born April 12, 1909; Bridgton Academy; Y. M. C. 
A.; Jordan Scientific; Outing Club; Track 2, 3. 4. 

Sammie is another one of those fellows who divide 
their time between the gym and Carnegie. His good 
work in both places has given him a fine reputation. 



PAGE SEVENTY 




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HAROLD HENCKEL. B.S. 

"Worcester, Mass. 

Born July 5, 1S99; Worcester High School; Jordan 
Scientific Society 3, 4; Glee Club 1; Manager Band :i. 

It would be very appropriate to say that this fel- 
low goes at his chosen profession — that of medicine — 
"with love and zeal". No one more than Haiokl is 
willing to describe to the curious uninitiated just the 
puipose of all the apparatus over in the Biology Labs 
or to e.xplain a fine job of dissecting. 

ELIZABETH PAULINE SEIGEL. A.B. 

North Plymouth, .Mass. 

"A willing hand and a loyal heart." 

Born November 27, l!i09; Kingston High School; 
Student Government Board 4; House Council 1, 4; Y. 
W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Publicity Committee 2, Cabinet 3, 
.Social Service Committee 4; Politics Club 3. 4. Pro- 
giam Committee 3, 4, Vice-president 4; Deutscher 
Verein 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Delta Phi Alpha 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4; Play 
Day Committee 3; Assistant in German 3, 4; Assistant 
in Sociology 4; Bates Student 1, 2, 3, 4; Bates Mirroi- 
4; Lambda Alpha 2; Hockey 1, 2; Hiking 2; Soccer 1; 
Tennis 1, 2; Winter Spoi'ts 1, 2; Volleyball 1, 2, 3; 
Numerals 3. 

Elsie started in being helpful right at the begin- 
ning by printing- the signs we wore fo)- initiation, 
and she hasn't stopped since. Posters for the "Y" 
pictures for our walls, decorations for parties — Elsie 
surely is a help and she is good-natured and depend- 
able about it all, too. 

ORLANDO F. SCHOFIELD. B.S. 
Danbury, Conn. 

Born February 10, 1909; Danburv High School; 
Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Heeleis 
Club 1, 2; 4A Players 3, 4; Business :\Ianager, 4A 
Players 4; Commencement Hop Committee. 

Scho had a "way with him" which made people 
like him. He was happy-go-lucky, whimsical, and 
care-free. His success as a business manager of the 
4A Players ought to indicate that qualities of serious 
attention to business detail and efficiency will make 
him a valuable Bates c(jntribution to life outside the 
campus. 



ANNE ELIZABETH TAYLOR. A.B. 

Paunford, ,Me. 

"Gentle in manner, firm in reality." 

Born November 6, 1910; Stephens High School; Y. 
W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, "World Fellowship ("ommittee 3. 4; 
Cosmos Club 2, 3, 4, Piogram Committee 4; Phil- 
Hellenic 2, 3, 4, Secretaiy-Treasurei- 3, Social Com- 
mittee 4; Sodalitas Latina 4, Piogram Committee 4; 
Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Debate 2; Assistant in 
Latin 4; Hockey 1, 2; Soccer 1, 2; Volleyball 1, 2; 
Winter Sports 1, 2. 

We don't hear much from Libby but her actions 
speak for themselves. We envy her even disposition 
and her fine manners. She has a good scholastic 
record and has done a lot of extra-cuiricular work. 



:>:n 




PAGE SEVENTY-ONE 




THE ™""3» 
5 t * ; 1932 



Af'iinii. "Mt 



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'■*!^ 




IVA MARIAN SMITH, A.B. 

Augusta, Me. 

"To lengtlien to the last a sunny mood." 

Born October 26, 1909: Cony Hig-h School; Y. V/. 
C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4: Bates Student 1, 2; "W'. A. A. Board 2, 
Class Representative; Alethea 3; Outing Club 1. 2, 
3, 4; Hockey 1, 2, 4; Basketball 1. 2, 3; Baseball 4; 
Soccer 2, 3, 4. 

When everyone else is blue and disagreeable you 
can bet on at least one person having a good-natured 
disposition and she's always ready to help out any 
others in trouble. Here's wishing you a double dose 
of good fortune from now «n. JIarian. 



BERNARD N. SPRAFKE. 
-Meriden, Conn. 



A.B. 



Born April IC. 19- 



Meriden High School; Y. M. 



Manager. Assistant 
Macfarlane Club 3, 
Outing Club; Foot- 
Ivy Day Committee; 



C. A.; Miiror Staff. Circulation 
Personal Editor; Pop Concert 4; 
4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, President 4; 
ball 4; Baseball 1, 2; Track 3. 4; 
Garnet Key; Garnet Revelers. 

The variety and success of Bernie's campus inter- 
ests reveal the nnan of more than ordinary ability. 
He was always a one man argument foi- varsity 
basketball. Music was perhaps his chief interest and 
he took time for his studies also. 



FRANCES EVELYN STEVENS. A.B. 
Lewiston, Me. 
"Some think this world is made for fun and frolic, 
And so do I." 

Born May 30, 1910; Jordan High School; Y. \V. C. 
A. 1. 2, 3, 4; Junior Girls' Dance Cominittee; Lambda 
Alpha Dance Committee 3; Chairman Lambda Alpha 
Tea Dance 4; Macfarlane Club 3, 4; La Petite Acad- 
emie 3, 4; Lainbda Alpha 1, 2. 3, 4; Baseball 4. Cap- 
tain 4; Basketball 4; Orphic Society 3, 4. 

Who always rushes late to classes, who always 
talks loudest and fastest? Steve, of course. Her 
bustling spirit and gay chatter promise to liven up 
any party or coiner. That's why her corners are 
always so crowded with eager friends. 



CHRISTINE WALKER STONE, A.B. 

Orange, Mass. 

"Endued with sanctity of reason." 

Born January 9, 1910; Orange High School, Howard 
Seminary; Student Government 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 
3, 4; Ivy Hop Committee 3; Junior Girls' Dance Com- 
mittee 3; Heelers 1; 4A Players 2. 3, 4, Costume Mis- 
tress 3, 4; Ramsdell Scientific 3, 4; Volleyball 2; 
Track 1; Class Numerals 2; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Rand Hall President 4; Assistant Chairman Y. W. C. 
A. Bazaar 3, Chairman of Bazaar 4. 

Ideas just grow in Crit's biain. Costumes and 
bazaars are alike, favored with her originality, and 
success is assured with Crit as manager. But you 
don't know Crit until you have seen her clever 
sketches. 



PAGE SEVENTY-TWO 




THE _ _ 

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GEORGE ELLIS STONE. A.B. 

Auburn, ile. 

"It matters not what men assume to be; 

Or good, or bad, they are but what they are." 

Born February 10, 1910; Edward Little High 
School; Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3, 4: Outing Club 1. 2. 3, 4; 
Baseball 2; Basketball, Class 2, Dormitory League 3, 
4; Track 3, 4. 

A clean player on the basketball floor, George is 
a fellow who never complains. 




DOROTHY FRANCES SULLIVAN. A.B. 

I Iff ri iig, ile. 

"The trick of singularity." 

Born April 19, 1908; Deering High School: Y. W. 
C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Bazaar Committee 1; Senior Girls' 
Dance Cominittee; Junior Girls' Dance Committee; La 
Petite Academie 4: Deut.'^clier Verein 3, 4; Phi Sigma 
Iota 4; Outing Club 1, 2. 3. 4; Hockey 1, 2. Captain 
1; Soccer 1, 2; Baseball 2. 

Dot's different, and that is quite a trick these days. 
Who but Dot could study when there is a crowd 
around or who but Dot could be witty enough to 
brighten our darkest hours? Wherever she i.s tliere 
is true companionship and a good time. 




PAUL SWAN, B.S. 

Hartford, Conn. 

"He is not dead; he sleepeth." 

Born July 3, 1908; Hebron Academy; Mirror Staff 
4; The Student 1, 2, 3; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3; Outing Club 
1, 2, 3. 

Paul has always reminded us of a little old man — 
he is always so sincere and impenetrable. He cannot 
be accused of pushing himself to the forefront. In 
fact he is quite well known for his gentleness — a 
perfect dove. But his slow, smooth manner lias 
always managed to break through the strongest de- 
fense. 



CAROL MAE SYLVESTER. A.B. 

Presque Isle, Me. 

"A mind, lively and ardent, frank and kind." 

Born April 30, 1909; Presque Isle High School; Y. 
W. C. A. 1. 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 4: Politics Club 3, 4; 
Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4: Freshman Nominating Com- 
mittee; Assistant in Education 4. 

Although she has been an Aroostook school 
teacher, Carol doesn't seem to have lost any of her 
love for fun through the experience. Anyone will 
tell you that Carol's sense of humor is an addition 
to any party. 





PAGE SEVENTY-THREE 




15 11 1932 




tfi-A^^. 





OTIS BENSON TIBBETTS. B.S. 

Colombia Falls, Me. 

"A quiet mind is Nature's greatest gift to man." 

Born October 1.3, 1909; Colombia Falls High School; 
Y. il. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2. 3; Jordan Scientific 3, 
4, Secretary 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Assistant in 
Biology and Zoology 3, 4. 

Tib became married to the Biology Lab early in 
his collegiate career and has been a model husband 
ever since, spending nearly all of liis time with tlie 
lady of his choice. 



VERA BETTY TIBBETTS. A.B. 

Lewiston, ilc. 



" — I have lived — 

As if life's business were 



summer mood." 



Born June ,">, 1909; Jordan High School; Y. W. C. 
A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Sodalitas Latina 4: Lambda Alpha 1, 2, 
3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 1, 2, 3; Basketball 
1, 2; Track 1, 2, 3; Tennis 1, 2, 3; Numerals 2. 

Vera finds life a series of ethereal, fanciful bub- 
bles which are always bursting- in her face and give 
her little transcient thrills of m(jst \aried emotions. 



LEWIS NEWTON TILLSON. A.B. 

lOast Sumner, ^le. 

"Verily I say unto > ou — " 

Born November 17, 190(1; Whitman High School. 
Bangor Theological Seminal y; Athletic Association; 
Cosmos Club; Spofford Club; Outing Club. 

One might wonder when Louie finds time to com- 
pose his sermons in the midst of a busy college life. 
But his versatile, industrious personalitv jjrobably 
contains the solution. 







nP'S^' 



GERALDINE ELISABETH WILSON. A.B, 

Lawrence, .Mass. 

"Tranquility! Thou better name 
Than all the family of Fame." 

Born January 'j, 1911; Lawrence High School; Y. 
^V. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Macfarlane Club 3. 4; La Petite 
Academic 3, 4; Deutscher Verein 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Hockey 1; Volleyball 2, 3; Soccei- 1, 2; Winter 
Sports 1, 2. 

Did you ever see her get ruffled feelings? Perhaps 
her musical accomplishments have their soothing 
cliarms. Gerry has been most willing to' tickle the 
ivories when the co-eds feel like dancing or when 
club programs are needed. 



PAGE SEVENTY-FOUR 




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KERMIT RAPHAEL TRUE, A.B. 

Gardiner, Me. 

"To thine own self be true." 

Born March 3, 1910; Gardiner High School: Outing 
Club; Athletic Association. 

They tell us that reticence and quietness are be- 
coming virtues; Pete has both of them. 



PETER ROGER VALICENTI. A.B. 

East Weymouth. Mass. 

Born September 13, 1909; AVeymouth High School: 
Varsity Club 2. 3. 4: Phil-Hellenic 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Director 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Pete's good memory and brisk way of calling out 
signals on the gridiron evinces his force of person- 
ality in all phases of living. 



MILDRED ENID VINING. A.B. 

West Enfield, Me. 

"And I can listen to thee yet." 

Born May 4. 1912; Buckfleld High School: Y. W. 
C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Cosmos Club 3, 4; La Petite Academie 
4; Phi Sigma Iota 3, 4; Alethea 3; Outing Club 1, 2. 3, 
4; Freshman Prize Debate; Tennis 1, 2: Basketball 1, 
2, 3, 4; Soccer 1, 2, 3; Baseball 3; Volleyball 1, 2; 
Hockey 3. 

We have all enjoyed listening to "Jill's" gay jokes 
and laughing comments on things as they are or 
should be. 

RANDOLPH ADAMS WEATHERBEE. A.B. 

Lincoln, Jle. 

"He adorns whatever subject he either spolve or 
wrote upon, by the most splendid eloquence." 

Born December 9, 1910: Portland High School; 
Student Council, Secretary-Treasurer 3, President 4; 
Art Editor "Mirror": "Student" Staff 1, 2, 3, 4; Class 
President 1, 3. 4; Committee, Freshman Dance, Sopho- 
more Hop, Junior Cabaret, Ivy Hop, Senior Formal 
Dance; Debating Council 1, 2, 3. 4; Varsity Debating 
1, 2, 3, 4; Delta Sigma Rho 3. 4: Spofford Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Phil-Hellenic 1, 2, 3, 4; Politics Club 3, 4: Outing 
Club Director 2; Freshman and Sophomore Prize 
Speaking; Toastmaster Ivy Day; Honors Work in 
Government; College Club; Phi Beta Kappa. 

Rand has about all the qualities which make for 
more than ordinary success in college activities, and 
it is very sure that there will be a large "carry-over" 
in the occupations of life away from the campus. 
(For details see "superlatives") The fact of Rand's 
election to the Class presidency for three terms of 
office is a greater tribute of our esteem for him than 
any word-tribute can be. 




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PAGE seventy-five; 




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BENJAMIN FRANKLIN WHITE. III. B.S. 

■\Vestwood. :Ma.ss. 

"A mighty man was he." 

Born January 12, 1910; Dedham High School, Maine 
Central Institute: Student Council 2; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 
3, 4: Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; Class President 2; Football 
1, 2. 4; Hockey 1, 2, 4. 

Ben wasn't satisfied to rest on the fame that his 
blond head and masculine beauty would have brought 
him but went light ahead and distinguished himself 
on the athletic field where he met everyone as they 
came along and very seldom had to be content with 
second best. 



GERTRUDE FRANCES WHITE. A.B. 

West Lf-banon. X. H. 

"Who saw life steadily and saw it whole." 

Born April 27, 1910; West Lebanon High School; 
Secretary House Council 2; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Music Committee 3; Senior Girls' Dance Committee; 
.Macfarlane Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; Glee Club 1. 2, 3, 
4, ilanager 4; Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; Alethea 2, 3; Sophomore 
Prize Speaking 2; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pop Concert 
Committee 4. 

Trudy's salesmanship this year is the successful 
culmination of that intriguing line of hers. Oh that 
we all c(juld capitalize our natural talentsi 



NORMAN EARL WHITTEN. A.B. 

Lee. ^le. 

"The boy track star." 

Born December 18, 1911; Lee Academy; Y. M. C. 
A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Treasurer 2; 
Sophomore Hop 2; Chairman Junior Cabaret 3; Out- 
ing Club Director 1, 2, 3, 4; Sophomore Prize Speak- 
ing 2; Winter Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. Captain 4; Track 1, 2, 
3, 4, Captain 4; Cross Country 1, 2, o, 4, Captain 4: 
College Club. 

Whit is one of the "running machines" that Lee 
has given to intercollegiate competition during recent 
years. When he puts his snowshoes on there isn't a 
college iTian in the country that can stay with him 
over the two-mile course. He is the only man in col- 
lege to captain three sports in his senior year. To 
.say that he keeps in training for his extensive sports 
program only by chasing the last Main St. trolley 
would be unfair. 

DANA SAWYER WILLIAMS. A.B. 

IJorchester. Mass. 

"I must be a most fascinating young man; 

'Tis not my fault, the ladies must blame heaven." 

Born March 6. 1909: Huntington School, Boston; 
Class Treasurer 3; Vaisity Club 4; Sophomore Hop, 
Junior Cabaret, Ivy Hop, Senior Dance; Outing Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 3; Varsity 4; Track 1. 2, 3 4. 

You aie now viewing the Sheik of the ^Monastery, 
Dana is a regular Beau Brummel, and is just as much 
at home with the gills as an oyster is in the ocean. 
"Ye Gods" is a good skate and a good loser. We like 
him for the former and the Biography Club appre- 
ciates him for the latter. 



PAGE SEVCNTY-EIX 




THE 

MIRI^OI^ ^ 

■ — . 1932 



^H 






"^t: :'-":;;sf 



GERTRUDE ELIZABETH YOUNG. A.B. 

Xorlli Anson. Me. 

"She studies music I opine. 
And other mysteries divine." 

Born November 12, 1908; Anson Academy; Y. W. 
C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Macfarlane Club 3, 4; La Petite Acad- 
emie 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Gyp is very quiet, but oh what a loyal friend and 
pal she can be. Many a meal has been made more 
plea.sant because Gyp played the piano and enter- 
tained us. 




FORMER MEMBERS CLASS OF 1932 



Abbott, Clark Luce 
Abbott, Clinton John 
Barnes, David White 
Bartlett, Howard Stanley 
Barton, Roger Daniel 
Bauchmann, Frank Walter 
Bedell, Letha 
Bohlin, Herbert George 
Bonney, Raymond Francis 
Briggs, Benson Armstrong 
Brown, Ruth Gregory 
Bucknam, Nathan Arthur 
Bujold, Leo James Felix 
Burr, Lewis Haskell 
Butler, Edward Irving 
Chainey, Rudolph Earle 
Charneuse, Wadsworth 
Corbly, Elizabeth Ann 
Crandall, Thelma Utevee 
Crocker, Frances Pulsifer 
Curtis, Elizabeth Storey 
Curtis, Regena Helen 
Day, Donald Samuel 
Dow, Eleanor 
Farrell, Sidney Howard 
Finn, Jane Elizabeth 
Flaherty. Charles Foster 
Foster, Harry Kittredge 
Franklin, Benjamin Russell 



Frew, Arthur David 
Galley, Kenneth Taylor 
Gibson, Ralph Stanley 
Gilman, Raymond Delmont 
Goodkowsky, Phineas Nathan 
Gorham, Amos Richmond 
Gormley, Thomas Joseph, Jr. 
Grant, Bernard Perle 
Griffin. WilHam Austin 
Harrington, Warren Alvah 
Hobbs. Russell Atherton 
Holman, Lyman 
Huntington, Kenneth Felix 
Ingalls. Joseph Carlton 
Ingle, Rivera Carmen 
Irons, Ronald Scott 
Jacobs, Margaret Eleanor 
Jenkins, Arnold Nuttor 
Jones. Ernest Albert 
Kaplan, Harry Lawrence 
Kendal, Charles Pierce, Jr. 
King, Walter Landis 
Lake, Elwood Leroy 
Lary. John Stanton 
LaFlamme, Henry Frederick 
Lawless, Dorothy Hester 
Lovell, John Wallace 
Maclinn, Walter Arnold 
Mantelli. Elmo Peter' 



Mazonson, Morris Thornton 
Header, Dorothy Mildred 
Merrill, Walter Cushman 
MoUer, Francis George 
Mordosa, Edward Peter 
Murphy, Edward Everett 
Murphy, Joseph Francis, Jr. 
McCarthy, Dana Lewis 
McCarthy, Thomas Francis 
McKey, Gordon Wells 
Plager, Abraham 
Qualter, William Edward 
Reynolds, Richard 
Robinson, John Frank 
Ryan, William Thomas 
Sahl, Herman 
Shapiro, Harold 
Smith, Clyde Preston 
Stanley, Edith Marie 
Staren, John 
Stickney, Richard Irving 
Sutton, Gilbert Hobbs 
Vosmus, Richard Greenleaf 
Wakely, James Sidney 
Wiley, John Henry, Jr. 
Woodman, Carolyn Lane 
Worcester, Idabelle Conley 
Wright, Horace Albion 
Yates, William Henry 



PAGE SEVENTY-SEVEN 




Mim:!o[^ 

1932 




Awards Won by the Class of 1932 



General Scholarship — Freshman Year 

Shirlie E. Austin 

Charles T. Demarest, Jr. 
Sophomore Year 

E. Lucile Foulser 

Wendell A. Ray 
Junior Year 

Gertrude B. Diehl 

Wendell A. Ray 
Honor in Debate — Freshman Year 
The WiNNiNt. Team 
Men 

Parker Mann 
Clinton Dill 
Orimer E. Bugbee 
Women 

Ruth Brown 
Rosamond D. Xichols 
Edith M. Lerrijio 
Best IxDmouAL Speakers 
Orimer E. Bugbee 
Edith M. Lerrigo 
Sophomore Year 

The Winning Team 
First Division 

Harrison C. Greenleaf 
Lawrence C. Parker 



Second Division 
Shirley Cave 
Orimer E. Bugbee 

Best Individual Speakers 
Harrison C. Greenleaf 
Shirley Cave 

Excellence in Greek 

E. Lucile Foulger 
\'alery Burati 
Howard E. Paige 

Original Parts 

Jl"nior Exhibition 
Edith ^L Lerrigo 
Harrison C. Greenleaf 

Phi Beta Kappa Literature Prize 

First, Muriel F. Bliss 

Second. \'alen,- Burati 
Excellence in Public Speaking — 

V. Freshman Year 

E. Lucile Foulger 

Randolph A. Weatherbee 
Sophomore Year 

Carolyn L. Woodman 

Xorman E. Whitten 
The Coe Scholarship 

Wendell A. Rav 



Argu m entation 

Edith M. Lerrigo 

Biblical Literatlre 

E. Lucile Foulger 
Howard E. Paige 

Biology 

Aubigne Cushing 
Calvin C. Chamberlain 
Gilbert Clapperton 
Otis B. Tibbetts 

Chemistry 

Wendell A. Rav 
Oscar G. Miller 
Merrill E. Richardson 
Harold G. Norton 
Milan A. Chapin 

Economics 

Elizabeth P. Seigel 
George A. Burke 
John M. Carroll. Jr. 

Education 

Carol M. S.\U ester 

English 

Marion J. Crosby 
Ernest C. Allison 
E. Lucile Foulger 
Charles T. Demarest, 



ASSISTANTSHIPS 
French 



Tr. 



Jeannette L. Gottesfeld 
Augusta G. Cohen 
Rosamond D. Xichols 

Geology 

Ruth E. Barren 
Xorman L Douglas 

History 

Alice M. Gower 

Latin 

Gertrude B. Dichl 
Elizabeth Ta\lor 

^LvTHEMATICS 

Wendell A. Rav 

Dwight W. Kimball 
Physics 

Robert LaBoyteaux 

Ray E. McCluskey 
Physical Education for Men 

Bernard X. Sprafke 
Psychology 

Emerson F. Blodgett 
Spanish 

Elizabeth P. Seigel 



PAGE SEVENTY-EIGHT 




THE 

Ml 1^1:^01^ 

19 32-"^^^' 



i s 





HONOR STUDENTS 



Biblical Literature 

Howard Edgar Paige 

Cheiuistry 
Wendell Augustus Ray 

Economics 
George Anthony Burke 

English 

Shirley Cave 
Marion Josephine Crosby 
Charles Trumax De,marest, Jr. 
Edith Lucile Foulger 
Margaret Jane McBride 
Elmer Lloyd Mitchell 



French 

Jeannette Lenona Gottesfeld 

German 
Muriel Frances Bliss 

Historv and Government 

William Henry Dunham, Jr. 
Randolph Adams WeatherbeE 

Psychology 

Emerson Floyd Blodgett 
Walter ATiller 



PAGE SEVENTY-N1N3 



f f5!J 


aH 


—♦•Id 


SB 



THE 



MIC^I^OI^ 



9 32 ^ 



■at ^^, »teiir.JJll 





IVY DAY, Class of 1932 



Prayer 

Address by President 

Oration 

Prophecy 

Gifts to Women 

Gifts to Men 



To tlie Facnlty 
To the Co-eds 
To the Men 
To the Athletes 
To the vSeniors 



TOASTS 



Howard Paige 

Randolph W'eathkrbee 

William Dunham 

LUCILE FoULGER 

Abe Mandelstam 
Margaret Mines 



Marjorie Hriggs 

Parker AIann 

C A RoLv X Wood m a n 

( )ri.mek BugbEE 

Edith ]j:rrigo 



Tnastvwstcr. Randolph Weatherbee 
Chairman. William Dunham 
Marshal, Gilbert Clapperton 



PAGE EIGHTY 




THE '^-''-^^^^^^ « 



IVY DAY POEM 

By Lucile Foulger 

Like hrciwn interlocking arms. 

Strong ivy branches with curled and rusty-cushioned 

Fingers grip the red mortared walls. 

The winter's tempest tears away their jewelled 

Pendants ; hut with fiercer strength they cling 

And dig their sharp nails deeper in the pebbled stone. 

So may our hearts, O Bates, thruout the years 

Secure their fastenings on thy memory. 

Each year hugging tighter to the sweet strength 

Of thy great walls of thought. 



BATES SPRING SONG 

Words by Valery Burati 

Music by Gilbert Clapperton 

Come down to Bates, come down at Ivy Time 

When summer winds from the ocean blow, 

\\ hen classrooms are deserted and leisure is sublime. 

And beauty's all we think about, and all we care to know. 

Spring's tuneful symphony sounds in the trees 
When ivy grows full upon the wall ; 
Professors are beloved on festive days like these. 
And Hathorn's bell rings languidly, enchantingly to all. 

Come down to Bates, come down at Ivy Time 

When dawn and twilight are jiainted gold. 

And youthful voices mingle with one long ancient chime 

That blends the song this afternoon with melodies of old 



PAGE EIGHTY-ONE 




1932 





JUNIOR EXHIBITION, Class of 1932 



Little Theater 

PROGRAM 

"Finding- Life Through Poetry" 

"A More Liberal Attitude Toward Communism' 

"Youth Flames to a Purpose" 

"The Seen and the Unseen" 

"The Church and World Peace" 

"Heroes of Literature" 

"The Shakespearean Fallacy" 

"Idealism and French Literature" 



May 27, 1931 

Shirley Cave 

Harrison Greenleaf 

Edith Lerrigo 

\'alery Burati 

William Dunham 

Lucile Foulger 

Ernest Allison 

Tkaxxettk C.ottesfkld 



The first prize was won by Edith Lerrigo and the second prize by Harrison 
Greenleaf. 



PAGE EIGHTY-TWO 




THE 

^ J ; HQ32 - 



IK' 




PHI BETA KAPPA 



Shirlie Elizabeth Austin 
Robert Hopson Axtell 
Charles Truman Demarest, Jr. 
Gertrude Barrowclough Diehl 
Elden Herbert Dustin 
Edith Lucile Foulger 



Jeannette Lenona Gottesfeld 
Kate Rebekah Hall 
Ray E-mmett McCluskey 
Wendell Augustus Ray 
Randolph A. Weatherbee 



PAGE EIGHTY-THREE 




Mimloi^ 

^ * • . 1932 





CLASS DAY 



SPEAKERS 



Toastmaster 

Prayer 

Oration 

History 

Address to Fathers and Mothers 

Address to Halls and Campus 

Pipe Oration 

Last Will and Testament 

Class Gift 



Randolph Adams Weatherbee 

Howard Edgar Paige 

William Henry Dunham, Jr. 

Ruth Marjorie Briggs 

Edith Mary Lerrigo 

Orimer Ellsworth Bugbee 

Norman MacDonald 

Margaret Elizabeth Hines 

ValEry Burati 



Marshal, Gilbert Clappkrton 

COMMITTEE IN CHARGE 

William H. Dunham, Jr., Chainiiaii 



Norman E. W^hitten 
Edith M. Lerrigo 
Bernard N. Sprafke 
Rosemary Lambertson 



Clifton W. Jacobs 
Frances M. Cronin 
Howard E. Paige 
E. LuciLE FoULGER 



PAGE EIGHTY-FOUR 




THE 

lilt 19 32 ' "^^-^ 





The Annals of the Class of 1932 

VOLUME I. THE RISE OF THE FRESHMEN 

It was on a perfect September dav tliat two hundred and six perplexed, 
bewildered Freshmen with luggage and inquiries swarmed the Bates Campus. 
Already the spirit of Bates was at work, for our trains were met bv upper- 
classmen, and the Y. M. C. A. members were on duty at their tent to answer 
numerous questions. 

It is not necessary to bring back to our minds that 
tirst hectic week, for even now it is still vivid in our 
memories. It did not take long to get acquainted 
with those around us, for there were welcomes, lunch- 
eons, registrations, social get-to-gethers. psychology 
tests, campus inspection, unpacking, and room fur- 
nishing to attend to. As an end to these first days 
before classes, we all attended the traditional I-Am- 
You-Are reception in Chase Hall. No doubt, you 
still have those autographed cards in your mem books 
with the names that were so strange, but which are 
so familiar now. 

Of course the girls haven't forgotten that night of 
Freshman school when they learned then and there 
their position on this campus. The bovs were instructed as to their status 
during several performances. One of the most colorful was the pajama 
parade in which the very latest fashions in men's evening wear were put on 
display. 

The traditional Freshman class ride and picnic at the Auburn fish hatch- 
ery was an opportunity for the children of 1932 to become a real part of Bates. 
One regrettable feature was the fact that with the end of this festivity co-edu- 
cation was postponed until after Thanksgiving. 

Who wanted to co-educate anyway? By this time the boys looked imbe- 
cilic with their Freshmen caps, green ties, unmated socks, and market baskets. 
The girls were not able to portray their youthful charm either. They had 
to wear dresses wrong side to, green pantaloons, and onion necklaces. Their 
cosmetics consisted of gobs of cold cream, lipstick in the form of question 
marks, and rouge on the nose. 

The first highlight of our social life was the 
Freshman reception at which we were the guests of 
President and Mrs. Gray at their home. We all re- 
member that pleasant evening, and the fun we had 
getting acquainted with many classmates. Remember 
Prof. Rob's reading? 

We began at an early date to realize the enjoyment 
derived from being members of the Bates Outing 
Club. It was on the evening of October 19 that we 
were first introduced to Thorncrag, a pleasure spot 
for us all. This annual all-college picnic gave us a 
chance to prove that we had our college cheers and 
songs well learned. 

Even before the Thanksgiving recess arrived, 
manv of our classmates began to come to the front. Edith Lerrigo was the 




PAGE EIGHTY-FIVE 




THE 



MIPPOI^ 

IQ32 




first chosen for the women's deliating squad. Clifton Jacobs won the Fresli- 
man tennis crown; twelve women and seven men were accei)ted as Glee Club 
members; such well known names as Brown, White, and Murphy may not 
have meant much to us until they began to be known as those scrappy' Bob- 
kittens of the gridiron. l{ven when freshmen. Whitten and Cole began their 
fiashy career on the turf. 

One of the noteworthy events after 'i'hanksgiving was the election of 
officers to lead us along the path of righteousness; President, Randoljjh 
Weatherbee; \'ice-president. Carohn Woodman; Treasurer, Xathan Buck- 
man ; Secretary, Dorothy Lawless. 

After Christmas, the following headlines came to our eyes : "Brilliant 
Running of Whitten. 17-year old Bates Freshman, takes two-mile race at 
Annual Intercollegiate ]\feet at Lake Placid, New York". Continuing in 
the line of sports we recall that we lost the Soph-Frosh track meet, but this 
disappointment was covered uj) a week later when five Freshmen won the 
hoop league. 

After an interval, in which all were introduced to mid-vear exams, our 
interests on campus had changed from sports to the Freshman prize speak- 
ing contest and dramatics. Lucile Foulger and Randolph Weatherbee were 
the winners of this contest. In dramatics, Parker Mann and Ruth Gregory 
Brown began their career in the ca^t for Shakespearean scenes from "The 
Merchant of Venice". About this time twenty freshmen were elected to the 
"Student" staff. 

The winners of the Morse prize given for proficiency in Greek were (irace 
Page, Lucile Foulger, and \'alery Burati. The Misses Nichols, Brown, and 
Lerrigo composed the winning team of the women's prize debate. Bugbee, 
Mann, and Dill Avon the men's debate. Edith Lerrigo and Orimer lUigbee 
were chosen the best individual speakers. 

As freshmen we made our deljut in the social whirl with a yachting-party- 
dance in Chase. Jnne 1. 

VOLUME n. THE RULE OF THE SOPHOMORES 

September. 1929. brought nearly all of us back to 
campus with deep sun tans and many tabulated "thou 
shalt not's" for the children of 1933 to obey. "What 
a grand and glorious feeling" for us who were sopho- 
mores, but "when a fella needs a friend" sensation for 
those poor freshmen. During this eventful year we 
were under the guidance of Ben White, president ; 
Dot Lawless, vice-president; Margaret Hines, secre- 
tary- ; and Norm Whitten, treasurer. 

At the beginning of this year, we were whirled 
right into sports. The annual freshman and sopho- 
more baseball game was a tie, but the sophs, full of 
rivalry and visions of a free banquet, won the football 
fight. Success came to Bates this year by being 
champs in football, track, and hockey. Without being unduly selfish, much 
praise is due to members of '32 wdio were on these varsity teams. The memo- 
ries of some of these victories, and the Mt. David celebrations will never 
be forgotten. 

The girls of '32 began the social events of the year, being hostesses at an 



^ 


)f 


4f^ 




3^' 






r/ 




R-^ 


— ^(\ 



PAGE EIGHTY-SIX 




nil IQ32 












informal dance on November 15. Of course you have not forgotten the 
"Sophomore Spin", and those dances "We" and "Up in the Clouds". 

During the winter season, several successful 4A productions introduced 
such talented sophomores as Margaret Hines. Marjorie Briggs. Parker Dex- 
ter, and Christine Stone in the well known stage successes "The Importance 
of being Earnest", "Intimate Strangers", and "The Twelfth Xight". 

Carolyn Woodman and Norman Whitten were the winners of the soph- 
omore prize speaking contest held in Little Theater, November 23, 1929.^ In 
the debating field. Randolph Weatherbee, Norman MacDonald, Harrison 
Greenleaf, Edith Lerrigo, and Rivera Ingle became well known. Credit is 
due these classmates for their forensic ability, which later resulted in Bates 
winning the debate title in the Eastern College League. 

The Sophomore Hop, with its eleven-piece dance orchestra and novel 
favors proved to be "the" formal affair of the year. Coming as it did. on 
March 13. it added gaiety to the campus buried in writtens and reports. 

Lest one may think the Sophomore co-eds were nonentities this year 
regarding athletics, it will be only just to mention that they won the base- 
ball game played against the seniors, the archery title for the year, and the 
track meet. During the Carnival, the queen, Rosemary Lambertson, was 
high point winner in winter sports. 

Sophomore skill among the men again came to the 
front when they won the sophomore-freshman track 
meet in April. About this time class rivalry, which 
had been smoldering for some time between the Sophs 
and Frosh, began to erupt. Will any of us forget that 
week of hostilities preceding the Sophomore ban- 
quet? Even Hedge Lab was nearly blown up — but 
to no avail, for all members of this valiant class sat 
around the festive board at the DeWitt Hotel on May 
13. Remember President White, calm after the fray, 
and the witty extemporaneous remarks of Rand at 
what proved to be "The Last Supper"? 

VOLUME in. THE JUNIORS 

Our class officers this year were Randolph Weatherbee, president ; Frances 
Cronin, vice-president; Dana Williams, treasurer; Alice Hellier. secretary; 
all capable and ready to direct our activities for the year. 

The social calendar was already full. October marks the month when 
Rand first began to get his practice in speaking before the microphone. This 
was in the debate against a team from the University of Scotland. 

October 20 goes down in history as the day when we all met Paul Clau- 
del, ambassador from France. Bates held its one and only special convoca- 
tion for this distinguished gentleman. 

Debating took up most of the time in the fall, Shirley Cave. Orimer Bug- 
bee, and Lawrence Parker being prominent. 

The first of our classmates to take the next fatal step along the path of 
matrimony was Marjorie Briggs, who, on October 2. announced her engage- 
ment at a charming bridge held at Chase House. 

The class made the junior Cabaret, which was held on November 22. go 
down in the historv of social events in this college as one of the most color- 




PAGE EIGHTY-SEVEN 




!Q32 




ful and successful. Chase Hall resembled a Spanish night club, and bore 
the name "La Hacienda". 

It was during this \ear that so many meritorious issues of the Garnet 
were ])ublishfd. \ alery Burati as editt^r deserves commendation for these. 

A history of the class would not be complete with- 
out mentioning December 5. the day Mr. Alarm Clock 
s])oke in Chapel. Xo one will take the praise for 
bringing' such a noisy ])erson to our chapel platform, 
Init possibly reward is due to some '32-er. 

A\'e find the juniors winning more laurel wreaths 
this winter in sports events. Both the men's and 
women's teams won the class basketball honors. 

Politics had their fling in March and as a result 
many prominent and capable Juniors were elected to 
take over responsibilities of all publications. clul)s, 
societies, student government, and sports for the en- 
suing year. 

Several class meetings were called during this time to discuss the subject 
of "blazers", and also to attend to the more important matters of class officers 
and editors of the Mirror. Randf)lph Weatherbee was elected to be our 
prexy for a third term. The rest of his cabinet consisted of Julia Briggs, 
vice-president; Alice Hellier. secretary; Parker Mann, treasurer. Elden 
Dustin was chosen editor of the "Mirror", assisted by Robert Manson as 
business manager. 

Our lives as Juniors drew to an end with ]v\- Day, when we learned to 
wear caps and gowns properly, and finally with the Ivy Hop. This modern- 
istic affair further proved the decorative skill and originality of our class- 
mates. 




VOLUME IV. THE SENIORS 

We are able to recognize a few changes on campus 
even if we are not prepared to live up to a dignified 
and noble status. We learn that a few of our class- 
mates have not returned; we see a promising class of 
freshmen already at home here ; we read that Profes- 
sor Wilkins has taken his "love and obey" vows ; we 
are glad to know that there is a new dormitory avail- 
able for the girls. 

One of the momentous occasions for the girls of 
the college came on September 28. when they were in- 
formed that they were allowed to study in the library 
three nights a week. This liberal arts college is now 
showing" its liberality. 

The senior women commenced the social season 
on October 4 by entertaining their freshmen sisters at tea. On October 23, 
their ability as actresses was displayed in their stunt performed at the Back- 
to-Bates Night reunion. The evening of Friday, November 13th, was a lucky 
one for the men who were the guests of the senior girls at their dance — the 
"Senior Scandals". 




PAGE EIGHTY-EIGHT 




Mimloi^ 

'- ' 1932 




This year the successful Y. \V. C. A. bazaar, the Money Making Blues 
managed by Christine Stone, proved worthy of its name. The Blue Moon 
Tea Room became quite the popular rendezvous. 

One of the most entertaining and pleasant affairs on the senior's social 
calendar was the reception at the home of President and Mrs. Gray on the 
evening of January 12. The vocal trio consisting of Marjorie Briggs, Marion 
Blake, and Muriel dower was enjoyed very much. The Hill-Billy act, put 
on by the quiet monks from Roger Bill proved to be a riotous skit. During 
the evening. X'iolet Blanchard was the recipient of many best wishes, having 
announced her engagement that afternoon at a tea given in Hacker House. 

The first of a series of worthwhile Student Assemblies was on October 1. 
On this occasion the student body was taught a new Bates song to add to 
its rejjertoire, "The Bates Smoker". This number served as a theme song 
for the program of music broadcasted from W'CSH in Portland on Decem- 
ber 4. Randolph W'eatherbee was the announcer of the program sponsored 
by the "Student". 

There are several other events that mark a place in our lives as seniors, 
although they are really campus activities. The innovation of club consoli- 
dation promoted by X'alery Burati was one of the principal movements on 
the cam])us during the winter. The news that Sunday skating was to be 
approved by the faculty occasioned considerable surprise. Many seniors as 
delegates were prominent in discussions at the Model Disarmament Confer- 
ence held in Chase Hall. January 21. One of the most important functions 
on the college calendar this year was the new'ly inaugurated All-College 
Election Day, March 21. Results showed that 84% of the student body went 
to the polls; the Seniors ended the list with a 72^'( . The statistics show that 
Senior women were more conscientious in voting than the men. 86% having' 
voted. 

One of the college functions that revealed the 
prominence of seniors w'as the Winter Carnival. 
The mystery about the Carnival Queen which had 
pervaded our campus during this season, was cleared 
away on the evening- of February 6. As the fanfare 
of trumpets sounded their majestic blasts, Julia 
Briggs, one of the most popular girls of our class, 
walked the royal carpet in the Alumni gym as the 
Queen of the Carnival. 

William Dunham won the Maine Intercollegiate 
Oratorical contest on w^orld peace on February 15. 
His oration entitled "Idealistic Materialism" was pub- 
lished in the Garnet, edited by V'alery Burati. 

The class of '32 started a precedent by putting on 
a mid-year formal. It was carried out in true George Washington style on 
February 20. This event was enjoyable and successful due to a committee 
who are now veterans at planning dances. 

Dan Cupid sped his arrow on February 22 when the marriage of "Red" 
Long and Idabelle Worcester took place at the President's home with Presi- 
dent Gray performing the ceremony. 

The work of seniors in 4A during this year can be reviewed by saying 
that Margaret Hines, president of 4A, who coached and played the lead in 
the one-act play, "The Wedding", coached the \'arsity play, "Grumpy", pro- 




PAGE EIGHTY-NINE 




THE 



5 t II IQ32 :^ 




diiced December Q and 10. ]\Iarjorie Briggs, the star of emotional roles, 
was sister Sue in "Where the Cross is Made", a horried over-dressed little 
l)east in "Grumpy", and the emotional. tem])estuous. and docile Kate in "Tam- 
ing of the Shrew". 

A brief note is necessary to remind our classmates that with the close of 
the football season at the Colby game, won by Valicenti's extra ]>oint. four- 
teen Seniors ended their career as representatives of the Bates colors. One 
other noteworthy event is that the senior men's basketball team ended their 
honoral)le career with a clean record during four years of playing. 

The scholastic ability of our class may be summed up by reviewing the 
announcements of "Honors Day". The parity of ability of the men and 
women is shown up in the fact that twenty-two men and the same number of 
women received an average of 85 9f or more the first semester. The Phi 
Beta Kappa elections show a slight unevenness. five women and six men 
being elected. The following men elected to the College Club are all prom- 
inent and efficient: Clinton Dill, William Dunham, Elden Dustin, Norman 
MacDonald, Randolph Weatherbee, Norman Whitten, and Ray McCluskey. 
Those elected to Delta Sigma Rho are all talented debaters, and as a result 
of their ability, Bates \von the Eastern League championship again this year. 
The members are John Carroll. Shirley Cave. William Dunham. Harrison 
Greenleaf. Edith Lerrigo. Xorman MacDonald. Lawrence Parker, and Ran- 
dolph Weatherbee. 

Now that honors are announced and the adminis- 
trations for the coming year are in competent hands, 
seniors feel that their career as students of Bates are 
over. It is with pride that we look over the new and 
good things inaugurated in Bates since we were fresh- 
men. May we be pardoned if we give a little credit 
to ourselves for these improvements? 

Because we have had a pleasant and productive 
sojourn at Bates, we are sorry to become alumni. 
We are envious of those freshmen who are to receive 
our colors next year. 

We hope that we have not just "played a part" 
but that the impressions we have made on Bates, and 
Bates on us, will l)e enduring. 




PAGE NINETY 




PAGE NINETY-ONE 




Mimloi^ 

* : : 19 32 



JQaa 




CLASS OF 1933 



OFFICERS 

President, Arnold Goldthwaitf, Adams 

Vice-president, LuciLE Curtis Jack 

Secretary, Dorothy Eulalia O'Hara 

Treasurer. VixcEXT Johx Kirby 

The Class of '33 will carry out with distinction all the responsibilities which 
the noblesse oblige of seniors will place on its shoulders. One is sure of this, for 
past records of success in all college activities are convincing. 



PAGE NINETY-TWO 




THE 



■ ■ ■ i 19 32 •— '-' 




CLASS ROLL, 1933 



Adams, Arnold Goldtlnvaite 
Antine, Bertram James 
Arlington, Marjorie Ruth 
Ashe, Helen Kathryn 
Augustinus, Dagmar Elizabeth 
Austin, George Russell 
Barnett, Josephine Fanny 
Barry, Leo James 
Bean, Elwood Eugene 
Belleau, Vincent 
Benham, Ruth Trowbridge 
Berkover, Franklin Shaw 
Berry, Herbert Odde 
Bond, Luis Donald 
Boothby, Jlarjorie Adelaide 
Bowdoin, Janet Mabel 
Brackett, Frances Lucretia 
Burch, Reynold Edward 
Byron, Frank Hackett 
Carpenter, Paul Nathaniel 
Carrier, Mildred Mary 
Carter, Rebecca Williamson 
Chandler, Alice Louise 
Clemens, James Richard 
Conant, Constance Roper 
Crafts, Roger Conant 
Cronkhite, Roland Frederick 
Curtis, John Alden 
Curtiss, Mavis Clare 
Cutts, Charlotte 
Dean, George Royce 
Derby, Roger Langer 
Diggery, Dorothy Helen 
Dobravolsky, John Joseph 
Donald, James Frederick 
Dumais, Beatrice Patricia 
Eggleton, Robert James, Jr. 
Farrell, Sydney Warren 
Flynn, Francis Daniel, Jr. 
Franklin, Benjamin Russell 
Frew, Pauline Margaret 
Furtwengler, Willis Joseph 
Gerke, Walter Ludwig 
Gilman, Phyllis Louise 
Goodbout, Marjorie Louisa 
Gorham, Amos Richmond 
Goulston, Harold I-'rancis 
Greenlaw, Hollis Sheldon 



Hall, Clayton Howard 
Hamlin, Helen Etta 
Harmon. Ruth Cushman 
Harris. Martha Phoenix 
Hayden, Paul 
Hayes, Marion Ethel 
Hinds, Norma Frances 
Hollywood, Mildred Ruth 
Holman, Lyman 
Ho>:ie, Thomas Barr 
Hurder, Richard Elton 
Hutchins, Charles Parker 
Irish, Amy Alma 
Italia, Frank 
Jack, Lucile Curtis 
Jackson, Stanley Bartlett 
James, Florence Edith 
Jensen, Herbert William 
Johnson, Margaret EHzabeth 
Johnson, Robert Allston 
Karkos, Harold Michael 
Kelly, Joseph Arnold 
Kemp, Harry Emerson 
King, Walter Landis 
Kittredge, Thelma Lucille 
Knowles, Clive Dorman 
Kroepsch, Robert Hayden 
Larry, John Stanton 
LaVallee, Henry Lucien 
Lemieux, Lionel Albert 
Lewis, Virginia 
Libbey, Eleanor Violet 
Lindsey, Walter Kenneth 
Littlefield, Pearl Allen 
Lord, Elizabeth Ellen 
McAlister, Eugene Barrows 
McCarthy, Olin John 
McCluskey, Ralph Herschel 
McCue, Allen Lord 
McGrath, Elizabeth Dain 
McLeod, Stanley Elmer 
Melcher, Rosamond Stanwood 
Merrill, Walter Cushman 
Merry, Florence Whitman 
Morong, Marguerite 
Moulton, Virginia Margaret 
Moyer, Mildred Greaves 
Nichols, Kenneth Edward 



Neilsen, Beatrice Wilhelmina 
O'Brien, Helen Frances 
Ogden, Florence Caroline 
O'Hara, Dorothy Eulalia 
O'Neil, Mary Louise 
Orcutt, Dawn Ehzabeth 
Osano, Eda Catherine 
Osborn, Clinton Morris 
Parker, Helen Elizabeth 
Pattison, Bruce Eraser 
Pennell, Edith Monroe 
Penny, Dorothy 
Plotica, George 
Pottle, Walter Clarence, Jr. 
Prescott, Edwin Haines 
Provost, Pierre Eusebe 
Purington, Alice Julia 
Ranlett, Margaret 
Richter, Charles Oscar 
Roche, John Thomas 
Rolfe, Evelyn 
Scolnik, Samuel 
Shapiro, Harold 
Shapiro, Marcella Beatrice 
Simard, Gerald Lionel 
Smith, Donald McEwen 
Smith, Verne Flanders 
Sonstroem, Eva Elizabeth 
Stafford, Donald Barton 
Staples, Dorothy May 
Stevens, Gerald Elwin 
Stevens, John Howe, Jr. 
Stuart, Barbara Lucille 
Swasey, Mary Adelaide 
Swett, Robert Beuerle 
Thompson, Celia Augusta 
Thompson, Deborah 
Thompson, Donald Mandeville 
Titifney, Wesley Newell 
Tuthill, Richard Lovejoy 
vonMueller, Ingeborg 
Walker, Albert Marston 
Ward, Milton Joseph 
Wills, Dorothy Evelyn 
Wimmer, Frank Ernest 
Wood, Franklin Neal 
Wood, Kenneth Irving 



PAGE NINETY-THREE 




THE 
= ' 1932 ' 





IVY DAY, Class of 1933 



I'raxer 

Address In' President 

Oration 

Prophecy 

Gifts to Men 

Gifts to Women 



'I'o the Faculty 
To the Co-eds 
To the IMen 
To the Athletes 
To the Seniors 
Toastmaster 



TOASTS 



DoxALD Bond 

Arnold Adams 

Henry LaValleE 

Rebecca Carter 

Dorothy O'Hara 

ToHx Dobravolsky 



George Austin 

Richard Tuthill 

Charlotte Cutts 

Frederick Donald 

Rosamond Melcher 

John Curtis 



Marshal, Roger Crafts 
Cliainiuiii. Henry LaVallee 



PAGE NINETY-FOUR 




THE 



Mlt^l^OI^ 



jUiiiiriiii Hill iiiiiini 111 



Q32 




Awards Won by the Class of 1933 



General Scholarship — Freshman Year 

Ruth T. Benham 
Charlotte Cutts 
Stanley B. Tackson 



Sophomore Year 

Ruth T. Benham 
Stanley B. Jackson 

Excellence in Public Speaking — 

Freshman Yi 

FJizaheth Corey Savage 
Henry L. LaVallee 

Sophomore Year 

Dorothy E. Wills 
John A. Curtis 

Honors in Debate — Freshman Year 
Winning Team, First Division 

Rebecca W. Carter 
Harold Shapiro 
Dagmar E. Augustinus 



Second Division 
Charles T. Hutchins 
Frank E. Wiinmer 
Gerald E. Stevens 

Best Individual Speaker 

Tie between Rebecca W, Carter and 
Harold Shapiro. Lionel A. Lemieux 

Sophomore Year 

Winning Teams, Men 
Lionel A. Lemieux 
Frank E. Wimmer 
Gerald E. Stevens 

Women 

Helen E. Hamlin 
Lucile C. Jack 

Best Individual Speakers 
Helen E. Hamlin 
Lionel A. Lemieux 

Excellence in Greek 

Mary G. Wright 
Francis D. Flvnn 



ASSISTANTSHIPS 



Biology 

Roger C. Crafts 

Chemistry 

Gerald E. Simard 

Economics 

Samuel Scolnik 



Geology 

Herbert O. Berry 
Edward J. Wilmot 

Mathematics 

Stanley B. Jackson 

Physical Education for Men 
Henry C. LaVallee 



PAGE NINETY-FIVS 




THE 

' ^' i 19 32 •'^.^'' 



'MMMflMsKw^' 





HACKER HOUSE 



A much needed addition to the Bates campus is Hacker House, situated 
at 29 Frye Street. This new women's dormitory is the gift of the late Frank 
M. Hacker who left his property to the college under the condition that its 
administrators should make a settlement with the heirs of the estate, whereby 
the college would come into possession of the property at the expiration of 
the life interest of his residuary legatee. 

It is a square, newly painted brown building, three stories in height. A 
paved walk, surrounded by well-trimmed lawns, leads up to the small ver- 
anda at the front of the house. The rooms within are attractively and com- 
fortably furnished. 

Hacker house ])rovides rooms for seventeen freshman girls and twu senior 
proctors. It has been a welcome help in solving the housing problem at 
Bates. 



PAGE NINETY-SIX 




PAGE NINETY-SEVEN 



■*-Ti*«&*'' 




THE 

M. M I RhcOtc ^* 

i M . 1932 



^*);>:«. "^l«t 'iii«. 





CLASS OF 1934 



OFFICERS 

President. James Wilfred Balano 

I'icc-prcsidciit. Mary Ruth Gardner 

Secretary. Verna Louise BrackETT 

Treasurer, H. Robinson Johnston 

The Class of '34 can now look liackward to see a successful year already passed. 
Most freshman hopes and anil)itions are realized in the line athletes, debaters, 
scholars, musicians, and actors of this good class. Individually and collectively 
the Soi)homores of this year have made a permanent place in liates life. 



PAGE NINETY-EIGHT 




THE 

^ i I I 1Q32 



''^B 



If iiiflliiMi 



CLASS ROLL, 1934 



Alibott, Patricia 
Adams, Gray Wilder 
Albertini, John Clement 
Amrein, Arthur Stanley 
A]>plchy. Alva Sterling 
Archibald, Arthur ClitTonl 
Arik, Isidore 
Ashton, Eugene Samuel 
Balano, James Wilfred 
Barton, Dorothy Curtis 
Bates, Howard Walter 
Bean, Madeline Lois 
Beaumont, Lester William 
Bennett, Marjorie Enola 
Bishop, George Turner 
Blanchard, Ernest Richards 
Blanchard, Lucienne 
Bowman, Ruth Augusta 
Brackett, Verna Louise 
Brown, Gait McGregor 
Buck, Theresa Robinson 
Bumpus, Cora Blanche Evelyn 
Butler, Robert Morrill 
Campbell. Kenneth Stoddard 
Carter, Ruth Marion 
Carter, Sylvester Jefferson 
Carver, Celeste Josephine 
Catone, Vincent Peter 
Chick, Martha Ellen 
Clifford, Philip Alvah 
Coleman, Arba John 
Conley, Marceleine Barbara 
Cook, Harriet Amelia 
Cooper, John Edward, Jr. 
Crawford, Evelyn Pearl 
Crockett, Nancy Longfellow 
David, John Archer, Jr. 
Davis, Everett Merton 
Decatur, Edwin Forrest 
DeMarco, Norman 
D'Errico, Angela 
Dillon, John Henry 
Drew, Bernard Thomas 
Dunfield, Berton Wheeler 
Eaton, John Buxton 
Edwards, Arline 
Facey, Walter Leonard 
Farnham, Evelyn Gladys 
Fireman, Irving Edward 
Fitterman, Robert 
Fitz, Donald Willis 
Flint, Warren Fiske 
Fogelman. Max Harry 
Frew, Arthur David 
Frost, Lawrence Everett 
Fuller, Mary Constance 
Gardiner, Alden Pierce 
Gardner, Mary Ruth 
Geddes, Verna Muriel 
Genthner. Richard Wight 



George, Lloyd Favor 
Gilman, Samuel Charles 
Goodwin, Helen Myrna 
Gordon, Dwiglit Francis 
Gormley, Thomas Joseph, Jr. 
Gross, Lester Hall 
Grover, Olive Willis 
Hager, Russell Perry 
Hal!, John Curtis 
Hall, Richard Chesbro 
Ham, Donald 
Hanley, John Bernard 
Hill, Josephine Leavitt 
Hobbs, Elizabeth Ruth 
Holbrook, Clyde Amos 
Holden, Clifford Gardner 
Hopkinson, Maxine 
Hutchinson, Edward Bixby 
Jellison, Russell Edward 
Johnson, Ruth 
Johnston, Hagel Robinson 
Kaiiszewski, Carl Joseph 
Kirby, Vincent John 
Krause, Robert Louis 
Larrabee, Florence Eleanor 
Latham, Arthur Jeremiah, Jr. 
Leavitt, Cleopatra Higgins 
Lelyveld, Edward Isaac 
Lepage, Georgette Vitaline 
Lombardy, Julius Samniis 
Longfellow, Virginia 
Loonier, Bernard McDonald 
Lord, Barbara Claire 
McAlister, Doris Ware 
McCormack, Mary Maxine 
Mallinson, Annis Louise 
May, Wendell Bell 
Meagher, Louis 
Merrifield, Arthur Woodrow 
Milbury, Nathan Alfred 
Miller, Lester 
Millet, Harold Frank 
Millet, Howard Sawin 
Milnes, Russell Henry 
Mitchell, Henry Cashen 
Moody, Charlotte Evangeline 
Moynihan, Jere Graffam 
Murphy, Joseph Francis, Jr. 
Murray, Frank Suther 
Musgrave, Thomas William 
Neilson, Doris Rice 
Nichols, Leonard Frank 
Nyquist, Arthur Stanley 
O'Connell, John James 
Oliver, Albert Irving, Jr. 
O'Neill, Francis Gregory 
Paige. Millicent Edna 
Petke, Frederick Edward 
Phillips, William Henry 
Povey, Charles Gilbert 



Priest, Norman Hall 
Proctor, Theodate Ward 
Rand, William James, Jr. 
Raymond, Sumner Low 
Keeks. Reginald Walter 
Keid, Majorie Estelle 
Rice, Helen May 
Richards, Sumner Earle 
Riley, Mowbrey Oswald 
Robbins, Stanley William 
Roberts, Fred Henry 
Rounds, Ruth Evelyn 
Ruegg, Arnold, Jr. 
Rfggi John Church 
Rutledge, Robert Eaton 
Salsbury, Beatrice Lee 
Seamon, Theodore Israel 
Semetauskis, Steven Joseph 
Sewall, Willis Dana 
Shiffer, Maurice 
Shoemaker, Sylvia Grace 
Shorey, Helen Folsom 
Skillins. Alice Arlene 
Small, Edward Pierce, Jr. 
Smith, Donald Roswell 
Smith, Harold Edmund 
Soba, Frances Bartholomew 
Soper, Eileen 
Spear, Gladys Gwendolyn 
Sprince, Herbert 
Stebbins, Margaret 
Stetson, Richard Shaw 
Stevens, Gertrude Oletta 
Stevens, Martin Lewis 
Sweeney, Dorothy May 
Thorp, Almus Morse 
Thurston, Frederick Clark 
Toomey, Charles Francis 
Trafton, Howard Munro 
Turner, George Aaron 
Turner, Horace Edgar 
Tuttle, Richard Allison 
Valentine, William Robert, Jr. 
Varney, Norman Ellsworth 
Wade, William Ernest, Jr. 
Wallace, William Vincent 
Wells, Florence Nanny 
Welsch, Malvin Sawyer 
Wheeler, Miriam Hayes 
Whipple, Charles Everett, 2nd 
White, Harold Leroy 
Wikingstad, Walter Knut 
Williams, Elinor 
Wilmot, Edward Joseph 
Wilson, Elizabeth Mary 
Wilson, Jeannette Elizabeth 
Worthlcy, Beulah 
York, Mary Elizabeth 
Young, Eva Helen 
Zahn, Crescenti.i 



PAGE NINETY-NINE 



■ ' : 1932 








GARNET KEY 



President. James Balano, '34 



OFFICERS 



Secretary-Treasurer, Bernard Loomer, '34 



James Balano, '34 
John Cooper, '34 
Bernard Drew, '34 



MEMBERS 

Alden Gardiner, '34 
Clyde Holbrook, '34 
Bernard Loomer, '34 



Jere Moynihan, '34 
Norman E. Varney, '34 
Walter Wikingstad, '34 



The Garnet Key is composed of eleven sophomore men including the class 
president. The duty of the group is to supervise, under the direction of the 
Student Council, the orientation of the freshman men in college life. Initiation is 
the major interest of the Key. This year, as usual, it made its first formal appear- 
ance Poster Xight when the freshmen were ceremoniously presented with their 
up-until-Thanksgiving credo. 

The 1934 Key, certainly in a transition period in the initiation situation at 
Bates, adopted a more moderate policv toward the cruder aspects of initiation, and 
found itself criticized and l)ro\vI)eaten by certain campus groups, upheld I)y others, 
and considered useless by other factions. The Garnet Key deserves credit for 
doing a hard task in the face of conflicting forces. The criticism belongs to the 
principle, not to the personalities in the 1934 Garnet Key. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED ONE 




THE 





CLASS OF 1935 



OFFICERS 

President, Gordon Jones 

Vice-president, Frances Hayden 

Secretary, Marjorie Avery 

Treasurer, Robert Kramer 

Pendants on green ribbon and I)lack and garnet caps did not conceal tbe capabili- 
ties of the youngest group of the student body. Already we have good candidates 
for every field of campus activity including athletics, dramatics and debating, and 
in addition the class has a high average in scholastic interests. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWO 




li ■. , 19 32 •' * '-' 




CLASS ROLL, 1935 



Additon. Tlnirlie Etta 
Agard, Evelyn 
Aliern, John Steplien 
j\jemian, Martin 
Aldrich. Edward Preble 
Anicetti. Robert John 
Anthol, Evelyn Marjorie 
Arnold, Mortftn Xewell 
Avery, Majorie Belle 
Backus, Albert Hawes 
Bangs, Robert Allan 
Bates, Dorothy Antoinette 
Bates, Kenneth Louis 
Bauer, Raymond Henry 
Bean, Lillian Maria 
Bedard, Romeo Leo 
Bedell, Lynda Edgar 
Boston, Chester Ernest 
Bragg, \'olney Casper 
Briggs, Mira Katherine 
Brooks, Ruie Jane 
Bilker, Wayne Aflams 
Butterfield, Mary Elizabeth 
Call, Frederick Duncan 
Candee, Charles Frederic 
Cantlin, Regina Adelaide 
Carlin, Abraham 
Cashman, Elizabeth Laura 
Chandler, Tracy Clough 
Chaplin, Ivy Ernestine 
Chapman, Percy Alton 
Chilman. Charles William 
Chute, Winfreil Sidney 
Clements, Stella Emma 
Coggeshall, Marjorie 
Coleman, Dorrance Thurle 
Condon, Catherine Gorman 
Coombs, Robert Lincoln 
Crockwell, George Warren 
Cubberly, Carle Purdy 
Curtis, Maxine Ethel 
Darling, Richard Martin 
Dean, Helen Louise 
De Meyer. Edgar Sanborn 
Diggery, Miriam Maude 
Dimlich, Benjamin Franklin 
Dionne, Raymond Armand 
Dixey, Grant Milton 
Dolan, Edward Lewis 
Dority, John Xelson 
Dow, Joy Wheeler, Jr. 
Drake, Carl Lysantler 
Driscoll, George Olney 
Duarte, Antone 
Duifett, Arthur Haslam 
Durell, Elizabeth 
Dvorin, Herman 
Eckhardt, Frances Anne 
Edwards, John Glenerven, Jr. 
Eggleston, Paul Sumner 
Eves, James Henderson 
Fellows, William Francis 
Fifield, Russell Hunt 
Fosdick, Elizabeth 
Foss, Harold Leroy 
Foster, Elizabeth Joyce 
Frangedakis, Pandaleon E- 
Frost, Robert Avery 
Frye, Ruth 

Fuller, Samuel Theodore 
Gallinari, Rosie Mary 
Gay, Walter ALayo 
Gearing, Grace Gardner 
Gellerson, Hilda Erdine 
Gervais, Elsie Marion 
Gervais, Florence White 
Gilman, Arthur 
Goodwin, Eleanor Henrietta 
Goss, Paul Adrian 



Goss. William Edward 
Green, Leonard Bernard 
Greig, Xorman Inglis 
Griffin, Lewis John 
Gross, John William 
Ham, Gertrufle Frances 
Hamilton, Anastasia Caroline 
Hammond, Reginald Arden 
Harmon, Charlotte 
Harmon, Frances Estelle 
Harris, Stanley Gershon 
Harwood, Raymond 
Haver. William Emery 
Hayden, Frances Lambert 
Hebert, Clarence Louis Pierce 
Heldman, Carl Louis, Jr. 
Hennessey, Parker Francis 
Hickey, Daniel Buckley 
Higgins, Willard Rav 
Hill, Dwight Bradford, Jr. 
Hobbs, Glenna Manola 
Hopkins, Chester Thomas 
Houle, Roland Charles 
Howard, Rose Anna 
Ho.xie, Margaret 
Hughes, Sarah Elizabeth 
Hutchins. Francis Eugene 
Ingraham, John Xorris 
Jackson, Wallace Renton 
.Tenks, Arnold Hastings 
Jones, Kenneth Gordon 
Kendrick, Paul Adams 
Khouri, John George 
Kimball, Dorothy Jordan 
Kimball, Everett Eugene 
King, Thelma F-rencli 
Knapp, Miriam Peirce 
Kramer, Robert Joseph 
Lafayette, Xorman Wilfred 
Lamb, Robert Bleakie 
Lawrence, Robert Carleton 
Leadbetter, Barbara Louise 
Lenzi, Leno Francis 
Light, Minnie Lucy 
Lincoln, Barbara 
Lindholm. Milton Lambert 
Linehan, Doris Jane 
Littlefield, Barbara Sturgis 
Longley, Charlotte Elizabeth 
Lord, Wyman Holden 
Loring, ^lary Lester 
Lynch, Russell Joseph 
McAllister, Richard Eliot 
McCarthy, Mildred Agnes 
McHroy, Madeline Crawford 
McKenney, Charlotte Elizabeth 
McLean, Powers 
McXally, Rose Virginia 
Malloy, Donald Wilson 
Mann, Wilma Evelyn 
Marcous, John Paul 
Marquis, John Henry Wilson 
M artel, Charles Louis 
Mastalli, Attilio Charles 
May, Alice 

Mendall, George Vickery 
Merriam, Ronald Hubert 
Milliken, Carl Elias. Jr. 
Murray, Jean Harriet 
Musgrave, Ralph Burnett 
Xorman, Howard Francis 
X'orton, Walter Josiah 
Nunnally, Thoinas Everett 
O'Connor, Harry Fenton, Jr. 
Olds, George Albert 
Oliver, Ethel Crockett 
Oliver, James Wilson 
Orestis, George 
Paige, Charles Warren 



Palmer, Offin Beman 
Parent. Doris Beatrice 
Parker, Glidden McLellan 
Paul, Edward Joseph 
Pendleton, Frank Irving 
Pennell, Edgar Llewellyn, Jr. 
Perkins, JLargaret Estella 
Perry, Bond Mendum 
Perry, John Allen 
Philpot, Ella Boody 
Pierce, John Hewett 
Poland, Virabelle Lillian 
Pond. Harolil Prescott, Jr. 
Poulin, Thelma Theresa 
Pricher, William Stadon 
Pride, Ruth Elaine 
Purinton, Royce Davis 
Kainville, Xorman Gabriel 
Randolph, Dorothy Xadin 
Rautio, Walter Kauko 
Ray. Frances Elise 
Raymond, Irma Millicent 
Redlon, Arietta Gertrude 
Rich. Evelyn .Mabel 
Robbins, Sylvanus Fred 
Rohin, Irving Ben 
Ross, Sayward DeBerna 
Rounseville, Ellsworth .Mien 
Rowe, Mary Ellen 
Salloway, Bernard Shaw' 
Samarco, Frank 
Savage, Corinne Estelle 
Sav\yer, June 
Scolnik, William 
Scolnik, William Hyman 
Secor, Richard Wallace 
Senecal, Gordon Roy 
Shattuck, Rosamond Myrtle 
Sheridan. Bernard James 
Small, Chester Calvert 
Smith, Abbott Pliny, 2nd 
Smith, Bryce Adams 
Smith, Josiah Lunt 
Snyder, Harold Richard 
Springer. Josephine M\ra 
Stahl, John Willis 
Stetson, Ray Willard 
Stevens, Florence Dorothy 
Stone, William Howard 
Suitor, Helen Frances 
Sutclifife, William Denhain 
Tabbut, Milton Frank 
Taylor, Dayton ^'ance 
Taylor, Dorland Xetf 
Thomas. Gertrude Amy- 
Thornton. William Martin 
Thorpe. Margaret Durrell 
Tiernev. Edward Joseph 
Trites.' Ruth Eliza"beth 
Tsourides, Peter Hercules 
\'alicenti, Virgil 
\'an Syckle, John Fred, Jr. 
Vernon, Thomas Sidney 
Walker. Robert Grossman 
Walters. Xelson Thompson 
Ware, Reginald Stowell, Jr. 
Webb, Frances Louise 
Webber, Gladys Lavinia 
Wells, Bertha Littlefield 
White, Kenneth Burrall 
White, Robert Franklin, Jr. 
Wilder, Beulah Marion 
Williams, Louise Amelia 
Winston. Edward Capron 
Worcester. Ralph Waldo 
Wright, Robert Curtis 
Yeaton. Oliver Eugene 
Yerkes, Doris Elizabeth 
Zook, William Gerad 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THREE 




miSroi^ 





FRYE STREET HOUSE 




CHASE HOUSE 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FOUR 




STUDENT 
GOVERNMENT 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIVS 




Mimloi^ 

■■■■■: 19 32 '" i-' 





STUDENT COUNCIL 

OFFICERS 

President, Randolph Weathkrbek, '32 

Vice-president, Ray McCluskey, '32 

Secretar\-Treasurcr. Robert Swett, 'ii 



MEMBERS 

Arnold Adams, 'ii 
Henry LaVallee, 'ii 
Robert Swett, '33 



James Balano, '34 
John Cooper, '34 
Edward Tierney, '35 



Clinton Dill, 'n 
Ralph Long, '32 
Ray McCluskey, '32 
Randolph Weatherbee, '32 

The purpose of the Student Council is to improve, in general, the conditions of 
student life and to encourage and uphold a policy of cooperative administration 
between the faculty and the student body. 

This year, among other things, the Student Council has aided in crystallizing 
student oi)inion regarding the present system of elections and has completed definite 
plans wherebv all elections under college jurisdiction will be carried out in a 
manner both fair and systematic. 

The Student Council has had a successful year and it is h()i)ed that this organi- 
zation will continue to function as it has in the i)ast and recognize the many oppor- 
tunities for growth and development. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIX 




THE 

■ 19 32 





STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

OFFICERS 

President, Kate R. Hall. '^2 

I "ice-presideut. Barbara Stuart, '2Z 

Secrctarx-Treasurer. Rebecca W. Carter, '33 



MEMBERS OF THE JUDICIARY BOARD 



Marjorie Briggs, '32 
Gertrude Diggery, '32 
Margaret Hines, '32 
Elizabeth Seigel, '32 



Aubigne Gushing. '32 
Lucile Foulger, '32 
Grace Page, '32 
Christine Stone, '32 



Lucile Jack. '33 
Angela D'Errico, '34 
Mary Gardner, '34 



This purpose of the women's governing hoard is to place within the reach of 
each girl the greatest possihilities of College life, to develop within her a sense of 
individual responsihihty through the honor system, and to promote cooperation 
hetween the students and the faculty. 

This year the Student Government tried to maintain the highest of ideals for 
its organization and has endeavored to make itself a real help to the college girls. 

At their annual all-girls hanquet, held December 2, the Board presented as 
feature speaker of the evening the poet. Xancy Byrd Turner. It sponsored a 
Hallowe'en costume i)arty in the Rand Gym which afforded an evening of gaiety 
for all the girls. The Student Government cooperated with the W. A. A. and the 
Y. W. in giving mid-year teas, and it has under consideration plans for making 
the reception rooms more attractive, and for providing facilities for the playing of 
games and for dancing in the evening. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVEN 




Mimloi^ 

' ^ ' i 19 32 




UiJSitilLMlM, 



CHASE HALL 




TO STUDY OR 




TO PLAY? 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHT 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINE 



B^^^^^^^^aigHpP--^ THE 



932 





Y. M. C. A. CABINET 



OFFICERS 



President 
Vice-president 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Faculty . Idzisor 



Howard Paige. '32 

Clive Knowles, '33 

Bernard Loomer, 

Prof. Carl Woodcock 

Dr. Rayborn Zerby 



'34 



COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 

Campus Scrz'ice Robert LaBoyteaux. '32 

Admiuistratioii Robert Manson, '32; Harry Kemp, '33 

Social Serz'ice Rushton Long, '32 

Deputations (Church Cooperation) Donald Bond, '33 

Discussion Groups Robinson Johnston, '34 

Religious Meetings John Curtis, '33 

Publicity Frank O'Neil, '34 

Chase Hall Robert Swett, '33 

Administration Representatiz'e Dr. Rayborn Zerby 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TEN 




"TTI—I p 

. 1932 ■"■- »-' 




Y. M. C. A. 

The new caljinet started work with a week-end retreat to Canton, spent in 
planning the year's work. Before college reopened in the fall the Freshmen had 
already received their handhooks and accompanying letter. 

Representatives of the organizaticm were on campus during the entrance exami- 
nations to help the prospective students. As soon as Freshman Week started, the 
Y was husy meeting trains, looking after trunks, and finding rooms for off-campus 
freshmen. The annual "I Am, ^'ou Are" started the social functions of the 
collegiate year. This year it was held in the Gym and thus avoided the crowding 
and confusion of the past years. The hook agency opened with plenty of old 
hooks for those who wanted them. The Stanton Ride, postponed once, gave the 
freshmen a chance to meet each other informally. Mr. Whitbeck's employment 
department began at once to fight the student financial depression. 

Fireside discussion groups saw the revival of the old study groups. This year 
they were held in the houses of several faculty members. Topics of varied interest 
were discussed in co-ed and segregated groups. Two series were sponsored — one 
in the fall and one at the beginning of the second semester. 

The conferences participated in were the New England Field Council, the 
Maine Y' Council, Disarmament Conference at Colby, the New England Faculty- 
Student Conference at Northfield, and, as usual, the annual Northfield Conference. 

This year the Y gave a new radio to the infirmary and also several new maga- 
zine subscriptions. Occasionally joint meetings were held with the Y^. W. at which 
•outside speakers were featured. These included Paul Porter, Melvin Prior, and 
Malcolm Dana. Deputation work was carried on as usual in the near-by towns. 

Toward the spring the Y financed a drive to aid the students here to find sum- 
mer employment. They also cooperated with the Religious Council in the con- 
ducting of Vesper Services, making them a regular feature. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED ELEVEN 




THE 

I ^ O ^ '' ifUi. "W M' 'Hiliiiifcniimlt 





Y. W. C. A. CABINET 



OFFICERS 



President 
Vice-president 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



World Fellowship 
Membership 
Social Welfare 

Music 
Town Girls 
Conventions 
Social Serz'ice 
Industrial 
Publicity 



Edith Lerrigo, '32 

Mildred IMoyer, '2i?> 

Olive Grover, '34 

Carol Sylvester, '^2 



COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 



Elizabeth Taylor, '32 

Marjorie Boothby, '33 

Violet Blanchard, '32 

Evelyn Rolfe, '33 

Doris Mooney, 'Z2 

Julia Briggs, '32 

Muriel Bliss, 'Z2 

Muriel Gower, '2)2 

Eva Sonstroem, '2)2> 

Elizabeth Lord, '33' 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWELVE 




THE .■■"-■■- "^^^'^^ 

19 32 II -ILbM 



Y. W. C. A. 

One of the most active student organizations on the campus this year has been 
the Y. W. C. A. Weekly meetings were held in the "Y" room in Rand Hall, 
where cabinet and group discussions were held. 

The members unite in the desire to realize full and creative life through a 
growing knowledge of God and determine to have a part in making this life possi- 
ble for all people, seeking in this task to follow Jesus and understand Him. 

The outstanding features of the program this year have been the student dis- 
cussion groups which were sponsored by both the Y. M. and Y. W. A larger 
attendance than ever before proved their success. It was only through the coopera- 
tion of both the Y's with the Religious Council that this valuable activity had place. 

The organization is still helping to put Hazel Ling through the Yenching Union 
Medical College at Peking. For this purpose a bridge was held February 18 at 
Rand Hall under the direction of Elizabeth Taylor, '32. 

Much credit is due to Christine Stone, '32, and Rebecca Carter, '33, for their 
splendid work and favorable financial results with the "Money Making Blues", the 
annual Christmas bazaar. The annual banquet this year, March 15, was in the 
capable hands of Muriel Gower, '32, and Thelma Kittredge, '33. 

The organization sent a representative to the Student-Faculty Conference at 
Northfield, December 4, and with the aid of the Religious Council sent four 
representatives to the Student Volunteer Convention at Buffalo, New York, Decem- 
ber 30 to January 4. 

Aside from these outstanding features the group is endeavoring to create a 
truly Christian atmosphere in the community by the work of various cabinet 
members and by the Y. W. meetings for the college girls every Wednesday night. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTEEN 




Mi&Tloi^ 

■ 19 32 





THE COUNCIL ON RELIGION 



Cha 



inuaii 



Faculty Representative 
Student Keprescntatives 



Dr. Rayborn L. Zerby 

Mrs. Fred C. M.\bee 

Edith M. Lerrigo, President of Y. \V. C. A. 
Howard E. Paige, President of Y. M. C. A. 



LuciLK EouLGER, Elden H. Dustin, General Student Representatives 

The Council on Religion was established as a result of a meeting called in the 
spring of 1931 by Pres. Gray and composed of persons interested in the religious 
program of Bates. Throughout the year it has held regular weekly meetings and 
several special meetings. Its purpose is to coordinate the several campus religious 
groups in their efiforts to make religion a more vital thing on campus, and to take 
charge of matters religious untouched by either the Y's or the Cosmos Club. This 
year it has been in charge of a series of Vesper services, the good attendance at 
which has proved the value of such meetings. It has devoted much earnest atten- 
tion to the chapel situation. The cross and candlesticks used in the Vespers the 
last of the year were purchased through the Council. Dr. Zerby has been 
the prime mover and inspiration for all of the projects of the Council. His 
effort to give religion "a local habitation and a name" in the College is great and 
inspirational. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FOURTEEN 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTEEN 




THE 



Mlf^I^Ot^ 



932 





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PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTEEN 




THE 

9 32 ' - 



S I 




THE BATES STUDENT 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



Editor-iii-Chicf 
Managing Editor 
General N^ews Editor 
Sports Editor 
hitercollcgiatc Editor 
Business Manager 
Jf'outcn's Editor 
Debate Editor 
U'onuvi's Athletics 



Valery BURATI, 'iZ 

Elden H. Dustin, '32 

William Dunham, '32 

Parker Mann, '32 

Mary Hoag, '32 

Robert LaBoyteaux, '32 

Dorothy Fuge, '32 

Shirley Cave, '32 

Althea Howe, '32 



Margaret Bateman, '32 
Muriel Bliss, '32 
Vesta Brown, '32 
Augusta Cohen, '32 
Bertha W. Critchell, '32 
Parker J. Dexter, '32 
Robert Manson, '32 
Rosamond Nichols, '32 
Elizabeth Seigel, '32 
Randolph Weatherbee, 
Helen Ashe, '33 
Ruth Bcnhani, '33 



'32 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Frank Byron, '33 
Roger Derby, '33 
Mildred Hoflywood, '33 
Amy Irish, '33 
Lucile Jack, '33 
Florence James, '33 
Thelma Kittredge, '33 
Ciive Knowles, '33 
Dorothy O'Hara, '33 
Dawn Orcutt, '33 
Alice Purington, '33 
Margaret Ranlett, '33 



Samuel Scolnik, '33 
Dorothy Staples, '33 
Elinor Williams, '33 
Kenneth Wood, '33 
Marjorie Bennett, '34 
Nancy Crockett, '34 
Doris W. McAllister, '34 
Frank Murray, '34 
Thomas Musgrave, '34 
Albert Oliver, '34 
Theodore Seamon, '34 



COLUMNISTS 



Maxfield Gordon, '32 



Norman MacDonald, '32 



Vincent Belleau, '33 
Nathan Milbury, '34 



MANAGING DEPARTMENT 
John Hanley, '34 James Balano, '34 

Isidore Arik, '34 Bond Perry, '35 



A. J. Latham, Jr., '33 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 
Edward Wilmot, '33 Harold E. 

Charles Whipple, '34 



Smith, '34 



As its list of accomplishments for the year 1931-1932, the student may enumerate the 
following: Enlargement of the paper; stabilization of its finances; economizing in printing 
costs; establisliment of business department with adequate records; establishment of a Stu- 
dent office ; increased circulation ; shortened printing time ; increased scope in news and fea- 
ture articles; the sealing of a bond of friendship with townspeople. 

In its editorial and news policies an attempt has been made to broaden the influence of 
THE STUDENT, to comment and carry information on events and topics of more than campus 
interest, the student has stood for openness of expression, and for humanizing, without 
sensationalizing, its columns. 

Specific campus movements, initiated, pressed, and to some extent accomplished by the 
student have been the following : A General College Election, which for the first time 
proved its worth this year; reform of Freshman Initiation and abolishment of the Garnet 
Key ; the student pleaded for and secured faculty permission for Sunday skating ; it spon- 
sored the All-Club Congress for club reorganization ; it undertook the initiative and the 
management of radio-broadcasting by Bates music organizations. 

The stafT of the student was the largest in the history of the paper, this year; the 
number of special issues was increased; and encouragement was given for lively forum dis- 
cussions. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTEEN 




' ■ iQ32 





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PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTEEN 




THE 

- ' n932 



■^ 






THE BATES MIRROR 



THE STAFF 



Editor-in-Chief 
Associate Editor 
Business Manager 
Associate Business Manager 
Advertising Managers 
Circulation Manager 
Personal Editors 



Elden Dustin 

Doris Mooney 

Robert Manson 

Althea Howe 

Clifton Jacobs, Lawrence Parker 

Bernard Sprafke 

Shirley Cave, Norman MacDonald 



Associate Personal Editors 



Clinton Dill 
Abe Mandelstam 
Leonard ]\IillEn 
Dorothy Fuge 
Augusta Cohen 
Rosamond Nichols 

Faculty Editor 

Society Editors 

Debating Editors 

Art Editor 

Associate Art Editors 

Photographic Editors 

Dramatic Editor 

Athletic Editors 

Humor Editor 

Historical Editor 

Specialty Editor 



ALashe Lightman 
Bernard Sprafke 
Elizabeth Seigel 
Muriel Gower 
Frances Cronin 

LUCILE FoULGER 

LUCILE FoULGER 

Gertrude Diggery, Parker Dexter 

Edith Lerrigo, Harrison GreenlEaf 

Randolph Weatherbee 

Elizabeth Lord, Aubigne Gushing 

Stanley Everett, Robert LaBoyteaux, Paul Swan 

jMargaret Hines 

Grace Page, Parker Mann 

Maxfield Gordon 

]\Lary Hoag 

Elmer Mitchell 



It has Ijeen the goal of the L^32 ALrror Board meml)ers to make the Bates 
Year Book give a faitlifnl picture of the more jjermanent Bates ideals and institu- 
tions, and of contemporary activities. 

We wish to admit an indebtedness to the editors of last year's Mirror for the 
precedent of a l)ook placed on a sound financial basis. We feel that we have con- 
tributed something to the future assured successes of the Mirror by cooperating 
with the Publishing Association to formulate a plan for continuity in administra- 
tion of the l)ook and for its closer supervision by the Association. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETEEN 




1932 





THE GARNET 



OFFICERS 



Editor-iii-Chicf 
Assistant Editors 

Business Maiuif/cr 



Valery Burati, '32 

Charlotte Cutts, '3?! 

Abbott Smith, '35 

Robert KaBoyteaux. '32 



Two issues of The Garnet, one in March and the other in May, were puh- 
lished this year. The first number was entirely given over to the more creative 
writing of poetry and fiction, while an elTort was made to liroaden the scope of 
the second number by including scientific, religious, political, and historic treatises, 
with further ])ublication of statements from well-known men concerning '"The 
American College and The Spirit of Liberalism". 

The Commencement Issue is further distinguished by the publication in it of 
several contributions by Bates alumni, who accepted the editor's invitation to 
contribute. 

It is felt that the two issues of The Garnet published this year maintain the 
standard set by the three numbers issued last year. It is realized, however, that 
onlv consistent and vigorous work on the part of the editors and contributors will 
be able to maintain the magazine at its present level in subsequent years. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY 




THE 



• ' I 9 32 





Bates College Publishing Association 



OFFICERS 



President 
Vice-president 
Secretary 
Treasurer 

Student Members 



Faculty Members 



William Dunham, '32 
Clifton Jacobs, '32 
Shirley Cave, '32 
Dr. Amos Hovey 
Ruth Benham, 'ii 
Valery Burati, '32 
Roger Crafts, 'ii 
Mrs. Blanche Roberts 
Dr. Edwin Wright 



The Bates College Publishing Association, although placing the direction of its 
policies in a body called Board of Directors, nevertheless includes every student 
subscriber to The Bates Student. Each year the student body as a whole elects 
officers and representatives to the Board of Directors, in whom trust for the con- 
duct of the Association's affairs is placed. 

It is the duty of the Directors to appoint the Editor-in-Chief of The Student, 
and to call for periodical financial reports from the administration of the under- 
graduate weekly. It is also the duty of the Board to select the editor of The 
Garnet. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE 








<^"m 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO 




CEBATINC 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE 




THE 



1932 





DEBATING COUNCIL 

OFFICERS 

President, Norman MacDonald, '32 

Vice-president, Edith Lerrigo, '32 

Managers. I.awrknce Parker, '32; Shirley Cave, '32 
MEMBERS 

John M. Carroll, '32 
Shirley Cave, '32 
William Dunham, '32 
Harrison Greenleaf, '32 
Edith Lerrigo, '32 
Norman MacDonald, '32 
Lawrence Parker, '32 
Randolph Weatherbee, '32 
Rebecca Carter, '33 
Helen Hamlin, '33 
Lionel Lemieux, '33 
Eva Sonstroem, '33 
Frank Murray, '34 

The Debating Council is composed of two kinds of members, the perman- 
ent members who are Varsity debaters and those debating squad members 
who hold membership for the year and who are members of the s(|uad by 
virtue of competitive trials. The Council manages the intercollegiate debates 
and the Interscholastic Debating League. It has continued the practice 
started last year of sponsoring Junior Varsity debates and has inaugurated 
the new feature of a freshman debating squad. 



Theodore Seamon, '34 


Clyde Holbrook, '34 


Powers MacLean, '35 


Wendell May, '34 


Walter Norton, '35 


Albert Oliver, '34 


Margaret Perkins, '35 


Lillian Bean, '35 


Bond Perry, '35 


Carl Cubberley. '35 


John Pierce, '35 


John Dority, '35 


Orimer Bugbee, '32 


Gordon Jones, '35 


Lucile Jack, '33 


John Khouri, '35 


Thelma Kittredge, '33 


Robert Lawrance, '35 


Gerald Stevens, '33 


Charlotte Longley, '35 


Frank Wimmer, '33 


Howard Norman, '35 


James Baiano, '34 


Ray Stetson '35 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR 




THE ^u^ M 

' ^ ^ ^ !932 „ ■..^..•i^JLiHM 



DELTA SIGMA RHO 

OFFICERS 

President, Louis B. Costello, '96 

Secretary-Treasurer. Yvonne L. Berkelman, '28 

The IJelta Sigma Rhcj is the National Honor Forensic Fraternity. A 
minimum requirement for entrance is a status of Junior in College and parti- 
cipation in two intercollegiate debates. Admission is purely honorary; 
Delta Sigma Kho is the Phi Beta Kappa of debating. Election to this hon- 
orary society in which Bates holds the only Maine Chapter has been awarded 
to the following people this year: Lawrence C. Parker, 'i2; John ^l. Carroll, 
Jr., '22; William H. Dunham, '32; Harrison C. Greenleaf, '32; Shirley Cave, '32; 
and Edith IVT. Lerrigo, '32. The formal initiation will take place at the annual 
meeting of Delta Sigma Rho which is held at commencement. Randolph Weather- 
bee, '32 and Norman MacDonald, '22. the two foremost class of 1932 debaters, 
gained membershij) in the fraternity in their Junior year. 

THE EASTERN INTERCOLLEGIATE DEBATING LEAGUE 

With two championships to its credit out of three years of membership 
in the Eastern Intercollegiate Debating League, Bates again has reason to 
be proud of its debaters. This year Norman MacDonald, '32; Randolph 
Weatherbee, '32; Frank Murray, '34; Lawrence Parker, '32; Theodore Sea- 
men, '34; and Harrison Greenleaf, '32 were the men who composed the teams 
that won the championship. They were victorious in a series of twelve 
debates and lost only two judge's votes. They competed in a series which 
included debates with Mt. Holyoke, Smith, Amherst, Brown, Lafayette and 
Yale. Other colleges in the League are Pennsylvania, Princeton, Vassar, 
Wesleyan. and Williams. The subjects for the Eastern League this year 
were concerned with the League of Nations problem, the emergence of 
women from the home, and light wines and beers. 

THE MARITIME DEBATING TOUR 

Randolph W^eatherbee, '32, and Frank Murray, '34, accompanied by Prof. 
Brooks Quimby started, October 25, on a tour which brought them to four 
Canadian colleges and which resulted in four debate victories. The first 
debate was held at Dalhousie University in Halifax, and the Bates team 
upholding the negative of the question on the recognition of Russia received 
a 144-92 decision from the audience. The same subject was debated with 
similar success two nights later at Mount Allison University in Sackville, 
New Brunswick. The emergence of women from the home question was 
used at the University of King's College, in Halifax, and at the University of 
New Brunswick in Frederickton. The Bates people had only favorable com- 
ment to make about the pleasant reception they received at all these Canadian 
schools. This Maritime tour is another illustration of how the debating at 
Bates is not just glorified argument, but a means of bringing about intercol- 
legiate and international friendliness. Arrangements have already been made 
for a debate with Mt. Allison to take place at Bates next October. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE 




Mimloi^' 

s J ; . 1932 ' '" ^^' 



BRITISH UNION DEBATE 

Bates added one more name t(j its list of international opjxments in debate, 
Friday evening-, December 11. when Lawrence Parker. '32. and John Carroll, 
Jr., '32, debated the subject of tariff versus free trade with representatives 
of the British University Union. Stuart Craig of University College in 
Nottingham and John Needham of St. John's College of the University of 
Durham emphasized the values of free trade in aiding economic, political'and 
social relief, and stressed the provincial character in the artificial barriers of 
the tariff system, 'i'he Bates team, giving opposing arguments filled with 
api:)ropriate illustrations, upheld their part of the argument in a manner 
creditable to Bates debating tradition. It Avas a non-decision debate. The 
open forum which followed was a privilege which many college people and 
visitors enjoyed. 



NON-DECISION DEBATES 

In addition to the twelve League debates, Bates teams participated in non- 
decision forensic encounters with the University of Vermont, Tufts College, 
Boston College, Springfield College. New York University, University of 
Maine, and Rollins College. Those participating in these debates were 
Theodore Seamon. '34, William Dunham. '32, Harrison Greenleaf, '32, Lionel 
Lemieux, '53, Lawrence Parker, '32, Walter Norton, '35, Powers MacLean, 
'35, Bond Perry, '35, and John Pierce, '35. The subjects used concerned 
centralized control of industry, the emergence of women from the home, and 
compulsory unemployment insurance. 

One of these debates was the second radio debate for Bates competitors. 



RADIO DEBATE WITH TUFTS 

Bates' second radio debate was with Tufts and was broadcasted from 
Station WCSH, Saturday evening, January sixteenth, Harrison Greenleaf, 
'32. and Lionel Lemieux, '53, had the negative of the question, "Resolved, 
that the several states enact legislation providing for compulsory unemploy- 
ment insurance". The Tufts' debaters were John Dunk. '32, and Charles 
Bailey, '33 ; Professor Maynard. coach of del)ating at Tufts, was the presiding 
officer at the debate. 



OUT OF TOWN DEBATES 

Bates continued its custom of giving people outside of Lewiston an oppor- 
tunity to hear collegiate debaters by holding three debates in other Maine 
cities. The debate with New York University was held at Rumford, and the 
Springfield College debaters were entertained in Augusta. Both of these 
debates were non-decision. Bates' alumni in Boston had an opportunity to 
hear Bates' debaters in action March 16, when Dunham, MacLean. and Car- 
roll met debaters from Rollins College. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-SIX 




THE 

IQ32 





MEN DEBATERS 



Front row : Left to right : Lawrence Parker, '32. John Carroll, '32, Randolph Weatherbee, '32, Norman 
MacDonald, '32, Harrison Greenleaf, '32, William Dunham, '32. 

Back row: Left to right: Lionel Lemieux, 'i2, Walter Norton, '35, John Pierce, '35, Frank Murray, 
'34, Powers McLean, '35, Bond Perry. '35, Theodore Seamon, '^■j. 

CLASS PRIZE DEBATES 

The Debating" Council has on its program each year the sponsorship of 
two freshman and two sophomore prize debates. Prizes are awarded to the 
best speaker in each debate and to the members of the winning" team. One 
Sophomore subject this year was "Resolved, that a system of comprehensive 
examinations is preferable to the present system of examinations at Bates", 
and was debated by Sumner Raymond, Albert Oliver, Marjorie Bennett, and 
Robert Fitterman. Oliver was voted best speaker. "Resolved, that the 
results of the World War have tended toward the peace of the world" was a 
second sophomore subject and was debated by Willard Rand, Julius Lom- 
bardi, Clive Holbrook, Wendell May, Gault Brown, and Bernard Loomer. 
Holbrook was best speaker. On February eighth, Robert Lawrence, Howard 
Norman, Ray Stetson, Kenneth Jones, John Khouri, and John Marcous, 
Freshmen, debated the unemployment insurance topic. Freshmen girls, 
Jean Murray, Elizabeth Foster, Thurlie Additon, and Lillian Bean, choosing 
a lighter subject for discussion, debated the modern advertising problem. 
This debate was won by Jean Murray and Elizabeth Foster; Elizabeth Foster 
was best speaker. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-SEVEN 





TH F 



BATES INTERSCHOLASTIC DEBATING LEAGUE 

The nineteenth debating tournament, lield here on campus Ajiril 15 and 
16 as one in a series inaugurated In- Prof. Baird in 1912, resulted in victory 
for Portland High School. Buckfield High School was second in the com- 
petition. 

Prof. Brooks Quimby and his assistant, Edith Lerrigo, '32, began to work 
hard at the beginning of the year to arrange triangular debates between high 
schools. The question for debate this year was; "Resolved, that the several 
States enact legislation providing for compulsory unemployment insurance". 

Out of the sixty schools in the preliminary debates the following seven- 
teen schools were victorious and took part in the semi-finals held on the 
Bates Campus the evening of April 15th: Anson Academy, Phillips High 
School, Livermore Falls High School, Leavitt Institute, Houlton High 
School, Edward Little High School, Cherrytield Academy, Buckfield High 
School, Oxford High School, Bangor High School, Berwick Academy, Brook- 
lin High School, Lincoln Academy, Brunswick High School, Foxcroft Acad- 
emy, Portland High School, and Milo High School. Several of these schools 
were coached by members of the Bates Debating Council. 

The first part of the program for these teams, as they gathered at Bates, 
was a general assembly at Chase Hall where they were welcomed by Presi- 
dent Gray and Norman MacDonald, '32, president of the Debating Council. 
Particular instructions and assignments to the teams, to judges, and to time- 
keepers were given by Lawrence Parker, '32. The winners of the semi-finals, 
held in various classrooms on campus directly after this assembly, were 
Portland High School, Berwick Academy, Buckfield High School, and Bruns- 
wick High School. 

In the final debates which were held Saturday morning, April 16, Port- 
land High School was victorious and Buckfield was in second place. Both 
of these schools were eligible to attend the National High School Debating 
Tournament held at Sioux Citv, Iowa. 



JUNIOR VARSITY DEBATES 

Adopting a custom started last year of holding Junior Varsity exhibition 
debates in the fall for the benefit of the high schools, debates on the high 
school subject for the year, compulsory unemployment insurance, were given 
at Dexter and at Wells. The participants were Herbert Lawrance, Walter 
Norton, Powers MacLean, John Pierce, and Bond Perry, all Freshmen. 



FRESHMEN DEBATES 

The freshman schedule was started for the first time this year with a 
series of non-decision debates with various Maine High Schools. In each 
debate Mr. Quimby acted as critic. Debates were held with Buckfield High 
School, Deering High School, Hallowell High School, and Gardiner High 
School. The participants were Herbert Lawrance, Howard Norman, Lillian 
Bean, Charlotte Longley, Gordon Jones, John Khouri, and John Dority. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-EIGHT 




Mimloi^ 

' * • i 1932: " 





WOMEN DEBATERS 

Standing, left to right ; Rebecca Carter, '33, Margaret Perkins, "35, Helen Hamlin, 'ii. 
Seated, left to right : Shirley Cave, '32, Edith Lerrigo, 'il, Eva Sonstroem, 'ii. 

The women's debating season opened this year with a home del:)ate against 
Middlebury College, Vermont. Shirley Cave, '32. Rebecca Carter, 'i3i, and Edith 
Lerrigo, '32. upheld the negative of the question "Resolved, that the United States 
should recognize the Union of Socialist Soviet Republics", There w^as no decision 
given. 

On January 19 Eva Sonstroem, '33, and Edith Lerrigo clashed arguments with 
old Bates rivals, the University of Maine. Bates upheld the affirmative of the 
resolution that "Congress should enact legislation providing for the centralized 
control of industry", winning a unanimous decision. 

The same team, Eva Sonstroem and Edith Lerrigo, enjoyed a trip through 
New York State debating with representatives of Keuka College at Keuka Park 
and with a team at Elmira College, Each time the Bates team upheld the negative 
against the recognition of Russia. The first of these debates was non-decision and 
the second debate was won by Bates in the opinion of the expert-critic judge. 

The recognition of Russia was again argued at home by Shirley Cave .'32. and 
Margaret Perkins, '35. with a team from Temple University, Philadelphia, This 
debate was non-decision. 

On March 24 the women entertained a team from the University of Vermont, 
The subject of this non-decision debate was "Resolved that censorship of books, 
plays, magazines, and movies be abolished". Four of the debaters had met in the 
debate at Vermont last year, which fact added to the general interest. An Open 
Forum with the audience participating followed the debate. 

The women as well as the men have enjoyed an undefeated forensic season this 
year. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-NINE 



^^^WMMBIMMMiill'iiillii [ II I ii I 



re ; . 1932- " 



^•UUiu^ >utM M^ 





PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-ONE 




IQ32 



' jH^KL^JBI 







PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-TWO 




THE 

"» -.i 19 32 ■'"-•'' , 




ENGLISH 4A PLAYERS 

OFFICERS 

President, Margaret Hines, '32 

Vice-president. Parker ^L\^■^■, '32 

Secretary. Rl'Th Benham, '33 

Business Mamujer. Orlando Scoeield, '32 

Costume Mistress. Christine vStone. '32 

Stiu/e Maiuiger. (^iEorge Austin, '33 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



Professor Robinson 



Robert LaBoyteavix, 'i2 
Marjorie Briggs, 'i2 
Valery Burati, 'i2 
Margaret Hines, 'i2 
Gwendolyn Maxwell, '32 
Parker Mann, '32 



Professor Woodcock 

MEMBERS 

Orlando Scofiekl, 'i2 
Christine Stone, '32 
George Austin, 'ii 
Ruth Benham, '?:i 
John Curtis, 'ii 
Marion Hayes, '33 



Mr. March 



Clyde Holbrook. 'ii 
Walter Gerke, '33 
Edwin Prescott, '33 
Russell Milnes, '34 
Henry LaVallee, * i^t 



Following their tradition of sincere dramatic effort, the English 4A Players 
have had a very successful season, artistically and financially. 

More storage room has enabled the cluh to increase the permanent stage equip- 
ment of furniture, rugs, drapes, sets, and dressing-room facilities. In this way the 
group will eventually l)e able to have all necessities at hand without the trouble of 
building new sets for each play. Throughout the year the stage settings have been 
noteworthy for their beauty and fitness. "The Taming of the Shrew" was the 
sole production in which only drapes and a few simple pieces of furniture were 
used. The results were highly successful because the beauty of the costumes was 
shown to greater advantage, and the large cast moved about the stage without 
confusion or crowding. 

The student directors, Margaret Hines, George Austin, Ruth Benham, and 
Marjorie Briggs, deserve a great deal of credit for their able work. The stage- 
craft manager, George Austin, with his corps of workers merit the highest 
praise, as does Robert LaBoyteaux for his work in obtaining fine lighting effects. 
Orlando Scofiekl as Inisiness manager has been successful and efficient. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-THREE 




THE 



Mmi^OI^ 



932 




THREE ONE' ACT PLAYS 



Little Theater 



Hathorn Hall 



Friday, October 30, 1931 



"THE SPINSTERS OF LUSHE" 
By Philip Johnson 



Miss Charlotte Brighte 
Miss I^aetitia Thurlow 
Miss Alicia Pramley 
Miss Rosie Pramley 
Miss Lucy Pemberton 
Phoebe 



Barbara Lincoln, '35 

Charlotte Longley, '35 

Charlotte Cutts, '33 

Evelyn Rolfe, '33 

Rebecca Carter, '32 

Grace Gearing, '35 



Directed by Ruth Benham, '33 



"WHERE THE CROSS IS MADE" 
By Eugene O'Neill 



Captain Isaiah Bartlett 
Nat Bartlett, his son 
Sue Bartlett, his daughter 
Doctor Higgins 



Henry LaValleE, '33 

Clyde Holbrook, '34 

Marjorie Briggs, '32 

Bernard Drew, '34 



Directed by George Austin, '33 

"A WEDDING" 
By John Kirkpatrick 



Bob, the bridegroom 

Archie, the best man 

Alice, the bride 

Ted, a groomsman 

Mrs. Tisdale, the bridegroom's mother 

Mr. Grayson, the bride's father 

Miss Grayson, the bride's aunt 



George Orestis, '35 

Orimer Bucbee, '32 

Margaret Hines, '32 

Abbott Smith, '35 

Margaret Perkins, '35 

Russell Milnes, '34 

Elizabeth Fosdick, '35 



Directed bv ^largaret Hines, '32 



MANAGEMENT 



Costume Ali stress 
Stage Manager 
Business Manager 



Christine Stone, '32 

George Austin, '33 

Orlando ScofiEld, '32 



The 4A Players opened their season with this well balanced group of plays. 
The casts were composed mainly of players making their initial appearance with 
4A, and the audience which packed Little Theater showed its appreciation of the 
fine work done. It was also the first time that an O'Neill play has been presented 
tributed something to the future assured successes of the Mirror l)y cooperating 
of tragedy that sent shivers through the audience. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-FOUR 




THE 



MII^I^OI^ 



'm 



932 







The 1932 Varsity Play, - "GRUMPY" 

By Horace Hodges and T. Wigney Percyval 

Produced under the direction of Margaret Hines. Decemher 9 and 10 

Little Theater Hathorn Hall 

THE CAST 



Mr. Andrew Bullivant, Grumpy 

Mr. Earnest Heron, his Grand-nephew 

Ruddock, his Valet 

Mr. Jarvis 

Mr. Valentine Wolfe 

Dr. MacLaren 

Keble 

Merridew 

Virginia Bullivant, Mr. Bullivant's Grand-daughter 

Mrs. MacLaren 

Susan 

MANAGEMENT 



George Austin, '33 

John David, '34 

William Haver, '34 

Henry LaVallee, '33 

Robert Fitterman, '34 

Richard Stetson, '34 

Walter Gerke, '33 

Russell Milnes, '34 

Ruth Benham, '33 

Marjorie Briggs, '32 

Dorothy Wills, '33 



Stagecraft 

Stage Manager George Austin, '33 

Assistants 

Robert LaBoyteaux, '32 
Walter Gerke, '33 Charles Povey, '34 
Edwin Prescott, '33 John Ingraham, '35 



Costumes 



Costume Mistress 
Assistant 



Christine Stone, '32 
Thei.ma Kittredge, '33 



Business 

Business Manager Edward Wilmot, '33 
Assistant Walter Wikingstad, '34 



The Annual Varsity Play was successfully presented, and to quote a faculty 
review, "served as a reminder that Bates has good reason to he proud of its repre- 
sentatives of the stage, as well as that of the platform, the gridiron, and the 
microphone". The whole play hinged around the gruff, keen-witted character of 
"grumpy", hrilliantly played by George Austin. The stage setting was in charming 
good taste and served as a fitting background for the English mystery-comedy. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-FIVS 




THE 




<»"*uj(i. -m w.'— i- 



"LADY WINDERMERE'S FAN" 

By Oscar Wilde 

April 29 



Little Theater 

Lord Windermere 

Lord Darlington 

Lord Augustus Lorton 

Mr. Cecil Graham 

Mr. Dumby 

Mr. Hopper 

Parker 

Lady Windermere 

The Duchess of Berwick 

Lady Agatha Carlisle 

Lady Plymdale 

Lady Jedborough 

Lady Stutfield 

Mrs. Cowper-Cowper 

Mrs. Erlynne 

Rosalie 



John Curtis, '33 

John Doritv, 35 

George Austin, 'ii 

Ch.vrles Povey. "34 

Parker Dexter. 'i2 

NoRM.\N Balcom, '34 

Robert Kroepsch, 'ii 

Margaret Perkins, '35 

Charlotte Longley, '35 

Frances Cronin, 'il 

Jeannette Wilson, 'i2) 

Betty Fosdick, '35 

Miriam Wheeler, 'H 

Barbara Lincoln, '35 

Margaret Hines, '32 

Thelma Poulin, '35 



Directed by Marjorie Briggs, 'Z2, and Ruth Benham, 'iZ 

The largest advance ticket sale of the year showed the interest taken in tlie 4A 
Players' revival of Oscar Wilde's classic of social comedy, and a full, eager house 
keenly enjoyed every moment of the play as it swung from pathos to comedy. 
The large cast was uniformly good in portraying the highly artificial members of 
English society. From every angle it was one of the most effective and brilliant 
productions of the year. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-SIX 




TH E 

jmamtmim'mmumrnii^ " I =7 O .^ <m^u. Mill Ml..n"i MiiiiiiM 




Fifth Annual Shakespearean Play 



Little Theater 



Hathorn Hall 



'THE TAMING OF THE SHREW" 

Presented Thursday and Friday, March 10 and 11, under the direction of Pro- 
fessor Grosvenor M. Rol)inson. 



THE CAST 

Baptista, a gentleman of Padua 
Vincentio, a merchant of Pisa 
Lucentio, son of Vincentio 
Petruchio, a gentleman of Verona 
Gremio, suitor of Bianca 
Hortensio, suitor of Bianca 
Tranio, servant to Lucentio 
Biondello, servant to Lucentio 
Grumio, servant to Petruchi<j 
Curtis, servant to Petruchio 
A Pedant 
A Tailor 

Katharina, daughter of Baptista 
Bianca, daughter of Baptista 
A Widow 
Other Servants to Petruchio 

Powers McLe 
Robert E. Rutledge, 
Servant 
Page 



Henrv L. LaVallee 

Leoyd F. George 

John A. Curtis 

Clyde A. Holbrook 

George R. Austin 

Bernard T. Drew 

John A. David 

Robert Fitterman 

Russell H. Milnes 

William E. Haver 

Lester P. Gross 

Walter L. Gerke 

R. Marjorie Briggs 

Ruth T. Benham 

Evelyn Rolfe 

\N. '35; Charles G. Povey 

'34; Theodore L Seamon 

George Orestis 

Dorothy E. Wills 



M 
ii 
34 
33 
34 
34 
34 
34 
35 
34 
2>2> 
32 
2>Z 

34 
34 
35 
2>2> 







PART I 


Scene 1. 
Scene 2. 
Scene 3. 
Scene 4. 
Scene 5. 
Scene 6. 
Scene 7. 


Before Baptista's House. 
Before Hortensio's House. 
Baptista's House 
Baptista's Garden. 
Baptista's House. 
Baptista's Garden. 
Baptista's House. 






INTERVAL 






PART n 


Scene 
Scene 
Scene 
Scene 
Scene 


1. 
2 

I 
4. 

5. 


Petruchio's House. 
Near Baptista's House. 
Petruchio's House. 
Before Baptista's House. 
A Puhlic Place. 


Scene 


6. 


Before Lucentio's Lodging 


Scene 


7. 


Lucentio's House. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-SEVEN 



BPf 



THE 



Mmi^OI^ 



932 




MANAGEMENT 
Stagecraft 



Stage Manager 

Assistants 



Property Man 
Electricians 



Costume Mistress 
Assistant 



Business Manager 
Assistant 



George R. Austin, "33 

Walter L. Gerke, '33 

Edwin H. Prescott, '33 

Haroed F. Goulston, '33 

William M. Thornton, '34 

Glidden M. Parker, '35 

Charles G. Povey, '34 

Robert LaBoyteaux, '32 

[ULIUS S. LoMBARDI, '34 



Costumes 



Christine W. Stone, '32 
Thelma L. Kittredge, '33 



Managers 



Orlando F. Scofield, '32 
Edward J. Wilmot, '33 



Katherine and Petruchio fought their way merrily through the "Taming of the 
Shrew" much to the amusement of the audience, who very often hurst into spon- 
taneous laughter. It is not exaggeration to say that it was the hest of the annual 
Shakespearean productions to date. Every character played his part perfectly, the 
costumes were especially attractive, and the whole performance went off with a 
smoothness and finish that showed the expert direction of Professor Rohinson. 



THE HEELERS' CLUB 



AI Howe, '32 
Frances Cronin, '32 
Lucile Foulger, 'i2 
Edith Lerrigo, 'i2 
Parker Dexter, '32 
Bruce Patterson, '^i 
Robert Kroepsch, 'ii 
Frank Wood, '33 
Kenneth Campbell, '34 
Lloyd George, "34 
Howard Trafton, '34 
Charlotte Cutts, '3i 
Dorothy Penney, '33 
Rebecca Carter, '33 



MEMBERS 

Thelma Kittredge, '3i 
William Haver, '35 
Robert Fitterman, '34 
Dorothy Wills, '3i 

Miriam Wheeler, '34 
Abbott Smith, '35 
Thelma Poulin, '35 
Edward DeMeyer. '35 
Frances Hayden, '35 
Elizabeth Fosdick, '35 
Grace Gearing, '35 
Barbara Lincoln, '35 
Charlotte Longley, '35 

Teannette Wilson, *3i 



Ralph Long, 'i2 
Evelyn Farnham, '34 
William Fnrtwengler, 
Orimer Bugbee, '32 
John Dority, '35 
George Orestis, '35 
Bernard Drew, '33 
Edward Higgins. '35 
Theodore Seamon. '34 
Robert Vernon, '35 
Edward McLean, '35 
Evelyn Rolfe, '3i 



'32 



The Heelers' Cluh is a subsidiary to the 4A Club and was organized three years 
ago. Membership is given to those who have proved their ability as actors at try- 
outs in the fall. During the year these members read plays before the 4A Club, 
or take part in the 4A productions. Meml^ers of Heelers are elected into the 
Players when they have proved their worth in two productions publicly presented 
by the 4A Players. This year many of the casts were drawn from the ranks of 
Heelers, building up their experience for the time when they will be meml)ers of 
the 4A Players. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-NINE 




THE 





THE BAND 

OFFICERS 

Director, Gilbert Clapperton, '32 

Drum Major, John Curtis, 'ZZ 

Manager. Harold Henckel, '32 



Trumpets 
W. Buker, '34 
R. Carter, '32 
C. Chapman, '35 
W. Chute. '35 
F. Donald, '33 
E. Kimbail, '35 
J. Oliver, '35 
C. Povey, '34 
W. Wikingstad, '34 

Altos 
M. Welsch, '34 
H. Stahl, '35 

Baritones 
C. Holbrook, '34 
R Elliott, '32 
W. SuttcHffe, '35 



MEMBERS 

H. Turner, '34 

Drums 
B. Antine, '33 
J. Latham, '34 
A. Ruegg, '34 
E. Small, '34 

Piccolos 
J. David, '34 
D. Ham, 'ii 

Saxophones 
N. DeMarco, '34 
R. Johnson, '34 
S. Harris, '35 
E Prescott, '33 

Clarinets 
R. Axtell, '32 
P. Carpenter, '33 



E. Dolan, '35 

E. Lelyveld, '34 
S. Richards, '34 
R. Tuttle, '34 
M. Tabbutt, '34 
K. Wood, '33 

C Anicetti, '35 

C. Heldman, '35 

Trombones 

F. Call, '35 
R. Crafts, '33 
J. Cooper, '34 

G. Turner, '34 

Tubas 

A. Roundsville, '35 
F. Wood, 'ii 



This year marked the second and final year for "Gil" as the director of the 
band. Last year, due to the increased duties of Prof. Crafts, he was forced to 
turn the baton over to Clapperton. It has been "Gil's" aim to have the best college 
band in the state and one that could hold its own with similar sized schools outside 
the state. 

This year the band has played for all the athletic events, rallies, and assemblies. 
In the spring they plan to put on an open air concert on the campus. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY 




THE 

f"'l ilr-'V ' * ''I 7 O ^ ' ' u^^.., '-ai 





MACFARLANE CLUB 

OFFICERS 

President, MarjoriE Briggs, '32 

Vice-president, Gilbert Clapperton, '32 

Secretary, Gertrude White, '32 

Treasurer, Clifton Jacobs, '32 



Ruth Barrel!, '32 
Marian Blake, '32 
Marjorie Briggs, '32 
Robert Carter, '32 
Gilbert Clapperton, '32 
Helen Foss, '32 
Lucile Foulger, '32 
Priscilla Goodwin, '32 
Muriel Gower, '32 
Clifton Jacobs, '32 
Betty JIann, '32 
Parker Mann, "il 
Muriel McLeod, '32 



MEMBERS 

Howard Paige, '32 
Eleanor Robie, '32 
Margaret Renwick, '32 
Frances Stevens, ^Z2 
Bernard Sprafke, '32 
Geraldine Wilson, '32 
Gertrude White, '32 
Gertrude Young, '32 
Charlotte Cutts, '33 
Roger Crafts, '33 
Fred Donald, '33 
Phyllis Oilman, '33 
Virginia Moulton, 'ii 



Inge von Mueller, '33 
Gwendolyn Spear, '33 
Gerald Stevens, 'ii 
John Stevens, 'ii 
Franklin Wood, '33 
Kenneth Wood, 'ii 
Sylvester Carter, '34 
John David, '34 
Norman DeMarco, '34 
Alden Gardiner, '34 
Edward Small, '34 
Almus Thorp, '34 



The Macfarlane Club was organized in 1917 and named for Will C. Macfar- 
lane, composer, and former municipal organist in Portland. The club is a large 
factor in stimulating an interest on campus in things musical. 

The programs of the meetings this year have consisted of lectures on subjects 
famous in music, and illustrative musical selections by the members. (Jutstanding 
among these programs were evenings devoted to "Modern Music", and to the 
"The Flying Dutchman" with Dr. Leonard as speaker. The "Faculty Night" 
program in charge of Mrs. Berkelman was very enjoyable, and the Lenten Service 
under the direction of Prof. Crafts went ofT with beautiful, rich, simplicity. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-ONE 




THE 

MII^I^OI^ 






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THE GARNET TRUMPETERS 

First Trumpet, Fred Donald, 'ii 

Second Trumpet, James ( )liver, '34 

Third Trumpet. Clifton Jacobs, '32 

Fourth Trumpet, Charles Povey, 'H 

The Garnet Trumpeters, organized this year, have made a unique contribution 
to Bates musical Hfe. Their first appearance was in a Student Assembly where 
the clear, militant notes of the trumpets delighted the audience. Introduced as the 
Garnet "Riveters" Ijy the genial Student Council president, this ai)pellation has 
remained in dormitory parlance. 

The quartet has played at meetings of the Kiwanis and Rotary Clul)s, and has 
accompanied other musical organizations on their trips. They were enthusiastically 
applauded at the concert for the benefit of the unemployed, held in the City Hall 
in March. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-TWO 




THE 

: n : 1932 /-^i-' 





MEN'S GLEE CLUB 



OFFICERS 

President, Bernard Sprafke, '32 

Secretary-Treasurer, Clieton Jacobs, '32 
Manager, Paul Broggi. 'il 

Accompanist. Almus Thorp, '2>i 

Director, Professor Seldon Crafts 

The Men's Glee Cluh, under the skillful leadership of Professor Crafts, has 
made a reputation for fine musical programs which extends well Ijeyond local 
circles. Its first appearance this year was at the Pop Concert in the Gym. The 
Cluh was one of the features of the L'nemployment P>enefit Concert in the City 
Hall. It made several tri])s to outlying communities where it sang hefore large 
audiences. Several selections hy this group formed jfart of the Bates radio hroad- 
casts over W'CSH. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-THREE 




THE 



■ ■ 19 32 -•" ^ 




#*MiMi. ■'^ W 




WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB 

OFFICERS 

President, Marian Blake, '32 

Manager, Gertrude White, '32 

Pianist. Eleanor Robie, '32 



Marian Blake, '32 
Marjorie Briggs, '32 
Helen Foss, 'i2 
Muriel Gower, '32 
Priscilla Goodwin, '32 
Muriel McLeod, '32 
Betty Mann, '32 
Doris Mooney, '32 
Gertrude White, '32 



MEMBERS 

Charlotte Cutts, '33 
Amy Irish, '33 
Inge von Mueller, '33 
Evelyn Rolfe, '33 
Eleanor Robie, '33 
Eucienne Blanchard, '34 
Helen Goodwin, '34 
Ruth Rounds, '34 
Crescentia Zahn. '34 



Regina Cantlin, '35 
Frances Eckhardt, '35 
Betty Fosdick, '35 
Eleanor Goodwin, '35 
Charlotte Harmon, '35 
Irma Raymond, '35 
June Sawyer, '35 



The Women's Glee Club is another Bates mvisical oro^anization which 
Professor Crafts leads annually in a successful season. This year the pro- 
gram of activities for the Club has included several out-of-town trips. The 
girls also provided many minutes of pleasing entertainment at the annual 
Pop Concert held in the Gym after the Christmas vacation, and as a feature 
of the Unemployment Concert held in the City Hall in March. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-FOUR 




THE 
: M ! IQ32 f 





BATES LITTLE SYMPHONY 



MEMBERS 



Saxophones and Woodwinds 
Stanley Harris, '35 
Richard Tuttle, '34 
Kenneth Wood, '33 

Trumpets 

Frederick Donald, '33 
James Oliver, '35 
Charles Povey, '34 

Cello 

Clyde Holbrook, '34 
Violin 

Norman DeMarco, '34 



Flute and Piccolo 

John David, '34 
Banjo and Guitar 

Franklin Wood, '33 
Percussion and Xylophone 

Edward Small, '34 

Piano 

Thomas Gormley, '33 

Conductor 

Gilbert Clapperton, '32 



The Bates Little Symphony under the direction of Gilbert Clapperton is also 
a newcomer among Bates musical clubs. However, it has proved to be one of 
the most popular. 

The members of the Little Symphony give to the audiences at Bates and else- 
had a featured part on the several programs that have been broadcasted over the 
and extravaganzas to specially arranged current dance melodies. 

The group plays for the larger dances and glee club concerts. This year it has 
had a featured part on the several programs that have been broadcasted over the 
radio from the Portland station. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-FIVE 




TI_I p 



*"** %l 


rl^l 


^_^ 


n»i«F-r 






GARNET REVELLERS 

MEMBERS 

First Tenor. Thomas GormlEy, '33 

Second Tenor. Bernard Sprafke. '32 

Baritone, Franklin Wood, '33 

f'ass. LIowARD Paige, '32 

The Garnet Revellers appeared for the first time in public this year at the 
annual Pop Concert in the Gym. wSince then they have api^eared at many campus 
functions, and in addition they have accompanied the Glee Club on most of its trips 
and presented a fine contribution to the proi^Tam. They have also furnished enter- 
tamment for local clubs and banquets. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-SIX 




Mimloi^ 

: ! ; ; 1932^" 



'■mKm 



^^H iiflilBi 



*' i f A,* « I . 

i, * 55 ^ I I I , t 



t #N 



BATES COLLEGE CHOIR 

OFFICERS 

President, Doris Mooney, '32 

Monitor, Howard Paige, '32 

Librarian, Frank Murray, '34 

Director, Seldon T. Crafts 



Marian Blake, 'i2 
Marjorie Briggs, '32 
Lucile Foulger, 'i2 
Muriel Gower, '32 
Kate Hall, '32 
Doris Mooney, '32 
Howard Paige, '32 
Bernard Sprafke, '32 
Gertrude White, '32 



MEMBERS 

George Austin, 'ii 
Charlotte Cutts. 'ii 
Eleanor Libbey, '33 
Edwin Prescott. 'ii 
Gerald Stevens, 'ii 
John Stevens, 'ii 
Lucienne Blanchard, '34 
Sylvester Carter, '34 
John David, '34 



Alden Gardiner, "34 
Frank Murray, '34 
Robert Rutledge, '34 
Melvin Welsch, "34 
Regina Cantlin, '35 
John Pierce, '35 
R. Stowell Ware, '35 



The Bates College Choir is at least one feature of the chapel situation which 
escapes criticism. Its weekly anthem is the only certain method of putting a 
temporary lull in the confusion of activities of the large congregation, and its 
courageous singing of unfamiliar hymns has been the salvation of more than one 
chapel speaker. 

The Choir, al)ly directed by Seldon T. Crafts, has assisted in the Vesper Ser- 
vices sponsored by the Religious Council. It is fortunate to have with it still a 
baritone soloist of great ability, Sylvester Carter. Lucienne Blanchard is a new 
soprano soloist. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-SEVEN 




s ! ■ : 1932;— i-' 





BATES MALE QUARTET 



John Pierce. '35 
Alden Gardiner, 'M 
Sylvester Carter. '34 
Edward Prescott. '33 



First Tenor 

Second Tenor 

Baritone 

Bass 



This latest of Bates musical societies was organized in January, 1932. 
Sylvester Carter, well known baritone soloist, was the originator of the 
group. 

After several weeks of careful training under the direction of Mr. Carter, 
the quartet made its initial appearance at a meeting of the Macfarlane Club. 
The first public appearance of the quartet was at the Concert for the benefit 
of the unemployed held in March in the City Hall where a large audience 
expressed enthusiastic approval of the newcomers in musical circle by 
demanding several encores. The quartet has accompanied the Glee Club on 
its more recent trips but has not been organized long enough to do a great 
deal this year. 

The purpose of the quartet is to interpret artistically real classical music. 
Through the af:)le tutelage of Mr. Carter a good start has been made in the 
rendition of negro spirituals. This is not a primary interest of the group, 
however. 

The quartet intends to continue its work next year to fill a unique and 
valuable place in Bates musical organizations. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-EIGHT 




THE 

•SI: 1932^' " i' 





BATES ORPHIC SOCIETY 



Violins 
Norman DeMarco, '34 
Celia Thompson, '33 
Joyce Foster, '35 
Horace Turner, '33 
Harry Kemp, 'ii 
Ruth Rounds, '34 
Elwood Beane, '35 
Frances Webb, '35 
Powers McLean, '35 
William Scolnik, '35 
WilHam H. Scolnik, '35 
Josiah Smith, '35 
Norman Rainville, '35 



Cellos 
Clyde Holbrook, '34 
Volney Bragg, '35 

Bass Viols 
Stella Clemants, '35 
Norman Lafayette, '35 

Flute 
John David, "ii 

Clarinets 
Robert Axtell, 'i2 
John Ingraham, '35 
Sumner Richards, '34 



Trumpets 
Fred Donald, 'ii 
Clifton Jacobs, '32 

Trombone 
George Turner, '34 

Piano 
Frances Stevens, '32 

Tympani 
Gilbert Clapperton, '32 

Director 
Professor Seldon Crafts 



The Bates Orphic Society is one of the largest of Bates musical organiza- 
tions and is open to both men and women. Its aim is to encourage interest 
in and appreciation for classical music as interpreted instrumentally. 

Through the patient and skillful leadership of Professor Crafts, the Orphic 
Society has made real progress ; it has made important and valuable contri- 
butions to Bates musical programs. The Society took part in the annual 
Pop Concert in the Alumni Gymnasium, and also in the Unemployed Benefit 
Concert where it shared honors in the fine program with other Bates musical 
groups. 

Much fine talent from the freshman class helps to keep the Orphic Society 
on a high standard. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-NfNE 




'■11)932" 





CHASE HALL 'campus avenue entrance) 




MEM-BOOK MEMENTOES 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-ONE 




THE 



1932 





COSMOS CLUB 



OFFICERS 

President, Clive Knowles, '33 

Vice-president, HelEn Foss, '32 

Secretary, Dorothy Penney, '33 

Treasurer. Donald Bond, '33 



Elden Dustin. '32 
Helen Foss, '32 
Esther Jackson, '32 
Irvill King, '32 
Edith Lerrigo, '32 
Rushton Long, '32 
Geraldine Maloon, ' 
George Moore, '32 
Howard Paige, '32 
Elizabeth Taylor, 



32 



32 



MEMBERS 

Lewis Tillson, '32 
Mildred V^ining, '32 
Josephine Barnett, '33 
Donald Bond, 'ii 
Clayton Hall, '3i 
Stanley Jackson, '3i 
Margaret Johnson, ^^3 
Harry Kemp, ^Si 
Clive Knowles, *i3 
Mildred Moyer, 'ii 



Dawn Orcutt, '33 
Dorothy Penney, '3i 
Gerald Stevens, '33 
Mary Swasey, '33 
Angela D'Errico, '34 
Alden Gardiner, '34 
Clyde Holbrook, '34 
Bernard Loomer, '34 
Ruth Rounds, '34 
Crescentia Zahn, '34 



Nine years ago the Cosmos Clul) was organized to aid the students who wished 
to enter some branch of Christian service in making a choice of their field. The 
organization aims to provide fellowship for its members and promote interest in 
current religious problems. Each fall and spring an initiation ceremony is con- 
ducted at Thorncrag. 

This year the club presented and discussed the problems of the dilTerent forms 
of religious and social work. Members and special speakers participated in these 
discussions. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-TWO 




-ri_j p 

' '■ ■ 1932 ^ 





LA PETITE ACADEMIE 

OFFICERS 

President, Jeannette Gottesfeld, '32 

J 'ice-president, KatherinE LaMontagne, 'i2 
Secretary, Augusta Cohen, '32 

Treasurer, Bernice Burnham, '32 



Ruth Barrell, '32 
Albert Bernard, '32 
Elizabeth Best, '32 
Marian Blake, '32 
Muriel Bliss, '32 
Bernice Burnham, '32 
Blanche Cassista, '32 
Augusta Cohen, '32 
Rebecca Cousins, '32 
Elden Dustin, '32 
Emily Finn, '32 
Prudent Fortin, '32 
Priscilla Goodwin, '32 
Jeannette Gottesfeld, '32 



MEMBERS 

Bernard Grant, '32 
Martin Hubbard, '32 
Esther Jackson, '32 
Katherine LaMontagne, '32 
Betty Mann, '32 
Muriel McLeod, '32 
Rosamond Nichols, '32 
Grace Page, '32 
Margaret Renwick, '32 
Frances Stevens, '32 
Dorothy Sullivan, '32 
Mildred Vining, '32 
Geraldine Wilson, '32 
Gertrude Young, '32 



Mildred Carrier, '33 
Charlotte Cutts, '33 
Dorothy Diggery, '33 
Beatrice Dumais, '33 
Helen Hamlin, '33 
Henry LaVallee, '33 
Elizabeth Lord, '3i 
Eda Osano, '3i 
Pierre Provost, '33 
Marcella Shapiro, '33 
Barbara Stuart, '33 
Elinor Williams, '33 



La Petite Academic has as its aim the stimulation of interest in the literature 
and in the life of the French people. 

For the first time since its inception, the French club this year entered into 
relations with "L'Ours Blanc", the French club at Bowdoin, and hopes, by con- 
tinuing these series of joint programs, to help to maintain social and intellectual 
friendliness between the two colleges through the medium of the French depart- 
ments. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-THREE 




THE 
19 32 " 





SPOFFORD CLUB 



President, Valery Burati, '32 



OFFICERS 



Secretary-Treasurer, Gertrude Diggery, '32 



Valery Burati, '32 
John Carroll, '32 
Shirley Cave, '32 
Marion Crosby, '32 
Gertrude Diggery, '32 
William Dunham, '32 



MEMBERS 

Lucile Foulger, '32 
Margaret Hines, '32 
Elmer Mitchell, '32 
Louis Tillson, '32 
Randolph Weatherbee, '32 
Ruth Benham. '33 



Rebecca Carter. '33 
John Dobravolsky, '33 
Thelma Kittredge, '33 
Frank Murray, '34 
Millicent Paige, '34 



The purpose of this organization is to promote literary interests of the College 
and to stimulate undergraduate work in letters. 

Meetings this year have taken up the study of the famous legend of Tristram 
and Isolt in the French, German, and English versions as conducted hy Mr. Ber- 
tocci, Dr. Leonard, and Dr. Wright. 

Spofiford Club continued its duties of stimulating, and representing, creative 
writing on the Bates campus throughout the year, 1931-1932. Contributions to 
The Garnet have been made largely by members of the literary clul). 

In order to lessen conflicting club dates and purposes on campus, Spofford voted 
to consolidate its membership with Alethea Club during the second semester. 
The name, Spofiford Club, will be retained, and the membership will be considerably 
enlarged in order that service may be given to more deserving students. 

Carrying out its purpose initiated last year. Spofiford Club this spring will 
bring a speaker, well-known for his literary work, to the campus to give a lecture 
in chapel for the benefit of students and townspeoi)le. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FtFTY-FOUR 




THE 

IVI I r^ r^ v^ he :^m^MM^ 

! i I ; 19 32 -"^i/ ,-. 





PHIL' HELLENIC 



OFFICERS 

President, Rushton Long. '32 

]' ice-president . Mildred Mover, 'H 

Secretary-Treasurer, Norman Douglas, '32 
Chainiuin, Program Conmiittee, Grace Page, '32 

Chairman. Social Committee. Elizabeth Taylor, '32 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

Professor George M. Chase Matthew Frangedakis 



Shirlie Austin, '32 
Gladys Goddard, '32 
CHfton Jacobs, '32 
Mashe Lightman, *32 
Randolph Weatherbee, '32 
Marjorie Arlington, '33 
Donald Bond, '33 
Frances Flynn, '33 
Samuel Gilman, '33 
Russell JeUison, '33 



MEMBERS 

Harry Kemp, '33 
Vincent Kirby, '33 
Henry LaVallee, '33 
Lionel Lemieux, '33 
Eugene McAlister, '33 
Elizabeth McGrath, '33 
Robert Swett, '33 
Isidore Arik, '34 
James Balano, '34 
Nancy Crockett, '34 



Lloyd George, '34 
Josephine Hill, '34 
Clifford Holden, '34 
Maxine Hopkins, '34 
Wyman Lord, '34 
Russell Milnes, '34 
Charlotte Moody, '34 
Sumner Raymond, '34 
Earle Richards, '34 
Pandeleon Frangedakis, 



'35 



The purpose of this club is to promote and stimulate interest in Greek literature 
and life, and also to develop fellowship between the club members and the Greek 
people of the two cities. 

The program this year consisted of several interesting lectures. At one of 
these Professor Bertocci spoke on the "Influence of the Greek Literature and 
Language on the French Drama". Mrs. Frangedakis spoke on "The Customs of 
the Present Day Greek People" ; at another meeting of the organization Professor 
Thomas Mans, head of the Bowdoin Greek department, talked on "The Theory 
and Practice of the Artistic Science of Translation". .A^n informal reception was 
given Professor Chase by the club and the Greek club from the two cities. This 
was in honor of his twenty-fifth anniversary as the Professor of Greek at Bates. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-FIVE 




THE 



MIQI^OI^ 



• t 1932 





DER DEUTSCHE VEREIN 



OFFICERS 



President^ Bkrtha CritchKLL, '32 



Secretary-Treasurer, Euzabeth Seigel, 'i2 



MEMBERS 



Marian Blake, '32 
Violet Blanchard, '32 
Muriel Bliss, '32 
Milan Chapin, '32 
Augusta Cohen, '32 
ReVjecca Cousins, '32 
Bertha Critchell, '32 
Gertrude Diehl, '32 
Gertrude Diggery, '32 
Elden Dustin, '32 
Jeannette Gottesfeld, '32 
Ernest Knox, 'i2 



32 



Margaret MacBride 
Oscar Miller, '32 
Wendell Ray, '32 
Eleanor Robie, '32 
Elizabeth Seigel, ' i2 
Dorothy Sullivan, '32 
Geraldine Wilson, ^i2 
Helen Ashe, '32 
Dagmar Augustinus, '33 
L,uis Bond, 'ii 
Mavis Curtiss, '33 
Phyllis Gilman, '33 



Marjorie Goodbout, 'ii 
Stanley Jackson, 'ii 
Herbert Jensen, ^H 
Robert Kroepsch, ^H 
Elizabeth McGrath, 'ii 
Helen Parker, 'i?) 
Evelyn Rolfe, 'ii 
Eva Sonstroem, ^iZ 
John Stevens, ^ZZ 
Deborah Thompson, ^$Z 
Millicent Paige, '34 
Arnold Ruegg, '34 



MEMBERS EX-OFFICIO 



Dr. and Mrs. A. N. Leonard 



Prof, and Mrs. Samuel Harms 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



Mr. Erich Labouvie 



Miss Inge von Mueller 



The Bates German Club is one of the most active language societies on campus. 
Through a series of well planned meetings, in which the social "good-time" element 
is not slighted, the Verein carries out its purpose to j)romote interest in the life and 
literature of the German people. 

This year the club was especially favored in having two native born Germans 
in its member.ship. Mr. Erich Labouvie, instructor in the German department, 
and Miss Inge von Mueller, an exchange student from Germany and a Bates 
junior, took willing part in many of the meetings, and gave the club members 
intimate, interesting, and first-hand sidelights on real German life. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-SIX 




= ^ ' : 1932 ^ 







DELTA PHI ALPHA 



OFFICERS 



President, EldEn Dustin, '32 



Secretary-Treasurer . Elsie Seigee, '32 



Muriel Bliss, '32 
Augusta Cohen, ^32 
Gertrude Diehl, '32 
Elden Dustin, '32 
Jeannette Gottesfeld, 
Ernest Knox, '32 
Margaret MacBride, 



'32 
'32 



MEMBERS 



Wendell Ray, '32 
Eleanor Robie, '32 
Elsie Seigel, '32 
Leonard Millen, '32 
Dagmar Augustinus, 
Donald Bond, '33 
Mavis Curtiss, '33 



'33 



Phyllis Gilman, '33 
Marjorie Goodbout, '33 
Stanley Jackson, '33 
Herbert Jensen, '33 
Elizabeth McGrath, '33 
Evelyn Rolfe, '33 
Eva Sonstroem, '33 



HONORARY MEMBER 

Dr. Arthur N. Leonard 

The Delta Phi Alpha is the German National Honor Society. Its pur- 
pose is to encourage, reward, and recognize worthwhile achievement in the 
field of German culture. 

Although the society gave the impression this year of being a new campus 
group, it did have an existence at Bates as late as 1929, when it was discon- 
tinued because it was thought that it was in conflict with the Deutscher 
Verein. This year there was a feeling on the part of the German Club mem- 
bers that the Delta Phi Alpha, as a purely honorary society, would be a val- 
uable means of encouraging serious effort in the German classes, and the 
Verein voted to organize the society anew. 

Thus far the Delta Phi Alpha has held only brief business meetings, and 
in no way has conflicted with the Deutscher Verein. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-SEVEN 




THE 
i • ■ ; 1932 ■■ ^ i ^ 





SODALITAS LATINA 



OFFICERS 

President, Gertrude Diehl, '32 

Vice-president, Gladys Goddard, '32 

Secretary-Treasurer, ShirliE Austin, '32 



MEMBERS 



Sliirlie Austin. 'i2 
Vesta Brown, '32 
Gertrude Diehl. "32 



Gladys Goddard, '3. 
Irene Manson, '32 
Annie Proctor, '32 



Mildred Robertson, '32 
Elizabeth Taylor, "32 
Vera Tibbetts, '32 



The purpose of this club is to aid the prospective Latin teacliers by means of 
discussions, reports, and tlie like. This year the club has specialized in aiding the 
prospective teacher of Latin by showing aids in Latin teaching, the conducting of 
Latin clubs, and presenting discussions led by teachers from the surrounding high 
schools. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-EIGHT 




THE 
' ' ! M932 ' " = ' 





MEN'S POLITICS CLUB 

OFFICERS 

President, Norman MacDonald, '32 

J'ice-prcsldciit. Charles Wing, '32 

Secretary-Treasurer, George Burke, '32 



George Burke, '32 
Robert Carter, '32 
John Carroll, '32 
Parker Dexter, '32 
Orimer Bugbee, 'S2 
William Dunham, '32 



MEMBERS 

Norman MacDonald, '32 
Iveonard Millen, '32 
Elmer Mitchell, '32 
Randolph Weatherbee, '32 
Charles Wing, i2 
Bertram Antine, '3i 



Vincent Belleau, 'ii 
Herbert Jensen, 'ii 
John Roche, 'i3 
Donald Smith, '33 



The Men's Politics Club was organized several years ago for the express pur- 
pose of studying public affairs in order to promote an active and intelligent interest 
in present political and economic problems. Its membership is limited to those 
men of the two upper classes who show an interest in the purpose of the organi- 
zation and are majoring in Economics or Government. 

This year the organization was responsible for the bringing of the Governor 
of Maine, William Tudor Gardiner, to the campus at a public meeting in Chase 
Hall where he sj)oke on his code bill for the reorganization of the State Govern- 
ment. Also in the latter part of January the clulj sponsored a model Disarma- 
ment Conference at which members of the club along with delegations made up 
from the Women's Politics Club and the Government classes represented the vari- 
ous nations that were involved in the Conference at Geneva. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-NINE 




MlSHoi^ 

- ■ • - 1932 





THE DISARMAMENT CONFERENCE 

Bates students, in conducting a model Disarmament Conference parallel- 
ing in the essential details the February 1932 Conference at Geneva, mani- 
fested a commendable and desirable world-mindedness that goes far in refu- 
tation of the popular belief that American college students are provincial in 
their interests. 

Members of the Men's Politics Club acted as heads of delegations rep- 
resenting France, England, Japan. Italy, Germany, The Union of Socialist 
Soviet Republics, the Balkan countries, and Poland. The remaining mem- 
bers of each delegation were recruited from students majoring in the politi- 
cal science courses. The procedure and spirit of a genuine world parley 
were carried out throughout the meeting with each delegation earnestly pre- 
senting the viewpoints and sentiments of the particular country it represented 
on the items of the conference agenda. 

The enthusiasm with which not only the members participating but also 
the student body at large and the faculty received the Conference is an indi- 
cation that Bates is interested in World afifairs. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY 




THE 





WOMEN'S POLITICS CLUB 

OFFICERS 

President, JuuA Briggs, '32 

Vice-president. Elsie Seigel, "32 

Secretary-Treasurer, AlthEa Howe, '32 



Julia Briggs, '32 
Violet Blanchard, '32 
Frances Cronin, 'i2 
Constance Curry, '32 
Alice Hellier, 'i2 
Mary Hoag, '32 
Althea Howe, '32 



MEMBERS 

Geraldine Maloon, '32 
Rosemary Lambertson, '32 
Elsie Seigel, 'i2 
Carol Sylvester, '32 
Lucile Jack, '33 
Mildred Moyer, '33 
Beatrice Neilson, '33 



Florence Ogden, '33 
Honorary Member 

Dean Hazel M. Clark 
Faculty Advisor 

Prof. R. R. N. Gould 



The Women's Politics Club, whose membership is composed of the women of 
the upper classes, endeavors to promote an active and intelligent interest in the 
political and economic problems through a study of present day affairs. 

Meetings are held twice a month. At these meetings the various members of 
the club read papers on the present day problems covering the fields of history, 
economics, and politics. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-ONE 




THE 








KAPPA CHAPTER, Phi Sigma Iota 

OFFICERS 

President^ Mr. Robert D. Seward 

Vice-president, Mr. Angei.o P. Bertocci 

Secretary, Muriel MacLeod, '32 

Treasurer, Martin Hubbard, '32 



Blanche T. Gilbert 
Robert D. Seward 
Angelo P. Bertocci 
Elizabeth Best, '32 
Marjorie Briggs, '32 
Bernice Burnham, '32 
Blanche Cassista, '32 
Augusta Cohen, '32 



MEMBERS 

Bertha Critchell, '32 
Gertrude Diggery, '32 
CHnton Dill, '32 
Elden Dustin, '32 
Emily Finn, '32 
Priscilla Goodwin, '32 
Jeannette Gottesfeld, '32 
Martin Hubbard, '32 



Esther Jackson, '32 
Muriel MacLeod, '32 
Rosamond Nichols, '32 
Grace Page, '32 
Dorothy Sullivan, '32 
Mildred Vining, '32 
Walter Wikingstad, '34 
Inge von Mueller, '33 



Phi Sigma Iota has the purpose of encouraging and honoring interest in French, 
Spanish and Italian. Its programs are carefully planned with this objective in 
view. 

The period 1931-1932 was marked by the Great Colonial Exposition in and 
around Paris where enormous sums of money have been spent in the buildings 
which represent, in full size, the great religious and political buildings in all of the 
more important and prosperous colonies of France. Since La Belle France is the 
colonizing power in the world to-day, it seemed quite appropriate that the Kappa 
Chapter should study this year her expansion and also her literary expression of 
this expansion in which field her contributions to world welfare have been innumer- 
able and invaluable. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-TWO 




^ ' ^ ^ 1932 



m 







JORDAN SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY 

OFFICERS 

President, Gilbert Clapperton, '32 

Chairman of Exccutii'e Committee, Albert Bernard, '32 

Secretary-Treasurer, Otis Tibbetts, '32 



Robert Axtell, '32 
Albert Bernard, '32 
George Burke, '32 
Calvin Chamberlain, '32 
Waldo Clapp, '32 
Gilbert Clapperton, '32 
Clinton Dill. '32 
Harold Henckel, '32 



MEMBERS 

Eugene Jekanoski, '32 
Dwight Kimball, '32 
Abe Mandelstam, '32 
George McCarthy, '32 
Louis Rovelli, '32 
Otis Tibbetts, '32 
Franklin Berkover, '33 
Herbert Berry, '33 



Roger Crafts, '33 
Donald Ham, '33 
Lyman Holman, '33 
Walter Merrill, '33 
Joseph Murphy, '33 
Wesley Tiffney, '33 
Edward Wilmot, '33 



The Jordan Scientific Society since its formation in 1910 has had a long and 
progressive period. Its aim is to further the cause of science as it applies in prac- 
tical use and in experimentation. 

Meetings are held twice a month at which there are speeches on various inter- 
esting scientific topics hy the memliers, talks hy faculty memhers and prominent 
men in difi^erent scientific fields, and occasionally moving pictures of industrial or 
technical processes. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-THREE 




THE 



M 11^ 1^01^ 



932 





LAWRANCE CHEMICAL SOCIETY 

OFFICERS 

President, Norman Cole, '32 

Vice-president, Milan Chapin, '2i2 

Secretary-Treasurer, Willis J. FurtwEnglER, '32 



Milan Chapin, '32 
Norman Cole, *S2 
Willis Furtwengler, '32 
Ernest Knox, 'i2 
Oscar Miller, '32 
Harold Norton, '32 
Wendell Ray, '32 



MEMBERS 

Merrill Richardson, 'i2 
James demons, 'ii 
Roland Cronkhite, '33 
Olin McCarthy, 'ii 
Ralph McCIuskey, 'ii 
Gerald Simard, 'Zi 
Albert Walker, '33 



Honorary Members 
Dr. Walter Lawrance 
Dr. Fred Mabee 
Walter Stewart 



This organization strives to stimulate interest in the science of chemistry, both 
applied and theoretical. It is the endeavor of all the members to follow the course 
of chemistry, in so far as possil^le, either as a life work or as an avocation. Aside 
from the technical nature of the oroanization. it is the aim of all the members to 
be united in a band of particular fellowship toward one another as well as remain- 
ing loyal to the ideals of the club. 

At the meetings this year papers have been read on original work or on inter- 
esting developments in some field of chemistry. These have been prepared by the 
members. Several outside speakers have been featured. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-FOUR 




■ '■ - ■■ 1932 ■■ ---•■ 





RAMSDELL SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY 

OFFICERS 

President, Aubigne Gushing, '32 

Vice-president, Florence OgdEn, '35 

Secretary-Treasurer, Rosamond Nichols, '32 



Elizabeth Best '32 
Muriel Bliss, '32 
Augusta Cohen, '32 
Aubigne Gushing, '32 
Priscilla Goodwin, '32 



MEMBERS 

Gwendolyn Maxwell, '32 
Rosamond Nichols, '32 
Christine Stone, '32 
Frances Brackett, '33 
Beatrice Dumais, '33 



Martha Harris, '33 
Rosamond Melcher, '33 
Florence Ogden, '33 
Helen Parker, '33 
Margaret Ranlett, '33 



The Ramsdell Scientific Society, named in honor of Professor George T. Rams- 
dell, is composed of fifteen members from the two upper classes. Each member 
must be recommended by the heads of two science departments or doubly recom- 
mended in one department. 

The bi-monthly meetings are participated in by every member, each one giving 
a scientific fact of general interest with reference to recent discoveries, after which 
all the members join in discussing it. The society also cooperates with Jordan 
Scientific and Lawrance Ghemical as much as possible. 

The program for this year included several visits to industries of scientific 
interest and a caljin party to which the members of Jordan Scientific were invited 
as guests. At the meetings, papers were read and discussed by the members on 
subjects of special interest in the several fields of science as zoology, geology and 
medicine. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-FIVE 




MlSffoi^ 

19 32 ■"• i'-' 





LAMBDA ALPHA 



OFFICERS 

President, Margaret Hines, '32 

Vice-president, Mary O'Neil, '33 

Secretary, Miriam Wheeler, '34 

Treasurer, Betty Mann, '32 



MEMBERS 



Thirlie Additon, '35 
Lynda Bedell, '35 
Mira Briggs, '35 
Kuie Brooks, '35 
Mary Butterfield, '35 
Regina Cantlin, '35 
Stella Clemants, '35 
Elsie Gervais, '35 
Florence Gervais, '35 
Anne Hamilton, '35 
Barbara Eeadbetter, '35 
Doris Linehan. '35 
Barbara Littlefield, '35 
Mildred McCarthy, "35 
Madeline McIIroy, "35 
Charlotte McKenney, '35 
Doris Parent, '35 
Virabelle Poland, '35 
Frances Ray, '35 
Mary Rowe, '35 
Corinne Savage, '35 
Dorothy Stevens, '35 



Lambda Alpha was organized in 1925 for the purjjose of providing its members 
with a study and recreational center on campus and also to bring the town girls 
and the dormitory girls into closer contact. It is the only association at Bates 
College limited to Lewiston and Aulnirn girls. 

The organization had charge of the candy booth at the ^^ W. bazaar. It alsa 
Sponsored a Leap Year Tea Dance. 



Ruth Barren, '32 


Eleanor Libbey. "3 


;, 


Julia Briggs, 'i2 


Florence Merry, '3 


3 


Madaline Bumpus, '32 


Virginia Moulton, 


'33 


Margaret Bumpus, '32 


Helen O'Brien, '33 




Frances Cronin, '32 


Dorothy O'Hara, ' 


33 


Marion Crosby, 'i2 


Mary O'Neil, '33 




Ruth Cunningham, '32 


Edith Pennell, '33 




Gertrude Diehl, '32 


Marcella Shapiro, 


'33 


Emily Finn, '32 


Dorothy Wills, '33 




Jeannette Gottesfeld, '32 


Jeannette Wilson, 


'33 


Margaret Hines, '32 


Dorothy Barton, ',' 


54 


Katherine EaMontagne, '32 


Madeline Bean, '34 


Muriel MacLeod, '32 


Marjorie Bennett, 


'34 


Betty Mann, '32 


Cora Bumpus, "34 




Mildred Robertson, '32 


Verna Geddes, '34 




Eleanor Robie, '32 


Rose Howard, '34 




Frances Stevens, '32 


Florence Larrabee, 


'34 


Vera Tibbetts, '32 


Georgette Lepage. 


'34 


Marjorie Arlington, '33 


Gwendolyn Spear, 


■34 


Charlotte Cutts. '33 


Dorothy Sweeney. 


■34 


Beatrice Dumais, '33 


Miriam Wheeler, 


34 


Phyllis Gilman, '33 


Elizabeth Wilson. 


•34 


Martha Harris, '33 


Beulah Worthley. 


'34 


Margaret Johnson, '33 


Eva 'S'oung. '34 





PAGE ONE HUNDRED StXTY-SIX 




'•^»-^' THE 

"1932 



^.MB 



JOssm 




ALETHEA 

OFFICERS 

President, Elinor Williams, '33 

I'icc-prcsidcut. Dorothy Staples, '33 

Secretary-Treasurer. Virginia AIoulton. '33 

Program Director, HelEn Hamlin, '33 



Mildred Carrier, '3,i 
Dorothy Diggery, '33 
Helen Hamlin, '3i 
Mildred Hollywood, '3. 
Amy Irish, '33 
Florence James. '^^ 
Thelma Kittredge, '.^.^ 
Virginia Moulton, '33 
Betty McGrath. '3i 
Beatrice Nielsen, 'M 
Florence Ogden, '33 
Dawn Orcutt, 'i,^ 



MEMBERS 

Eda Osano, '3i 
Helen O'Brien, '33 
Mary O'NeiJ, '33 
Eva Sonstroem, 'iS 
Dorothy Staples, 'ii 
Dorothy Sweeney, '33 
Dorothy Wills, '33 
Elinor Williams, 'ii 
Theresa Buck, '34 
Ruth Carter, '34 
Celeste Carver, '34 
Nancy Crockett, '34 



Angela D'Errico. '34 
Evelyn Farnham, '34 
Mary Gardiner, '34 
Barbara Lord, '34 
Louise Mallinson. '34 
Doris McAllister, '34 
Marjorie Reid, '34 
Sylvia Shoemaker, '34 
Arlene Skillins, '34 
Eileen Soper, '34 
Miriam Wheeler, '34 



The club aims to provide an opportunity for women of the Sophomore and 
Junior classes who are sincerely interested in literature to meet for reading, study, 
and discussion of the works of American and English writers. 

This year the study included contemporary l{ngli.sh and American drama with 
lectures by the professors in the English department. The meetings are brought 
to a close each year with the annual banquet in May. 



PAGE ONt HUNDRtD SIXTY-SEVEN 




Mim^oi^ 

IQ32 



- ^^- 




^^ ^ itiiilii 


llirlil 


ja 


.Hi 


iiNiii% 


ill. r 


f# 


iHttfl 


^'1 §^ 


AX 


1^ 


ife'^^j^^K^Sk.-^ ^hh^^^^^^H 


w ^^ .** ^ m ' 


If - 
1^ "^ V ^ 




^ »»i -* ^v a«.t i 





OUTING CLUB 



OFFICERS 

ricc-prcsidcnt of Cahiiis and Trails 
I'icc-prcsidcnt of Winter Sports 
J'icc-prcsidciit of Jronicii's .Ithlctics 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Julia liriggs, 'i2 
\ alery Biirati, '.12 
Robert Carter, '32 
Clinton Dill, '32 
Alice Hellier, '32 
Rosemary Lambertson, '32 
Ralph Long, 'i2 
Margaret McBride, 'i2 
Virginia Mills, '32 
Peter Valicenti, '32 
Norman Whitten, '32 
Arnold Adams, '33 



Valkry Ruratt, "32 

Mkkkili. Richardson, '32 

P. MI. Carpkntkr, ",^3 

RosKMARv Lambkrtson, 'M 

Clinton Dill. 'i2 

Coach C. Ray Thompson 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



IJagniar Angiistiiius 
Leo Barry, '33 
Paul Carpenter, '33 
Charlotte Cutts, '33 
Fred Donald, '33 
Benjamin Franklin, 
John Lary, '33 
Eleanor Libbey, '33 
Rosamond Melcher, ' 
Dorothy Penney, '33 
Kenneth Wood, '33 
Verna Brackett, '34 



'33 



33 



Kenneth Campbell, ',i4 
John Cooper, '34 
Edwin Decatur, '34 
Burton Dunfield, '34 
Lloyd George, '34 
Howard Hodgdon, '34 
Ruth Johnson, '34 
Millicent Paige, '34 
William Thornton, '34 
Miriam Wheeler, '34 
Crescentia Zahn, '34 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-EIGHT 




THE ^Ui^ -'^ 



OUTING CLUB 

The Outing Club, known as "the largest and most popular student organization" 
functioned efficiently under its new system this year. Patterned after the organi- 
zation of the Dartmouth Outing Club, a system was established at Bates whereby a 
Junior Body of twelve persons ( seven men and five women) from each of the three 
up])erclasses, out of which a directorate of eight student directors and two faculty 
advisors is chosen, carried out the manifold duties assigned to an organization 
pledged to the encouragement and facilitation of outdoor sports. 

The directors, presided over by a chairman, who is president of the Outing 
Club, have charge of the following portfolios : Winter Sports for Men and 
Women; Cabins and Trails for Men and Women; Hikes and Trips for Men and 
Women ; Carnival for Men and Women ; secretariate ; and treasury. 

The experiment under the new organization revealed several minor flaws which 
through constitutional amendment have been overcome. 

The Outing Club began its program a week before college opened in the fall 
with a four-day trip to Mt. Katahdin for more than a dozen men. This was 
followed by a coeducational afternoon climb up Streaked Mountain, and a climb up 
Mt. Chocorua for the women. Late last spring the Outing Club sponsored a 
deep-sea fishing trip, and another is planned for this spring, augmented by canoe 
trips, and more mountain climbs. In the fall the All-College picnic at Thorncrag 
took place, at which three-quarters of the college was present. 

The Carnival was decidedly increased in scope, covering three full days of 
outdoor events, from the opening burlesque faculty-student baseball game on snow- 
shoes to the final skating and skiing events, hockey game, and Carnival Hop in the 
Alumni Gymnasium. Complete lists of events for men and women were staged, 
and drew the support of large numliers. Although no intercollegiate winter sports 
competition featured the Carnival, the winter sports men gave exhibitions of 
junij)ing and proficiency racing. An innovation, and an exciting one, this year 
was the ski-joring in which six men towed by riders on horseback raced in heats 
across Garcelon Field. 

In the intramural sjjorts the Ofif-Cam])us men defeated John Bertram Hall by 
a single point, while Rand Hall won the pennant for the women. Frye Street 
House, with its realistic sculpture of "Frydo", a dog, won first ])rize in snow 
modelling, with Hacker House, with a Bates seal, second. The Carnival Hop was 
livened and touched with a colorful ceremony in the crowning of Julia Briggs, '32, 
as Queen, with President Gray officiating at the coronal. 

The All-College skate held on the Outing Club's new rink on Garcelon Field 
was also a glamorous affair with colored lights, refreshments, and music. The 
snowshoe baseball game was won by the faculty, 9-8. 

Friends of the college, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Butcher, showed moving pictures 
of Katahdin and W'ashington in Chase Hall, on the opening evening of the 
Carnival. 

The Outing Club expended a great amount of money to erect and maintain its 
new skating rink, but patronage of the rink by faculty and students proved that 
the money was well spent. 

Heavy amounts were also spent for stocking new winter sports equiiMiient, 
repairing old equipment, and for financing the winter sports team with aid from 
the Athletic Association. 

A great deal of repairing was done to both Thorncrag and Sabattus Cabins, 
both of which were used many times during the year. Directors have worked out 
plans for the better conduct of parties at Thorncrag. The Outing Club has also 
accomplished numerous detailed duties, and by the time the year has ended will 
have rounded out a full program of activities. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-NINE 




1Q32 







PAGE ONt IIUNDRtU StVLNTY 







S ATHLEDS 




PAGF ONF HUNDRrn SFVF.NTY-ONE 




TH E 





LESLIE W. SPINKS 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-TWO 




TH E 

" J ^ ^ 19 32 




iBJuiration 




K S L I K S P INKS is a clean, 
fair, hard playing athlete, a 
devotee and student of many sports ; 
he is unassuming in the accomplish- 
ment of his many duties in the Bates 
Athletic Department, and a thorough 
gentleman who moves with cultured 
ease and poise in our society. This 
department of the 1932 Mirror is dedi- 
cated to him as a small evidence of 
the respect and honor with which he 
is esteemed by all who know him. 

"Buck" is the jtuiior member of the 
memorable duo of Morey and Spinks 
that came to the Bates campus three 
years ago to take over coaching duties 
in three sports. The gentleman from 
the South has ably demonstrated his 
worth as freshman and assistant var- 
sity coach in football, as physical in- 
structor and an ardent supporter of 
basketball, and as an all-around indi- 
vidual of varied interests and pursuits. 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED S E VENTY • TH REE 




THE 



>M tj .alUlltk«4AM< 





ATHLETIC COUNCIL 



OFFICERS 



President 
Sccretarx-Trrasurcr 



Jamks II. Carroi,!, 
( Jlivkr K. Cutts 



MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL 

Faculty Mi'iiibcrs Student Memtn-rs 

Prok. O. F. Cutts C. p.. Chamberlain, '32 

Prop. R. R. N. Gould C. C. Dill. '32 

Proi'. 1'. K. PoMLROY R. Iv AIcCluskkv, '?)2 

Prof. G. Iv Ramsdlll A. G. Adams, '.^.^ 

Mr. N. Iv Ross 11. O. r.KRRv, '3.S 

ALUMNI MEMBERS 

Mr. Jamks 11. Carroll 
Dr. \\\ W. Poi.sTKR 
Dr. Ivrnkst V. Call 
Mr. C. R. Thompson 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-FOUR 




TH E 

■ - ^ = IQ32 



1h 



1 



m 



MAi t » i « t t 
I i tit I if t t 




t:- %^ 



%# ^ 



# '^P' I ^j 



VARSITY CLUB 



President, Ray E. McCluski;v. "32 

I'icc-prcsidciit, Ciji'Ton \\'. Jacobs, '32 

Secretary. C. Clinton Dill. '32 

Treasurer. Willis J. FurtwEnglkr, '?)2 

The }>ates Varsity Clul> has increased in size and influence until today it can he 
rated second to none of our campus organizations. Every memher of this select 
i^roui) must first show his (juality hy winning a varsity letter after which he is duly 
initiated into memljership. At the jiresent time the cluh has the largest memher- 
ship of its existence. 

As in the ])ast the cluh took a hig part in welcoming the incoming freshman 
class, hoth as individuals and as a class. The Varsity Cluh reception at Chase Hall 
was especially helpful to the men of '35 in getting them acclimated to the college. 

The cluh was responsihle for the foothall rallies held at llathorn Hall hefore 
each important State Series game. The Cluh also had charge of the Varsity Cluh 
Dance held the night following the l)ack-to-Hates-Xight in which they also assisted. 

As has heen the case in the past the cluh was in no small measure responsihle 
for the success of the annual High School l>askethall Tcjurnament held this year 
in the Lewiston armory. At this Tournament varsity men served as ushers, 
scorers, timers, and team guides, in addition to caring for many of the details that 
arise on such occasions. 

The cluh is at present ])lanning for the entertainment of the school hoy track- 
sters of the State with the ho])e that hecause of an enjoyahle visit to our campus 
thev will look toward l->ates for further education upon graduation from high 
school. 

It is this task of recruiting men for Bates that profits the College most. 
Visitors on our campus are at all times welcomed hy the Cluh and in a large 
measure the high caliher of each year's entering class is due to the efforts of the 
Varsity Cluh. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-FIVE 




"S5*^ 



1' 



I 



DAVID B. MOREY 





LESLIE SPINKS 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-SIX 




THE 





FOOTBALL LEADERS FOR 1931 

Since the custom of having an individual captain was abandoned two 
years ago, the Bates football team has been led by men appointed by Coach 
Morey before each game. The season of 1931 found five seniors receiving 
this honor: Ted Brown, Cal Chamberlain, Ray McCluskey, Pete Valicenti, 
and Ben White. These men started their varsity football careers at Bates 
with Coach Morey's first year as mentor. They have been members of two 
state championship elevens and have all received honors on All-Maine teams. 

Pete Valicenti has held the varsity cpuirterback position during his three 
years as a member of the team. Cal Chamberlain, in fullback position, beat 
Maine almost single-handedly in 1930 by punting a wet and soggy ball safely 
throughout the game, played in a ixjuring rain. Cal is also a Ictterman in 
hockey. 

Besides his football activities, Ted Brown is also a veteran baseball man. 
In the spring of his freshman year, Ted reported for practice, and was given 
the berth of first string catcher. Ben White was awarded a tackle ])osition 
on the All-Maine football team of 1929 and a guard position on a similar 
team of 1931. Ben has also held down a defense position on the varsit}' 
hockey team for three years. 

Ray McCluskey has achieved a most envialile record by his participation 
in three varsitv sports, to])i)ed off by the award of a Phi Beta Kappa key. 
Ray's accomplishments include playing fullback position on the football team 
for three years, a wing ])osition on the hockey sextet for four years, Avith the 
additional hont)r of the captaincy in his senior year, and playing in the out- 
field in baseball for two vears. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SE VENTY - SE VE N 




^ f ^ M932 







PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY - EIGHT 




THE 
19 32 




FOOTBALL 

OFFICERS 

Acting Captains R. E. McCluskkv. 'iZ; B. F. Whitk, '32; P. R. Valicenti, '32; 

T. R. Rkuwn, '32; C. 1'. Cua.mbkrlain, '32 

Manager E. A. Isaacson, '32 

Coacli David 1>. M(»i<i;v. Daktmoutii, '\3 

Assistant Coacli Lkslii': Si'inks, U. ui' Ai.ahama, '27 

THE TEAM 

Left End J. F. Murphy, '33; J. J. Dobravolsky, '33 

Left Tacldc H. U. Bkkry, '33; R. H. Skcor. '34 

/,c/7 (;»(/;■(/ V>. F. Whitk, '32 

Center j. R. Clemons, '33 

A'/Vy/;/ Cuard F. B. Soba. '34; A. W. Mandelstam, '32 

/^;Vy/// Tackle J. C. Hall, '33; A. R. Goruam, '33 

A'/'///!/ Lnd li. J. Jekanoski, '32; F. Italia, '33 

(Ji((irterlHiclc P. R. Valicenti. '32; N. ALvcDonalu, '32 

Left HalflHiek T. R. Brown, '32; W. L. King, '33 

Right LlalflHtck S. W. Farrell, '33; B. N. SprafkE, '32 
LnltlHtck R. E. McCluskey, '32; C. P). Chamberlain, '32 

The V)3\ football season did not see a State Championship come to rest at 
Bates, but it was one that witnessed the largest squad ever to represent the Bobcat 
on the gridiron. The spirit of the team both on the field and off was of the best, 
and ])articularly significant when the Carnet had its back to the wall. The defeat 
at the hands of iMaine only served to bring the team back victorious in the next 
two series games to merit the unreserved respect of the student body for the work 
of the master coach, Dave Morey and his assistant, Leslie Spinks. 

About 50 candidates reported early in September to make bids for the posi- 
tions made vacant ])y the graduation of the class of "31. In the group were 10 
lettermen of previous years, but the contest for every position was a lively one, 
willi four and five men struggling for each. Many new names and faces dotted 
the lincujjs for the various games, ])layers who are destined to carry on in the 
l)uilding of P>ates footI)all history. The events of the season are briefly told in 
the following pages, a story of a team which was strong both in victory and defeat. 

At the close of the season, the Portland Sunday Telegram picked its annual 
All-Maine team. Four Bates men were honored with berths as follows : J. F. 
Murphy, left end; H. ( ). Berry, left tackle; B. F. White, left guard; and J. R. 
Clemons, center. Ben White was also named as a guard on the All-New England 
eleven for small colleges, and as a guard on the 1 larvard Stadium team which was 
picked from Harvard opponents. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-NINE 




1932 




.ui 'ii^ miiffa ■■" 



BATES 2 ARNOLD 

C.tircclon Field, Sei)teml)er 26 — The first f^ame of the 1931 season found 
the Bates Bol)cat gaining- a 2-0 win over Arnold College of Connecticut. A 
steady rain made possible only the most orthodox type of footl)all, and fre- 
quent fumbles, many within striking distance of the goal line, were the result. 
Play was about even during the first period, but the combinaticjn of McClus- 
key, Chamberlain, and Farrell got underwa}' in the sectmd quarter and 
marched repeatedly down the field, only to lose the ball to their opponents 
on niisplays. 

The only scoring play of the game came shortly after the beginning' of the 
second half. McCluskey went through right tackle for 25 yards and a 15-yard 
penalty on Arnold for i)iling up coupled witli a mighty surge by Cham- 
berlain landed the liall on the one-yard line. At this point Arnold stiffened 
and held, finally gaining possession of the ball. After one pvmt had been 
called back because of an off-side play. White broke through, blocked 
Buckley's second kick, and fell on the ball for a safety and the two point 
margin. 

The score does not beg^in to indicate the superiority of the Garnet. Eleven 
first downs were registered by the Moreymen, while the visitors were able to 
gain only 12 yards from scrimmage all afternoon. 

The game marked the initial appearance in Bates' Varsity football togs 
of such men as King, Sprafke, Hall, demons, and Murphy who were destined 
to scintillate during the seas(jn. 



HARVARD 28 BATES 

Harvard Stadium, October 3 — A gallantly fighting Bates footl)all team 
was defeated 28-0 by Harvard in a game which elicited only the most 
favorable praise for the Morey-coached gridders. Six times throughout the 
afternoon the mighty forces of Harvard were halted within the 10-yard line, 
and forced to relinquish the ball on downs to their smaller foe. On two of 
these occasions, the forward line of the Crimson was able to break through 
and block punts which were converted into touchdowns. Mays, fleet Harvard 
halfback, scored the only touchdown resulting from straight football when he 
went over from the nine-yard line early in the second ])eriod. In the fourth 
period, Wells, Harvard's second string (piarterback, threw a flat pass into 
the end zone which grazed demon's fingers, but was finalK- l)rought to earth 
by Crickard for the final score. 

The nearest Bates came to scoring was in the second period when Har- 
vard's Ca]:)tain Barry Wood, later of All-American fame, dropped back to 
throw a ])ass. He was smothered by four Bates men, and out of the jumble 
raced Dobravolsky with the ball under his arm. After he had reached the 
goal line, however, the referee called the play dead, ruling' that the ball had 
touched the ground. 

The Bates line, with only two substitutions, played sterling football. Ben 
White was claimed by many to be the outstanding player on the field. 
Wilmot's fine work as a defensive fullback, and King's 28-vard jaunt in the 
last c|uarter were the highlights of the Garnet backfield. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY 




THE '*~ '''3^WII|llli ^^ ' M 
- V: 19 32 "^^^i-^ ^.-..JLiltiffli 



BATES 34 NORWICH 

Sabine Field, Northrteld, Vt., ( Jctcjber 10 — In an exhibition of great 
offensive strength, the Bobcat had little difficulty in subduing the cadets of 
Norwich University by a score of 34-0. Deprived of at least two scores in 
the first ])eriod through off-side penalties, the (larnet machine clicked early 
in the second quarter when Ray McCluskey went over the last stripe from the 
five-yard line after a 15-yard advance by Farrell. A few minutes after Vali- 
centi had kicked the goal, the ball had been worked up into scoring position 
again through the efforts of King, Fireman, and McCluskey. A pass from 
X'alicenti to P'ireman was good for 10 yards, and on the next play Fireman 
secured the second touchdDwn. Ray McCluskey crashed the center of the line 
for the extra pcnnt. 

'Pile second half was a repetition of the first, with the cadets unable to 
gain through the Bates line. Ray McCluskey added his second touchdown 
of the day, and Mac Donald kicked the point shcjrtly after the beginning of the 
third period. Norwich flashed its only offensive threat of the game in this 
quarter when two forward passes in succession netted as many first downs. 

X'alicenti hurled a 15-yard pass to Sprafke early in the last quarter, and 
the latter raced 45 yards more for another touchdown. The fifth and final 
score of the game came in the closing minutes of play when Ralph McCluskey 
threw a pass from midfield to Fireman, who scampered the remaining dis- 
tance to the goal line untouched. 



BATES 3 RHODE ISLAND 

Garcelon Field, October 17 — The third victory of the season came at the 
expense of the highly-touted Rhode Island State aggregation only after the 
hardest kind of a battle. Late in the last cpiarter, after three attempts to 
make the necessary distance from the 13-yard line had failed, Pete X'alicenti 
dropped back to the 20-yard marker and booted the pigskin squarely through 
the uprights for the three point margin. 

The game was a see-saw affair throughout the first three periods. (loing 
into the last stretch, however, the Bobcat began to find itself and exhibited 
the only sustained march of the afternoon. Starting on their opponent's 
40-yard line, a pass, \'alicenti to Farrell, was good for 12 yards. A 15-yard 
penalty on Rhode Island and an off-tackle thrust by Ted Brown put the ball 
on the 13-yard line where three plays later, X'alicenti registered his field-goal. 

Goff, high-scoring fullback for the down state team, was effectivly 
stopped on all his attempts at ball-carrying. His running mate, Cragan, 
proved to be an elusive and tricky threat at all times. Ted Brown was the 
big gun in the Carnet offense, being the only player on the field who was 
able to gain ground consistently on the slippery turf. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-ONE 





IQ32 

THE STATE SERIES 

MAINE 9 BATES 6 

Garcelon Field, October 24 — In a game replete with sparkling plays, and 
against a smooth-functioning Pale Blue outfit, the P)ates eleven lost its first 
State Series encounter in two years to the cliani])i(inship University of Maine 
team. A touchdown with the extra point and a safety against a single tally 
for the Bobcat spelled the defeat. 

The first period was all Maine, a dazzling ofi'ense l)eing offset in part by a 
magnificent goal-line stand as the visitors were repulsed four times when as many 
yards were needed for a score. After a punting duel had taken part of the time 
in the second quarter. Favor, Maine's chunkv halfback. I)rt)ke loose at midfield and 
ended his run over the line for the first touchdown of the game. Wilson place- 
kicked the extra point to give the Blue a 7-0 lead. 

With the entrance of King and Sprafke into the fray, the Bol)cat began to 
pick up. Valicenti threw a pass to Sprafke which was good for 25 yards. 
Sprafke on the next play made 13 more around end. and King duplicated this with 
a 12-yard advance around the opposite side. With Sprafke adding three more 
yards and King seven, the ball was now within striking distance of the goal with 
first down for Bates. Two plays later. Valicenti dropped back, threw a pass to 
King in the extreme corner of the field and the Garnet had scored. The try for 
the point failed. 

The second half opened with Farrell and Brown making several good gains, 
but neither team was able to penetrate very far into the others' territory. Bates 
advanced the ball to Maine's 21 -yard line and then lost it on downs. Maine con- 
tinued to hold the edge in punting which factor ke])t them out of danger on many 
occasions. 

McCarthy opened the fourth quarter with a 10-yard advance to send new hojie 
to the Bates followers. The ball changed hands rapidly, and ^Maine's final bit of 
scoring came after a freak punt had landed on the three-yard line and refused to 
roll over. Valicenti tried a pass from behind his own goal which Kizonack 
knocked down and fell on for two more points. Bates resorted to forwards in the 
few remaining minutes and after completing two, a third was intercei)ted as the 
final whi.stle blew. 

Although Maine gained more yardage from scrimmage, ISates scored three 
more first downs than its o])])()nent. 

BATES 30 BOWDOIN 

Whittier Field, Brunswick, ( )ctober 31. — Coach Morey used M members of his 
squad in tacking a five-touchdown defeat on a weak Bowdoin team. lv\cei)t for 
the first period, the Polar Bear did not threaten in any dejiartment as iiates i)ile(] 
17 first downs to the losers' seven. 

King scored his first of three touchdowns on the first play of the second (|uarter. 
Slanting otif-tackle from his own 35-yard line, the blond flash twisted and weaved 
his way through the Bowdoin secondary defense and then outraced the safety man 
to complete his 65-yard run unmolested. The Garnet rang up two more scores 
before the half ended as Sprafke bucked through the line for six yards for bis 
contril)ution. and a punt from Picker's toe was blocked by White and v'^oba. with 
the latter falling on it to make the score read 18-0. 

The third ])eriod found the P)obcat still gaining almost at will and the culmina- 
tion of a 65-yard drive came with King's second touchdown after a five-yard run. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED ErGHTY-TWO 




i H L mM"' M 

1 9 32 ,_.^..^JI iiifliiM 



And again in the last quarter. King showed his elusiveness and speed by a 
35-yard run around right end for the last score of the afternoon. All five attempts 
at securing the extra point went astray. 

Bowdoin's light line fought a losing battle throughout the game. Bilodeau at 
guard made half the tackles for his team and eventually played himself out. 
Milliken at center and Captain Ricker at halfback were two other luminaries, 
the line inmting of the latter being one of the features of the slaughter. 

The Bates ends, Mur])hv and Jekanoski, nailed the opposing ball-carriers for 
los.ses consistently, 'i'he whole line remained impenetral)le to all advances through 
it. While King's three counters made him outstanding, the rest of the liackfield 
deserved its share of the glf)ry in the field day. 



BATES 7 COLBY 6 

Seaverns ImcM, Waterville. November 11. — Second place in the State Series 
went to the (larnet on Armistice Day after a bitter struggle with the Colby Mule 
in which the latter lost out by a score of 7-6. 

Johnstone ran the oj)eiiing kickoff back for 10 yards, and from that point on it 
was either team's game until the final whistle ceased hostilities. The first period 
found the Mules opening up with a rush with Foley leading the attack. Toomey 
at left end for Bates made a series of spectacular tackles which aided materially 
in slowing u)i the opposing drive. Both stands found plenty to cheer about as 
Thomas and McCluskey each made advances of 15 yards. 

After an exchange of punts in the second quarter, the fireworks began as all 
the scoring of the game was completed in this period. King started things ofif 
with a .seven-yard gain, and after one incompleted pass, he took the ball for 18 
yards more. Jekano.ski received a jiass from Valicenti 12 yards farther down 
the field, and McCluskev crashed the center of the Colby line for another first down 
to put the liall on the 10-yard line. King scored from this ]>oint easily on a wide 
end run and Valicenti dro])-kicked the seventh jioint. 

On the ensuing kickotf, however, Johnstone received the ball on his own 20-yard 
line, fumbled it, and then danced up the sidelines through the melee to emerge in 
the open with three Bates men at his heels. King began to close up the distance, 
and finally overhauled the Colbv captain and brought him down on the three-yard 
line. But the Mule was not to be denied as on the next play Peabody took the ball 
over. Crabtree's place-kick was wild and the .score stood 7-6. 

The third period was less interesting as the two elevens punted often. Peabody 
got away for 12 yards, but was halted by demons. Brown and Farrell made 
gains of seven and nine yards as the period ended. Colbv tried desperatelv to 
score via the air in the closing minutes, but the alert play of Clemons and the rest 
of the Bates secondary defense succeeded in knocking the passes down. 

Valicenti's toe again lirought a victory- to Bates by the same score and in the 
same manner as he did in the Colby game of two years ago. 





Final Standing of State 


Series 












Opp'ts 






Won 


Lost 


Points 


Points 


Pet. 


Maine 


3 





48 


13 


1.000 


Bates 


2 


1 


43 


15 


.667 


Colby 


1 


2 


45 


32 


.333 


Bowdoi 


n 


3 


6 


82 


.000 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-THREE 




THE 



MII^I^OI^ 



ami.iffe>..^«>. 





FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 

Under the guidance of Coacli v'^pinks, the l>ates Ij()l)kitteiis experienced a suc- 
cessful season with their five-game schedule, winning three games, tying (jne, and 
losing only to Bridgton Acafleniy in their first appearance. The spirit of the 
freshman squad was exceptionally fine, ahout 50 men reporting daily for practice. 

The Frosh were defeated 6-0 in their first game hy Bridgton. The field was 
slippery, and a continual downpour made playing conditions the very worst. 
Forty-nine players saw .service for the yearlings in the game which was featured 
from the Oarnet viewi)oint hy the punting of Pricher and the line play of Stone 
and I'ond. The fir,st victory came on October 23, when I\L C. L was defeated 13-0. 
Pricher scored the first touchdown on a 35-yard run. and Stone place-kicked the 
extra point. In the final period. Lynch intercepted a lateral pass and romped 
60 yards for the last score. K. AI. C. S. went down to defeat at the hands of 
the Frosh by a score of 6-0 on October 30. Although the freshmen threatened 
continually, they were able to jjush over but one tally, that by Pricher in the second 
period. The next game on !\'o\ember 6 found a strong Coburn Classical team 
holding the Frosh .scoreless until the final period. After a series of line bucks, 
Lenzi finally i)loughed over the line, to be followed a few minutes later by Pricher. 
Stone kicked both extra points. Coburn scored in the last minute of play, after 
a series of passes. In the last game of the season, a scoreless tie was played with 
the powerful Kents Hill team, which was crowned state preparatory school cham- 
pions. Twice the freshmen held within the 10-yard line, although their (jwn 
attempts to score did not take them beyond the 25-yard marker. The Frosh 
backfield, and Stone and Gilman in the line were outstanding. Another tra- 
dition was exploded when j)lans for the annual Frosh-Soph game fell through. 

The following plavers received 1935 numerals: F. Aldrich, R. J. Anicetti, 
S. T. Fuller, W. M. Gay, A. Gilman, D. B. Hill. R. ]. Kramer. L. F. Lenzi. M. L. 
Lindholm, R. Lynch. G. V. Mendall. H. P. Pond. W. S. Pricher, N. G. Rainville. 
I. B. Rohin, W. H. Stone, D. V. Tavlor, V. Valicenti and \V. G. Zook. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-FOUR 




MlSHoi^ 







CROSS COUNTRY 



OFFICERS 

Captain. Norman E. Whittkx. 'il 

Mamujcr. Norman I. Douclas, '32 

Coach, C. Ray Thompson, '13 

THE TEAM 

*N. E. Whitten, '32 
*R. E. Jeluson, 'iZ P. N. Carpenter, '33 

A. G. Adams, '2>i W. J. Furtwengler, "32 

H. N. Cole. '?>2 E. C. Allison, '32 

* Lcttcrmcn 

The 1931 varsity cross country squad experienced a mediocre season as far as 
team victories were concerned. The departure of such men as Viles, Jones, Hobl'S, 
Hayes, and Chapman, veterans with three years experience, left only Captain 
Norman Whitten and Furtwengler for lettermen in the hill and dale sport. One 
victory and two defeats in dual meets, and fifth place in the New Englands is a 
brief summary of the season. The outstanding feature of every race was the 
running of Captain Whitten and. Russell Jellison who finished either in a tie for 
first or in first and second place in all four races. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-FIVE 





THE SPRINGFIELD MEET 

The first race of the season, run for the most part over surfaced roads, found 
a I)etter halanced Sprinj^field outfit lea(Hn<^ Bates I)y a score of 2C)-2'). W'hitten 
and jelHson stayed hack (hunui^ the greater part of the race in an attempt to keep 
the Garnet pack together; but seeing their opponents going too far in the lead, the 
two midget runners opened up to gain a respectalile advantage which they held to 
the finish. .Arnold Adams, the third Bates man to finish, ran a fine race over the 
long grind. The hunching of four S])ringfield men, who finished I)ehind W'hitten 
and Jellison, decided the outcome. 

Summary 

Tie for first: Tie fur liftli : 9. Furtuengler, Bates 

Whitten, Jellison. Bates Olnistead. .\ii<Ierson. Spring- |''- Ca,','"'"''"/' ^""^r^ , 

fjglfl 11. I ililen, Springfield 

3. Brown, Springfield - , , r, !-• Cole, Bates 
, „., , c- ■ ^ , , '■ Adams. Bates 

4. Gibbs, ijpnngheld g V)i>s\,t. SprinKfield Time, 28:56 

THE STATE MEET 

Bates' hopes of winning the state cross country chamjiionship for the third 
consecutive year were doomed when the final .score of the meet with Maine was 
added up to give the Pale Blue harriers a slim 27-30 victory. In one of the most 
thrilling finishes ever witnessed on the local course. Captain W'hitten and jellison 
fought otT the drive of Captain Booth of the visitors for the last 200 3ards and 
scored the first two places for Bates. The record of 27 minutes and three seconds 
for the five-mile course, set by the great Maine duo, Richardson and Lindsay, 
was broken by 21 seconds. 

Maine's power and balance were shown in the ])lacing of .seven out of the next 
eight men to finish behind W bitten and Jellison. Adams staged a great sprint over 
the last quarter-mile to land si.xth place ahead of Osgood of Maine. 

Summary 

1. Wliitten, Bates 1"'<= f"'' f'U'rtli : X. Sliaw. .Maine 

.'. lellis.ni. Bates Gunning, Earle, Maine 9- A'>?tin, Maine 

10. Allison, Bates 

3. Booth, Maine 6. Adams, Bates 11. Inirfwengler. Bates 

7. Osgood, MaiiK 12. Carpenter, Hates 

A PERFECT SCORE 

The one bright spot of the cross country .season came on October .^1 when eight 
Bates runners finished hand in hand to score a i)erfect win over the harriers from 
Northeastern. Handicapped by the loss of Oreenleaf, ca]>tain and individual star, 
the visitors were hopelessly outclassed after the first mile had been covered. The 
victory marked the second clean sweep in successive years over the Northeastern 
pack. 

Summary 

Tie for first: </. Mdrang, Northeastern 12. I^awrence, Nortlieastern 

Wliitten, Jellison, Carpenter, '"• Kodhain, .Xcjrtheastern l.i. Weaver. Northeastern 

Adams, Fnrtwengler. Cole, "• Allison, liates 14. Jtradforil, .Xorthcastern 
Kayniond, lUitlcr, Bates 

THE NEW ENGLANDS 

Although fifth place was the best the liates cross country team could score as a 
unit, individual honors went to the garnet-clad aces, Norman Whitten and Russell 
Jellison, who finished in first and second places respectively in the annual New 
England Intercollegiate Cross Countrv race at Franklin iMeld in Boston, Novem- 
ber 16. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-SIX 






THE 

■ ■ " 1932 



Tjlsim 




FRESHMAN CROSS COUNTRY 

Coach 'Ph()m])s<)n. following a ])recedent established last year, divided his first 
year hill and dale squad into two groups and the teams participated in 10 races 
during the 1931 season. 

Team A met and defeated four opponents representing high schools throughout 
the state, losing only to the strong Gorham Normal outfit which later gained the 
title of champions of Maine. Prominent in the yearling victories were Olds, Win- 
ston, Malloy, and Hoston, runners who should bolster the varsity squad consider- 
ably next fall. 

Team B won two and lost three of their encounters, liut met some worthy 
competition. 

For the first time in recent years. Bates was not represented by a freshman team 
in the annual New England race. The following men were awarded 1935 numer- 
als : J. C. Boston, C. F. Candee, P. A. Chapman, D. W. Malloy, H. B\ Norman, 
G. E. Olds and E. C. Winston. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-SEVEN 




Mimloc^ 

1932 





PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-EIGHT 




XH E 

■ ■ ' 1932 




HOCKEY 



OFFICERS 

Captain, Ray E. IMcCluskky, 'il 

Manager, Vincent Bei^leau, 'i2i 

Coach, Charles Gelly 

THE TEAM 

Kiilht Win;/ R. K. McCluskey, 'M; K. 11. McCluskey, '33 

Left Win;/ R. W. Secor. '35; K. B. White, '35 

Center J. F. Murphy, '33; R. B. Swett. '33 

Right Defense H. O. Berry, '33 

Left Defense B. F. White, '32 

Coal F. D. Flynn, '33 

With Coach Celly at the reins for the second year, the liates hockey squad 
reported for action after the Christmas recess with four lettermen present. The 
problems of choosin^t;- two forward lines, a defense man to team up with Ben White, 
and a goal tender were soon worked out as the initial game was played after only 
three practice .sessions. 

Captain Ray AlcCluskey, Dick Secor, and Joe Murphy started every game in 
the forward line and were flanked hy Ben White. Herb Berry and Frank Soba 
in the defense positions. Francis Flynn capably filled the goal for the first half of 
the season, and thereafter alternated with Heldman of the freshman squad. Ralph 
McCluskey, Bob Swett, Jack Rugg. and Ken White formed the second forward 
line, with White playing enough j)eriods after mid-years to earn a letter, the first 
freshman award in hockey for some years. 

Although the state championship was lost to Colby, the Bates sextet had a fairly 
successful season, winning seven of 13 games and tying one. At the end of 
the 1932 season, Joe Murphy was elected captain for the following year, and will 
return with six other lettermen. 

The season opened January 7 with the Garnet defeating the Portland Athletic 
Club 3-2. John Cogan, ex-Bates captain, starred for the losers, while Captain 
Ray McCluskey's two goals in the final period and the stick work of Murphy 
featured the Bates attack. Two days later Bates and Colby ojjened up the state 
series with a 1-1 tie. Ben White scored on a long shot in the last period and 
neither team was able to push over the deciding counter in the overtime period. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-NINE 





Mimloi^ 

1932 



Piovvdoin went down to defeat by a 3-1 score on January 11. witJT Haskell's 
l)]ay in the Bowdoin goal keeping the score down. Tlie (larnet was superior in 
every department. Ben \\'hite. Swett. and Soba did tlie scoring, one in each of 
the three jjeriods. 

Defeats by Iirown and I'oston University were the results of the only trip of 
the season. The play of Secor dominated the Iiates jjlay in the latter game. 

Poor ice at the St. Dom.s arena turned the scheduled Bates-Bowdoin game into 
an exhibition afifair. The (^arnet emerged as victor, although the result did not 
count in series games. The last game Ijefore mid-years with Mass. Aggies was 
cancelled. 

Returning after a ten-day battle with the books, the Gelly-coached crew 
journeyed to Durham and defeated Xew Hampshire State 2-1. Poor ice slowed 
the game down, and it was ncjt until the last ])eriod that either goal was dented. 
Hanley scored first for Xew Hamjishire. but Secor followed with two goals in 
rapid succession to clinch the win. 

Hopes for another champion>hi]j were dimmed when Colbv eked out a 4-3 win 
on February 6. Ben White and McCluskey scorerl in the first period and Secor 
in the last to tie the count. In the second overtime period Wilson, Colby captain, 
sunk the final goal. On February 12. Bates was defeated 3-1 by a St. Doms team 
led by Coach Gelly in a game played for charity. 

An aggressive and smart Colby team administered a 4-0 defeat (jn February 15 
which clinched the championship for the Waterville collegians. Violette, former 
Bates man, ])layed a faultless game in the Colby net to turn aside all scoring 
threats. 

The la.st three games of the season were successive wins for the Oarnet. Bow- 
doin was defeated 6-5 in a free scoring game in which many ])enalties were 
inflicted. Xew Hampshire met its second defeat at the hands of I-!ates Ijv a 4-3 
score with the freshman Heldman i)erforming creditabh- in the goal. The final 
game was a 2-1 win over Pxiwdoin. with another Hates frohman, N'eaton. tallving 
the final goal of the season. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY 




THE 



MIPI^OI^ 



932 



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FRESHMAN HOCKEY 

The class of 1935 1)oasted several fine hockey players, and, in the two scheduled 
games for the first year men, two victories were chalkefl up. 

The first i^ame. played with Kents Hill, was a fast and rui^ged encounter, with 
the freshmen emerginj^' on the long end of a })-l score. Ken White, later to see 
much varsity service, scored one of the counters, and Russ Lynch accounted for 
the other two. 

The second game with Hridgton Academy resulted in a one-sided 8-2 victory 
for the Garnet yearlings. The forward line of Lynch, White, and \'eaton flashed 
consistently. Yeaton personally accounted for four scores. Before the close of 
the varsity schedule. White, Heldman, Y'eaton and Lynch played in major games. 

Numerals were awarded to the following : 

A. Oilman, N. L Greig, C. L. Heldman, D. H. Hill, R. J. Lynch, G. N. ^lendall. 
H. F. Norman, W. H. Stone, K. B. White, D. E. Yeaton, "w.H. Zook. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINFTY-ONE 




WINTER SPORTS 



OFFICERS 

Capiains, ValKry Huratj, '32 and Norman Whittkn, 'i2 

Manager. Paul Carpknter, 'ii 

Coach. C. Ray Thompson, '13 



THE TEAM 



Kornuui Whitteii, 'M 
\'alcrv ilnr.'iti. '.^i 



Paul Carpenter. '3.^ 
Kiihert Jcilinson, ',!,! 



J.ihn Curtis, '.f.i 
Keiiiietli Cain]jliell, 



'IMu- (larnet winter s))orts team made a ^uod showing in tlie State meet 
against the University of Maine. Bates' tiny squad of three veterans and 
three recruits finished the meet on the small end of a 38 to 28 score. 

In the vState Meet I'aul Carpenter, skier, was the high point man with 13 
l)oints, two firsts and a second, to his credit. He won first place in the 300- 
yard downhill race in 16 seconds. Curtis of Hates was second, Davis of 
Maine, third, and Burati of Bates fourth, all a si)lit second behind each other. 
Car])enter also won the slalom, done on difficult, wet, heavy snow, due to the 
warm weather and rain, lie completed the twisted course in 12.6 seconds. 

The five-mile ski race was a killer lying through slush and water. Green 
of Maine beat Carpenter by a little more than a minute, Davis of Maine and 
Elliott of Maine finished third and fourth. The time for the race was 34 
minutes 3 seconds. 

Ashworth, showing good form, took first in the ski jump for Maine; Curtis 
of Bates was second; I)avis of Maine, and Burati of Bates fourth. Curtis 
did the longest standing jump tjf the day at 40 feet. 

Norman Whitten maintained his sui)eriority in the twcj-inile snow-shoe 
race, defeating Robbins of Maine over a shortened course in eight minutes. 
31 seconds. Clayton TTardison of Maine and Ashton of Maine were third 
and fourth. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY TWO 











Captain, C. W. Jacobs, '32 



TENNIS 

OFFICERS 

Manager, M. U. L. Lightman, '32 

Coach. Ohorgk Tut^ts 



THE TEAM 



C. W. Jacobs, '32 

K. L. Carter, '?)2 

M. U. L. Lightman, '32 

B. J. Antine, '33 



K. N. Wood, '33 
K. I. Wood, '33 
M. L. Stevens, '34 
H. M. Ti'RNER, '34 



SCHEDULE FOR 1932 

May 2 ColI)y at Lewiston 

May 7 University of Maine at Orcjno 

May 10 Bowdoin at Brunswick 

May 13 Tufts at Medford 

May 14 Boston University at Boston 

May 16, 17, 18 New En<^land Lawn Tennis Association Matches at The 

Longwood Cricket Club in Boston 

May 23, 24 State Meet at Lewiston 

Aided h\- practice sessions held on the new indcxM- ccjurt during the winter 
months, tlie tennis squad, with four letternien as a nucleus, is exi)ected to 
make a strong hid for state honors this spring. 

Clifton Jacobs, '32, a letterman in tennis since his freshman year and ca])- 
tain of the varsity team for three years, will be defending his state singles 
title on the Bates courts May 24. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY THREE 




THE 

IQ32 





PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-FOUR 




THE 

19 32 



MM 



- OiiMI 



TRACK 



OFFICERS 

Captain. Norman E. Wmittkn. '32 

Manager. Waldo A. Clapp, '32 

Coach. C. Ray Thompson, '13 



TEAM 



H. N. Cole. '32 

C. C. Dill, -il 

N. I. Douglas, 'i2 

E. \V. Knox, '32 

C. E. Sampson, ^i2 
N. E. Whitten, '^2 

D. S. Williams, 'i2 



A. G. Adams, '33 

R E. Burch, '33 

A. R. Gorhani, 'ii 

C. H. Hall, '3i 

R. E. Jellison, '33 

J. S. Lary, 'ii 

H. W. Jensen, 'ii 



J. B. Eaton, '34 
S L- Raymond, '34 
D. R. Smith, '34 
R. J. Anicetti, '35 
R. A. Bangs, '35 
R. J. Kramer, '35 
D. W. Malloy, '35 



Now that the indoor season is a matter of history for 1932. Coach Thomp- 
son is just beginnint^' to hold workouts on (larcelon Field as the Mirror goes 
to press. The schedule for the spring calls for a dual meet with New Hamp- 
shire, the state meet here in Lewiston, the New Englands at Brown Univer- 
sity, and the 1. C. A. A. A. A. meet at the University of California. 

Representatives of the Varsity squad j^articipated in four meets away 
during the winter, besides the annual meet with Maine. The features of 
the season were Arnold Adams' victory in the Prout Memorial 600 race at 
the K. of C. games, and the two-mile relay win at the B. A. A. races in 
Boston. 

Coach Thompson has received many set-backs since the first of the year, 
as first one promising runner and then another has been forced to abandon 
the sport because of injuries. It is not expected that the coach will be able 
to present the lull strength of his squad at any meet this year. 

Arnold Adams and Russell Jellison have been outstanding in track activi- 
ties up to date. Last spring Bates placed fourth in the New Englands. with 
Adams' record breaking time of 48.2 in the 440 placing him in a class with the 
leading quarter-milers in the country. 

Jellison repeated his victory in the five-mile road race at Portland on 
Patriots Day. breaking his previous record by a full minute. Malloy of the 
freshman squad finished third in the same race. 

NEW YORK K. OF C. GAMES 

New York City, February 27. Adams and Jellison wound up the track 
activities in outside meets by accepting the invitations of the officials to com- 
pete in the New York K. of C. races. Adams entered a special Casey 600- 
yard run. Although losing to McCafiferty of Holy Cross by 4/5 of a second. 
Adams pushed the latter to a time of 1.12 2/5, the fastest for that distance 
anywhere last winter. Jellison competed in a handicap 1000. and took a 
second place. Kelly of Georgetown won the race in 2.14 3/5. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-FIVE 




THE 

19 32 ^^ ^ ' 




THE B. A. A. GAMES 

Boston, l^V'hniary \}\. Bates' victories in the two-mile relay at the B. A. 
A.'s were run to three strai,i^ht as a quartet composed of Norman Cole, Rus- 
sell jellison, John Lary, and Arnold Adams, led a held of teams from seven 
other coliei^es to the ta])e in the time of 7.56 2/5. Boston Colle<^'e was second 
and Howdoin third. The performance c^f the team surpassed even the fond- 
est hopes ot Coach Thompson. Jellison ran his half-mile in 1.56 2/5, and 
Adams, running;- in anchor j)osition, came within 1/5 of a second of dupli- 
cating;- the time. Adams took the baton with a handicap of 20 yards to make 
u]), but running- a steadv and well-jud,yed race, the (larnet ace i)assed the 
B. C. man on the last lap to win with 15 yards to si)are. 

A freshman mile relay team, Ih-icher, Pendleton, Nunnally, and Tierney, 
running' in that order, was second only to a yearling team from Villanova 
for the best time of the meet. The frosh showed great promise in hanging 
up the time of 3.36 3/5. 

(Jther Bates' entries included Billy Knox, who won his cjualifying heat 
in the 40-yd. dasli only to stumble at the start of the semi-finals, and Clayton 
Hall who finished third in a trial heat of the 600, just failing to qualify. 



UNIVERSITY CLUB MEET 

Boston, February 20. The four Maine colleges took practically all the 
honors and points at the indoor New Englands sponsored by the University 
Club of Boston. Bowdoin won the meet with 43 1/2 points. Maine was 
second with 35, Bates third with 27, and Colby fourth with 22. Norman 
Whitten won the two-mile run, and Raymond, '34, was fifth. In the 1000- 
yard run, Jellison, Cole, and Smith took first, third, and fifth places respec- 
tively. Jack Eaton scored a fifth place in the hurdles, Billy Knox was second 
in the 40-yd. dash and fifth in the broad jumj), and Sampson was third in the 
broad jump. 

The final score for Bates was contributed by a mile relay team of Samp- 
son, Larv, Hall, and Adams. This (|uartet won its dual race and placed 
third in best times for the meet. Hall fell in his leg of the race and lost 
alnjut five seconds, handing the stick to Adams 25 yards behind. Starting 
out with this seemingly impossible handicap, Adams slowly closed up the 
distance, and again with his famous spurt took the lead to win by 10 yards. 
He was given a tremendous ovation as his time for the quarter was an- 
nounced as 49 seconds flat. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-SIX 




THE 






THE BATES-MAINE DUAL MEET 

Lc'wiston. March 5. 'Vhf annual indoor meet with the University of 
Maine was a re])etiti()n of tlic duals of the last two years as the visitors scored 
all points but one in the three weight events to win liy a score of 62-55. 

The Garnet runners showed a marked superiority on the track, taking a 
first place in everv event with the exception of the 40-yard dash. Adams, 
a double winner in the 300 and 600-vd. events, and Jellison, wdio won the 
mile and ])laced second to Whitten in the two-mile, sacrificed chances for 
individual records in order to add points to the team score. Bates made a 
clean sweep in the 600-yd. run and the hurdles, with Maine scoring all the 
points in the ,^5-11). weight event, the discus, and the pole-vault. 

One new record was established when Webl) of Maine, on his last try, 
cleared the high-jump bar at 5 ft. 11 'j inches. Fickett of the visitors was 
the individual star of the meet with firsts in the discus and the ,^5-lb. weight, 
and a second in the shot put for a total of 1.3 points. 

SUMMARY 

40-yard dash. Won by Means (M) ; second, Ivnox (B) ; third. Chase (M). 
Time, 4 4/5 seconds. 

300-yard dash. Won b\' Adams (B); second, Moulton (M); third, Knox 
(B). Time, ?:?> 3/5 second,s. 

600-yar(l run. Won by Adams (B); second. I.ary (B); third. Hall (B). 
Time, 1 :17 2/5 seconds. 

1000-yard run. Won In' Cole (B); second, Shaw (M); third. Smith (B). 
Time, 2.25 seconds. 

1-mile run. Won by Jellison (B); second, Booth (M); third, Raymond 
(B). Time, 4:34 seconds. 

2-mile run. Won by Whitten (B); second. Jellison ( B> ) ; third. Pxtnth 
(M). Time, 9:57 seconds. 

45-yard high hurdles. Won by Burch (B); second, Williams (B); third, 
Eaton (B). Time, 6 2/5 seconds. 

Pole vault. Triple tie for first among Webb. lla\ey, and P)urnham, all 
of Maine. Height, 11 ft. 6 inches. 

Broad jump. Won by Knox (B); second. Chase (M); third, Sampson 
(B). Distance, 21 ft. 5>^ inches. 

High jump. Tie between Webb and Burnham (M); third. Kramer (B). 
Height, 5 ft. 8 inches. (W'ebb set new gym record at 5 ft. llVj inches.) 

16-pound shot. Won l)y Alley (M) ; second, Fickett (M) ; third, C.orham 
(B). Distance, 42 ft. 113{> inches. 



Discus throw. W'on by Fickett (M) 
(M). Distance, 25 ft. IOA4 inches. 

35-pound weight. Won by Fickett 
Gonzals (M). Distance, 44 ft. 3 inches. 



second. Favor (M); third. Alley 
M); second, Favor (M) ; third, 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-SEVEN 



-^iiliiillitlP*'*' 




Mi£Soi^ 

1932 




THE K. OF C. MEET 



I'xtston, January M). 
Arnold Adams Ijroiii^iit 
home tile first prize of 
the indoor season 1)_\" 
winning- the William C. 
I'rout Memorial ()()0 - 
yd. rnn from a classy 
field including;- the hest 
nun in Xew En<>]and 
at the distance. The 
time was 1.15. consid- 
ered to lie exceptional 
for that track. Max 
Wakely, former Bates 
track captain, was third 
in this race. This vic- 
{uvv broui^iit to P)ates 
the beautiful 1' rout 
trophy with Adams' 
name duly inscribed as 
the sixth winner since 
the placjue has been u]) 
for cmnpelitiou. 

Jvussell Jellison en - 
tered a special mile 
race \vhich was won 
b\' the season's record- 
sniashint; runner, (iene 
V'enzke. jellison hn - 
ished fourth in the 
field, coveriui^- the dis- 
tance in 4.25 2/5. 




ARNOLD ADAMS 



FRESHMAN TRACK 

The freshman track team opened its season early in January by taking 
every first place in a dual meet with Deering High School. The final score 
was 75-11. Sheridan of the frosh showed plenty of speed in copping both 
the 40-yd. dash and the 300. Bangs cleared 5 ft. 5 inches in the high jump, 
and Pendleton won the hurdle race in six seconds flat. 

The second meet with South Portland High School resulted in another 
walkaway for the Bobkittens, this time by a 75-,^5 score, Pendleton was 
high point man for the Meet with a first in the low hurdles, a tie for first 
in the high hurdles, and a first in the ,S00. 

The following freshmen received numerals: R. J. Anicetti, R. A. Bangs, 

C, E. Boston, R. A. Hammond, R. ]. Kramer, L. F. Lenzi. D. \V. Mallov, H. 
F. O'Connor, G. A. Olds, F. I. Pendleton, T. E. Nunnally, B. J. Sheridan, 

D. V. Taylor, and E. J. Tierney. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-EIGHT 




Mimloi^ 

- 1932 '" i' 





THE PENN RELAYS 

Philadelphia, April 30. The hrst one-mile relay team to represent Bates 
at the annual Penn Relays during the regime of Coach Thompson was forced 
to take second to Rutgers in a race the closeness of which was indicated by 
the fact that the time of the Garnet fliers was only one-fifth of a second 
slower than that of the winning quartet. 

Russell Jellison was the lead-off man, having landed this position after 
training down from a five-mile race which he had recently won. Jellison 
ran his quarter in 53 seconds flat, and finsihed in third position, ten yards 
back of the leaders. After the batons were exchanged, Clayton Hall, second 
Bates man, had three runners ahead of him. Hall started right out at a fast 
clip, overtaking one opponent on the first turn, passing another on the back 
stretch, and finally taking the lead around the last turn to give Lary a four 
yard lead. Hall's exhibition was his best in competition, and his time was 
51.2. Lary lost the lead as both a Lehigh and a Rutgers man passed him at 
the first oval, but he hung close to them right up to the finish. Arn Adams, 
running in anchor position, started out with an eight yard handicap, but soon 
landed in second p'ace. After a nip and tuck battle with the Lehigh anchor 
man, Adams got out b^ the lead only to be overtaken at the finish by Rutgers' 
fourth man who had been coasting along easily, saving everything for a final 
spurt. Adams was clocked in 48.3. the fastest quarter mile of the race. The 
time of the Rutgers team was 3.27 flat. Lehigh and Lafayette finished in 
third and fourth places respectively. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-NINE 




Mimloi^ 

^ * ^ : 19 32 '" • ' 



111 ,i i^ftefcinjitt^ 




ii^ffir 




PAGE TWO HUNDRED 




Mimloi^ 



uUi ii.l. !l'fc. a«Jl. 




Coach, David B. Morky 



BASEBALL 



OFFICERS 



Manager, Paul ( ). Broggi 





THE TEAM 




First Base 


H. 0. Berry, 


'33 


Second Base 


R. B. SWICTT, 


'33 


Third Base 


E. J. Jekanoski, 


'32 


Shortstop 


F. D. Flynn, 


'33 


Utility 


G. R. Dean, 


'33 


Left Field 


J. F. Murphy, 


'33 




R. E. McCluskey, 


'32 


Center Field 


W. C. Merrill. 


'33 


Right Field 


L E. Fireman, 


'33 




S. E. McCleod, 


'33 


Catchers 


T. R. Brown, 


'32 




J. H. Dillon, 


•34 




K. B. White, 


'35 


Pitchers 


H. F. Millett, 


'34 




O. E. BUGBEE, 


'32 




H. L. LaVallee, 


'33 




J. H. Stevens, 


'33 



Coach Morey issued the first call for baseball candidates early in March, 
and until his return to the campus during spring vacation, practice sessions 
were held under the direction of Ted Brown, veteran catcher. The out- 
look was not altogether promising with but two infielders, one outfielder, 
a pitcher and a catcher reporting as lettermen from the nut too powerful 
nine of the preceding year. 

The late spring held the candidates indoors until the annual Patriots' 
Day game with Bowdoin, which the Bobcats annexed by a 6-5 score. The 
game was exceptionally well played, although the temperature was more 
suitable for hockey. Orimer Bugbee started on the mound for the Garnet, 
giving way in the third inning to LaVallee, who in turn was replaced bv 
Millett in the ninth. Bates batted Emerson, starting Bowdoin hurler. out 
of the box in the first inning as four runs crossed the plate. Two more runs 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED ONE 





^ ^H IQ32 ^-^ ^^ ^..^Muiii*^... 



in the sixth sewed up the first g-ame of the year for the Garnet. The hitting 
of Berry and Flynn and the steadiness of Ted Brown behind the bat were 
features of the game. 

Bates dropped the first state series game to Colby on April 23 by a 3-2 
score. Twenty-three players on both sides were retired by the strikeout 
route as Foster for Colby and Millett for Bates pitched superb ball. Colby's 
eight hits were productive of only three runs, thanks to fast fielding by the 
Garnet infield. Bates scored in the sixth and eighth innings when the Colby 
infield was booting the ball around. The Garnet got three of the four hits 
registered during the afternoon in these two innings allowing I**lynn and 
Brown to score. 

On April 28, Bates lost the first of three games in a row to New Hamp- 
shire by a 1-0 score. The game was a scoreless afifair up to the seventh 
inning when Flannery. a pinch hitter t)n the Durham squad, smashed out a 
double to send in the only run. Mann, New Flampshire's pitching ace, held 
the Garnet to two lone bingles, one each by Murphy and Swett. Bugbee 
and Millett pitched good enough baseball, l)ut w^ere accorded weak support. 

Although Bates scored four runs in the first inning of the game with 
Tufts on April 29, the team was unable to score thereafter as the Jumbos 
tallied five times during the rest of the game. The opposing hurlers each 
allowed Init three hits, and Millett had nine strikeouts to his credit. Weak- 
ness at the bat and miscues in l)all-handling were the main factors in the 
defeat of the Bobcats. 

On April 30, Bates lost a third game to Northeastern University bv an 
8-6 score. LaVallee pitched a fine game up to the seventh inning and then 
was replaced by Millett, whose ofiferings were pounded heavily. The team 
as a whole showed the greatest hitting strength of the year, chalking up nine 
hits including a double by Gus Merrill and a triple l)y Flynn. Berry and 
Flynn led the Bates attack with two hits each. Jekanoski also hit safely 
twice, besides making four putouts and two assists without an error. 

As the Mirror goes to press, the Garnet faces a heavy schedule including 
eight state series games. In the five games already played, the team has 
shown a gradual strengthening, particularly in the infield. The four Maine 
colleges appear to be about on a par this spring, and in spite of early season 
losses, it is expected that the Bates pastimers will finish well up in the final 
standings of the state series. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWO 




- » : : 1932- ' ! -■ 





BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS, Class of 1932 

Although basketl:>all is not at the present time a recognized varsity sport 
at Bates, the class of 1932 put a team on the floor of the Alumni Gymnasium 
early in the winter of 1929 which was never defeated in four years of inter- 
class play. This unusual achievement not only brings due recognition to 
the members of the team, but it also g'ives to the present senior class for 
permanent possession a loving cup ofifered by the Athletic Council in 1930 
to the class team winning the championship three successive years. 

The seven members of this classy outfit have not confined their athletic 
interests to this one sport but are all varsity men in other departments. 
Gorham is a varsity football and track man ; Jekanoski, football and baseball ; 
Knox, track ; Merrill, baseball ; and King-, Sprafke, and Mandelstam, footl:)all. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED THREE 




Mimloi^ 

? H : 1932 ^ 




■l» M,..i,fliiiliiM>»». 



LETTER MEN 



T. R. Brown, 'SZ 

C. B. Chamberlain, '32 

M. Gordon, '32 

E. J. Jekanoski, '32 
R. H. Long, '32 

R. E. McCluskey, '32 

N. MacDonald, '32 

A. W. Mandelstam, '32 

F. J. Mavburv, '32 



N. E. Whitten, '32 
W. J. Fnrtwengler, '32 



C. B. Chamberlain, '32 
R. E. AlcCluskey, '32 
B. F. White, '32 
H. O. Berry, '33 



V. Burati, '32 



H. N. Cole, '32 
C. C. Dill, '32 
N. I. Douglas, '32 
E. W. Knox, '32 
C. E. Sampson, '32 
N. E. Whitten, '32 



T. k. Brown, '32 

R. E. McCluskey, '32 



C. W. Jacobs, '32 



FOOTBALL 

B. X. Sprafke, '32 
P. R. Valicenti, '32 

B. F. White, '32 
D. S. Williams, '32 

C. W. Wing, '32 
H. O. Berry, '33 

]. R. demons, '33 
.1. J. Dobravolsky, '33 
S. W. Farrell, '33 



A. R. Gorham, '33 

J. C. Hall, '33 

F. Italia, '33 

W. L. King, '33 

J. F. Murphy, '33 

F. B. Soba, '34 

R. W. Secor, '35 

E. A. Isaacson, '32, Mgr 

S. Scolnik, '33, Mgr. 



CROSS COUNTRY 

R. E. Jellison, '33 N. I. Douglas, '32, Mgr. 



HOCKEY 

F. 1). Fiynn, '33 
R. H. McCluskey, '33 
J. F. Murphy, '33 
R. B. Swett, '33 

WINTER SPORTS 

X. E. Whitten, '32 

TRACK 

A. G. .\dams, '33 
R. E. Burch, '33 
A. R. Gorliam, '33 
C. H. Hall, '33 
R. E. Jellison, '33 
J. S. Lary, '33 

BASEBALL 

H. O. Berry, '33 
F. D. Flynn, '33 

TENNIS 

M. U. L. Lightman. '32 



CHEER LEADER 

R. LaBovteau.x, '32 



R. W. Secor, '35 
K. B. White, '35 
\'. Belleau, '33. Mgr. 



P. N. Carpenter, '33 



J. B. Eaton, '34 
S. L. Raymond, '34 
I). R. Smith, '34 
K. D. Purinton, '35 
W. A. Clapp, '32, Mgr. 
L. Holman, '33, Mgr. 



H, F. Millett, '.14 

P. O. Broggi, '32. Mgr. 



B. J. Antine, '33 
F. N. Wood, '33 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED FOUR 



h ^ 




ATHLETICS 



1 n r 



^ n r" 




PAGE TWO HUNDRED FIVt 




19 32 





WOMEN'S ATHLETIC BOARD, 1931-1932 



OFFICERS 



President 
Vice- president 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Hockey 

Hiking 

Archery and I 'olley Hall 

Winter Sports 

Basketball 

Baseball and Track 

Soccer 

Tennis 



MANAGERS 



Emily Finn 

Francis Brackett 

Toby Zahn 

Professor Walmsley 



Dorothy Penney 

MiNA Critchell 

Rosamond Melcher 

Althea Howe 

Virginia Lewis 

Gladys Goddard 

Rebecca Cousins 

Frances Cronin 



CLASS REPRESENTATIVES 



Senior 
Junior 
Sophomore 
Athletic Coaches 



Rosemary Lambertson 

Deborah Thompson 

Ruth Johnson 

Professor Walmsley 

AIiss Sanders 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED SIX 







jukiuu -'%.ai:.'^»'lrianTiirU* 



W. A. A. 

This last year has been a very full one for the W. A. A. board with varied and 
interesting" innovations keeping the members on the alert every moment. The new 
Garnet and Black system inaugurated in 1931-32, is only in the experimental stage, 
but from the results of the year's trial, it looks as if the plan were here to stay. 

The two most important alterations brought about in this reorganization are 
tlie change in the system of playing the games, and in the manner of giving the 
awards. Garnet and Black teams are now chosen from each class, and play against 
each other in several intra-class games after which all-college Garnet and P>lack 
teams are chosen.' The winner of this final game contributes to its side a number 
of points toward the cup which is awarded to the color having the higher number 
of points at the end of the year. Thus all girls play together for the same object, 
and much inter-class rivalry is eliminated. Indiviclual awards are based on such 
qualities as skill, interest, attendance, leadership, sportsmanship, and scholarship. 
A special award has been created for training in the form of emblems, the highest 
of which is a Bates seal given for four years of voluntary training. 

Although the reorganization of comjjetition is W. A. A.'s greatest accomplish- 
ment for the year, it is by no means the only one. The Sportland Tour was a 
decided success, and bids fair to prove a lasting feature of W. A. A. This Tour, 
which took place during the first week after the opening of college, served to give 
to the Freshman girls a glimpse into Volley Ball Valley, Tennisville, Hockeyton 
and other communities through which one passes on the way to W. A. A. city. 

Last winter, the W. A. A. moved into new quarters. The office of Rand Gym- 
nasium has l)een transformed into a very business-like looking board-room with a 
directors table and all the other appurtenances. The appropriateness of this den 
for deliberations may have had something to do with all the successful ideas which 
have emanated thence this year. There was a Hare and Hound Chase, the High 
School Play Day, the W. A. A. banquet, not to mention the Demonstration which 
owed its success largely to the eflforts of W. A. A. 

The board certainly deserved recreation after planning and carrying out this 
ambitious program. Two delightful days were spent at Prof. Walmsley's camp 
on Lake Androscoggin. At the annual house party, the members of the old board 
not only enjoyed themselves, but also gave the benefit of their experience to the 
new board, and helped to formulate plans for the coming year. 

In all its work, the W. A. A. board has had as its aim, "A game for every one, 
and every one in a game". To carry out this ideal, the organization has ofifered a 
large variety of activities including not only the old standbys ; hockey, basketball, 
baseball, soccer, tennis, archery, track, and hiking; but also such newer sports as 
riding, handball, badminton, teniquoit, and tetherball. 

We feel that in its work this year \V. A. A. has succeeded in carrying out its 
ideal so aptly expressed in the words of a former president : 

Not merely to win, but to play ; 
Not to destroy, but to build ; 
Not smugness, but beauty in growth ; 
These our aims, — the A. A. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED SEVEN 




miSroi^ 

" ^ i IQ32 ' ^ 




^MujtfU, -uttt M. }t'4m "**■ 



OUR COACHES 




Professor W'almsley may not lie very l)i^', l)Ut she 
has enough concentrated pep for a six-footer. She 
is the personification of the five-fold aim of all 
A.A.'ers. Always at hand when needed! A whiz 
at the sports she coaches ! I^rainy to the "A" de- 
gree ! The hest sport on campus! And she is 
fairly bursting with interest and enthusiasm for all 
W.A.A.'s projects. We like to work with her, and 
we like to play with her. 



PROF. WALMSLEY 



Miss Sanders is the sort of person who just 
"grows on you" as they say. The more we know 
her, the better we like her. How valuable she has 
been this year in jnitting over the new (^larnet and 
Black svstem ! In her quiet way she finds solutions 
to our ])roblenis, and helj^s us more than we some- 
times realize. 

The Seniors owe many an extra W . A. A. ])ractice 
to her. She is the friend of the freshmen, and very 
considerate of their occasional timidity. All of us 
will carry away pleasant recollections of her. 




A1I.SS .sAXDl-.K.s 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED ErGHT 




' ^ M 1932 







Hockey 
Tennis 

Winter Sfort.^ 
Basketball 
Track 



STUDENT COACHES 



Rosamond Miclcher 

Deborah Thompson 

Alice Purington 

ViRGiNiA Lewis 

Gladys Goddard 



ISecause W . A. A. has such a wide and varied program that the two Physical 
Education instructors cannot possibly do all the coaching, W. A. A. last year, 
initiated the student coach plan. This year student coaches were appointed for 
definite sports, and took charge of all W. A. A. practices in those activities. 

I'he plan has worked out very well, and will prohably he used again next year. 
The student coaches, themselves, are very enthusiastic about their work, and also 
glad of the opportunity to gain experience which will I)e of value after graduation. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED NINE 




1932 ■ 






ll ifliiMI 




"B" GIRLS 



Emily F'inn, '32 
Rosemary Ivambertson, '32 
Gladys Goddard, '32 
Rosamond Nichols, '32 
Gertrude Diggery, '32 



Altliea Howe, '32 
Alice Hellier, '32 
Muriel Bliss, '32 
Esther Jackson, '32 
Kdith Lerrigo, '32 



Deborah Thompson, '31 
Rosamond Melcher, '31 
Norma Hinds. '31 



To 1)6 a "B" girl is an even greater honor at i)resent than in any years past. 
The distinctive w^hite sweater with the Garnet "B" is granted not on a basis of 
teams made, hut rather on a basis of skill, faithful practice, interest in W. A. A. 
activities, sportsmanshij), and a good scholarship average. Few people receive this 
award, and those lucky few have reason to be proud of their achievement. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TEN 




WHwai It I pi mn 

> ; I932'-"'- ii 
HOCKEY 



j^^iu ->iii.MiiMUIi^ 



1L ^ '" 



%j«i»*' 



I ' 




1 



R. Lambertson, '32, Ca/i^ 

F. Cronin, '32 

AI. Briggs, '32 

R. Benham. '33 

D. DiGGERY, '33 

D. Thompson, '33 

V. Lewis, '33 

D. AUGUSTINUS, '33 

V. Brackett, '34 
M. Thorpe, '35 
R. Frye, '35 



GARNETS 

Manager, Dorothy Penney, '33 

Hockeyites, the first to try out the new system of class division into Garnets 
and Blacks, and also the first to try on the new garnet and black pinnies, went at 
their play with such sustained enthusiasm that they would suggest an addition of 
nose guard and brass knuckles to next year's equipment. 

Scores were very close, running to ties. However, the early snows drove our 
hearty hockeyites to an unwelcome cover before the full quota of three games a 
class could be completed. 

Final Standing 
Black 
2 
5 



Seniors 



Juniors 



Garnet 
4 

5 
2 
3 

Varsity 



Sophomores 
Freshmen 



Garnet 
1 


5 
2 



Black 
1 
1 

2 
2 



Garnets 1 



Blacks 



R. MelchER, '33, Captain 

F. Brackett, '33 
M. Reid, '34 

C. CONANT, '33 
A. PURINGTON, '33 

C. CuTTs, '33 
M. CuRTiss. '33 
C. BuMPus, '34 
C. Zahn, '34 

G. GODDARD, '32 

E. Finn, '32 




BLACKS 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED ELEVEN 




THE 



Vlll^l^OI^ 



^f^u, 'I'm 'III' liiwi.i.^M. 






\ 










Fl 


\ 




>>.^^H 




y 




"" ■■3 




f- 


^^H 








1^^* 


M 






■^ 


IS— S 







AJanagcr 
MINA CRITCHELL, '32 



HIKING 



A nice l)risk walk over hill and dale to Thorncrag, 
to Greene, to nowhere and hack again in 55 minutes, 
or just wandering leisurely over the fallen pine 
needles along the Androscoggin is the choice of a 
Hates co-ed hiker during the fall season. Because 
of the larger numhers needed for the teams in the 
major sports under the new (larnet and Black sys- 
tem, hiking lost some of its recruits this fall. How- 
ever, the faithful few, hesides the three 55-minute 
periods a week, hiked the extra six and nine miles 
in order to win the ])()ints for their Black or (larnet 
team. The 12-mile hike of former years was elimi- 
nated. We are hoping that hy a complete revision 
of rules for hiking, this universally popular activity 
may he hrought hack as a major sport. 



ARCHERY 



In spite of the helpful suggestions vociferated 
frcjm the region of Parker Hall, archery seems to 
hecome increasingly popular, and more interesting to 
the Bates co-eds. Many of the "Dianas" have he- 
come very apt in this newly popularized sport. 



Bates entered the Second Annual ^ 



Last s]jring. 

Intercollegiate Spring Archery Tournament which 
was run oS as a telegraphic meet. Scores were 
necessarily delayed hecause of rain, so that the tour- 
nament was not as successful as it might otherwise 
have heen. The total score sent was 166 hits — 742 
])oints, with only five shooting to compete with the 
full team of eight shooting for the other colleges. 



The participants were ; 
Rebecca Carter 
Mary Hoag 
Deborah Thompson 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWELVE 



Eileen Soper 
Mary Swasey 




Manager 
ROSAMOND AlELCHER, '33 




mirHoi^ 

ill i 19 32^' i-' 




VOLLEYBALL 




V. Geddes, '34, Captain 

T. KiTTREDGE. '33 

G. Gearing, '35 

G. HoBBS, '35 

R. Rounds, '34 

J. Hill. '34 

F. Rav, "35 

D. Barton, '35 

C. AIcKenney, '35 



GAkXKT.s 

Manager, Rosamond ]\IelciiER, '33 

If there are any games which arouse more interest than the volleyhall games 
did this year, they would l)e well worth witnessing. Even the passerljy heard the 
screams and intermingled laughter, and had they chanced to come into the Locker 
Building, thev would have seen a mixture of arms, legs, and heads all trying 
frantically to keep the hall from touching on their side. The newest adherents to 
the game, the freshmen, were divided into Garnet and Black, and in Ixith games 
played, the Garnets pinned defeat on their rivals. 

Even more furiously waxed the battle between the Garnet and Black sopho- 
mores. Three games had to be played before the Garnets finally showed their 
superiority. Expert i)layers, who have for years been inter-class volleyball cham- 
pions, rivaled each other in the junior games, the Blacks winning both games 
played. 



AL Shapiro, '33. Captain 
H. Parker, '33 
M. Chick, '34 
R. Frye, '35 
G. Lepage. '34 

D. Sweeney. '34 
C. Bum PUS, '34 

E. FosDicK. '35 

F. Larrabee. '34 




BLACKS 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED THIRTEEN 




Ml 61^015 

^ ■ 1932 



»t fMi»...^tt. 




BASEBALL 




GARNETS 



R. Lambertson, 'i2, dipt. 

AI. I^.RICGS, '32 

K. Hall, '32 
R. Nichols. '32 
AL Wheelkr, '34 

M. ^klORONG, '33i 

A. Edwards, '34 
V. Lewis, '33) 

D. Thompson, '33 

E. Oliver, '35 



Manager, Gladys Goddard, '32 

A l)rightly lighted cage and heated practice and competition within meant, 
during the late fall season, not men training for a track meet, but girls playing 
baseball with vim and vigor. 

The vim of the Garnets seemed to be the stronger this year. They lost their 
footing only when the junior Blacks won the second class game, and also the play- 
off. The Garnets completed their fine work by winning the varsity game with a 
score of 10-8. 



E. Finn, '32, Captain 
G. Goddard, '32 

C. Thompson, '33 

A. Purington, '33 
C. Zahn, '34 

M. Reid, '34 

C. CONANT, '33 

M. CuRTiss, '33 

B. McGrath, '33 

F. Brackett, '33 




BLACKS 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED FOURTEEN 




THE 

HI! 1932 ^^!/ ^Z 

WINTER SPORTS 





M. BooTHBY, Captain 
L. Mallinson 
A. Skillins 
G. Gearing 
H. Dean 

^f. \\'hkeler 



GARNETS 

Maiuujcr, Althea Howe, 'ii 

Although Mother Nature did not favor us witli very seasonable weather this 
year, yet Winter Sports were a success. 

What a bevy of vivid winter sports costumes ! What unique slides and tum- 
bles! What fun! 

This sport gave one more illustration of the successful apijlication of the new 
Garnet and Black system. After two weeks of preliminary trials in snowshoe and 
ski dashes, ski slides for form and distance, and skating events, the most skilled 
enthusiasts were chosen for the Garnet and Black Class teams. The winners of 
these semi-finals were cho.sen for the varsity Garnet and Black Teams captained 
respectively by Alarjory Boothby and Ronny Melcher. 

As for the score, the freshmen Garnets won, 4-2; the sophomores tied. 4-4; 
and the junior Blacks were victorious with four points to the two of the Garnets. 
The varsity Garnet and Black game was a tie. 2)-2i, making an equal division of 
points for the season. 



R. Meecher, Captain 

D. Chick 
M. Reid 

E. ( )liver 

M. SWASEY 

M. Harris 




BLACKS 

PAGE TWO HUNDRED FIFTEEN 




^ • 19 32 



3^ 



IT /La^ 



BASKETBALL 






R. LambKrtsox. Captain 
X. Hinds 
vS. Hughes 
H. Shorev 
V. Lewis 

R. XlCHOLS 



(lARNETS 

Manager. Virginia Lewis, '33 

Who has the ball? What's the score? Rand gymnasium witnessed many close 
and clever games of basketball this winter. The combined senior-junicjr teams 
played as they have never played before with the l^lacks pt)pping up ahead at the 
last minute. The sophomore teams were closely matched, and. although the Blacks 
won, the Garnets were not very far behind. The freshmen certainly "played the 
game for the game's sake", and are to be commended. 

The varsitv Garnet and Black teams were equally matched, and it is rumored 
that Rand gvmnasium never witnessed a faster, cleaner game. As the last whistle 
blew shrilly, everyone held her l,reath while the umpire announced the score, 
"Black 32. Garnet 28!" 



E. Finn, Captain 
L. Blanc HARD 

M. CONLEY 

T. Zahn 

G. GODUARD 

R. Gaelixari 




Kmssr 



1!L..\CKS 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED SIXTEEN 




mirHoi^ 

'932 



M 






TENNIS 




l\l iiiiiiycr 
FRANCES CROXIX, 



-32 



Tennis, always one of the favorite sports, is grow- 
ing in po])ularity each season. There are classes 
with regular instruction for hoth Physical Ivlucation 
and W. A. A. people. In both the spring and fall 
seasons, competition is carried on Ijy a system of 
ladder tournaments. There are three ladders, one 
for beginners, one for intermediates and one for 
advanced players. The girls holding the four high- 
est places at the end of the season are champions and 
contribute points to the final Garnet or Black score. 

When the weather does not permit out-of-door 
activity. ])addle-tennis in the gymnasium has proved 
to be an ade(|uate and enjoyable substitution. 



TRACK 



Instead of the usual Memorial Day track meet, 
the trials and finals of all events were run ofi^ during 
class hours. The Marathons took place on Rand 
field ; the rest of the events, such as javelin, discus, 
broad jump, and high jumj). took place at the foot 
of Mt. David. Points were awarded to individual 
participants on an average basis. With the new sys- 
tem, we expect that the Garnet and Black track meet 
will enjoy increased popularity. 




Manager 
GLADYS GODDARD, '32 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED SEVENTEEN 




till 1932?^^^^/ 





Rosamond Melcher, 'ii 
Gladys Goddard, 'i2 
Crescentia Zahn, '34 
Alice Purington, '33 



SOCCER 



THE TEAM 

Rosemary Lambertson, "32 
Ruth Benham, '3i 
Charlotte Cutts, '3i 
Virginia Lewis, 'ii 



Emily Finn, 'i2 
Marjorie Briggs, 'i2 
Dagmar Augustiniis, 



'ii 



This team, which displayed its wares on Rand Field a year ago in the 
spring of 1931, represented the last Bates girls' athletic group to play under 
the old system which was in use ])revious to the present Garnet-Black organization. 
From a reading of the line-up it is evident that the class of 1933 boasted the 
largest number of superior players in soccer last year. These girls, sopho- 
mores then, played commendable soccer, came through with the class cham- 
pionship, and placed six girls on the varsity team. 

It is very probal)le that the varsity Garnet and Black soccer teams this 
year will include these same fine senior and junior players plus some excellent 
material which is being developed in the present freshman and sophomore 
classes. 

As the Mirror goes to press the bright spring sun reveals an enthusiastic group 
of girls on Garcelon Field, wearing shiny garnet and l)lack pinnies and promising 
a successful soccer season for 1932. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED EIGHTEEN 




THE 

I ill 19 32 '■■■ 






Women's Physical Education Demonstration 

The animal physical education demonstration meet took place on March 17th in 
Rand Gymnasium. The Garnets again were the favored ones, for, although they 
scored low in previous practices, they came through at the crucial moment, and won 
the meet with a margin even greater than that of last year. 

The affair was very well attended as is customary. It is at this time that we 
see just how great an outside interest there is in the physical education of the Bates 



girls. 



4. 

5. 



Garnet vs. Black Competition 

Apparatus Stunts 

English Country Dancing 
Gathering Peascods 
Goddesses 

Individual Gymnastics 



Sophomores 
Freshmen 



Juniors 

Sophomores 

Freshmen 

Juniors 



Stunts and Tumbling 

Games Tournament 

All Fours Relay Freshmen 

Ohject Pass Relay Sophomores 

Pass and Stoop Relay Juniors 

Games Demonstration Seniors 

Paddle Tennis Tether Ball 
Badminton Ring Tennis 

Presentation of Awards of the Women's Athletic Association 

BY Emily F. Finn, President 

Results of the Meet President Clifton D. Gray 



Alma Mater 



Judges 

Miss R. Marjorie Briggs 

Miss Emily F. Finn 

Miss Rosemary Lambertson 



Scorers 

Miss Kate R. Hall 
Miss Edith M. Lerrigo 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED NINETEEN 




THE 



Mli^l^OI^ 



I I I 



932 





PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY 




PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE 




Mimloi^ 



*'Mu,<i. .liiu ^' ..... .^-.^ifci 




Autobiography of Uncle Sam Pepys 

(Written after his insanity j 

I was born long long ago, years before the great war, at the tender age of six 
or seven. (There is no definite record.) My birth at the age of seven astounded 
the world's greatest philosophers, for usually a newly born babe starts in against 
this cruel world at the age of zero. My first bit of fame came to me through the 
fact that I was born in the woods, thus l)ecoming the original "babe in the woods". 
Before long, or soon after, 1 realized that 1 was known far and wide, especially 
wide, because of my uncanny ability to compose lyrics which had neither rhyme 
nor reason, and were not lyrics anyway. Even the Governor of Siam came to 
hear me compose. How I could recite Tiger Rag. I can picture myself now. 
In order to make my recital more realistic, I usually procured a living Tiger and 
wrestled with it. My unbelievaljle strength (it often frightened me) soon would 
reduce the Tiger to an old disheveled rag — thus originating the name Tiger Rag. 
And how I could hold that Tiger ! Ah, yes, I come from a very clever family. 
I never believed in Santa Claus or the Devil because I knew they were really my 
father. 

After a few years of brilliant entertainment and super-human feats, I became 
quite interested in aviation. At that distant time, as you all know, aviation did not 
consist of speedy planes or gargantuan dirigibles ; instead all air travel was accom- 
plished by means of balloons. I need not become eloquent about my speedy 
proficiency at this "racket". Let it suffice to say that I learned all there was to 
know in less time than it takes to play the Koran on a Bass Drum. After one 
week I held seven hundred records (Governmental) and this was considered by 
many as remarkable, in that I was still young. One of my greatest achievements 
was in establishing a new altitude record. As you all know, balloons depend on 
inflations of hot air to rise. On that eventful day, I filled my gas bag with some 
of this hot air, and began my ascension. I was extremely foresighted and took my 
diary along with me, and also my collapsible step-ladder. The balloon left the 
earth with a tremendous rush, and soon I was soaring above the clouds. Higher, 
higher, and still higher, until I was within reaching distance of the old record. 
Then the balloon stopped its mad climb and remained motionless. What to do? 
Then I remembered the ladder. I took this out and climbed to the top of my 
balloon. I set the ladder in place on the top of the bag, climbed to its very top, 
and then reached down and ])ulled the balloon up after me. This bit of ingenuity 
gave me the new record by three feet. Then, unfortunately, I lost my altitude 
recorder, so that my real record was forever lost to humanity. My real record ! 
Oh, if only I could prove this. It happened thusly. No sooner had I established 
the record of which I have already spoken, when I received an inspiration from 
Jove. Why not experiment with my diary? So I took it out, held it under the 
mouth of the gas bag, and began to read from it. This compressed hot air entered 
the bag, and away I went — a veritable juggernaut. Up and uj). The more I read, 
the faster and higher I went. Ah, the consummate joy of it all. I read and read, 
and days pas.sed. Soon the balloon had ascended to unheard of altitudes. God 
only knows how far beyond the Karth I would have risen, had not the ordinary 
people on earth become frightened because I was up so high. Naturally I had lost 
all sense of time or distance, but officials say I was up so high, and remained aloft 
so long, that they had to shoot me down a month later for fear I would starve 
to death. My other experiences in a space ship were just as exciting, but I am 
only able to tell you of one of them here. Just after my fame began to cool, I 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO 




THE 




decided to attempt another stunt which had thus far Ijeen found impossible. And 
I was successful. Ah, success is indeed sweet. This last feat was as follows. 
I was the first man to ever perform sixteen outside loops in a balloon without any 
air in the Ijag, and without turning the craft at all. That may sound simple, but 
when you realize that I was handicapped by an outboard Deisel engine which was 
set in reverse you can easily imagine the fortitude and spiritual strength which was 
necessary in order to perform this stunt. Needless to say, my fame became uni- 
versal for this. When I came down, I was asked how I felt. My answering 
speech will go down in History as a perfect example of simple modesty. It was as 
follows : "Men, I deserve no credit for that. Any super-human man could do 
the same thing." I was rewarded for this performance by thirty weeks of 
R. K. O. time, and did I slay them on that circuit? I had them rolling in the 
aisles. As an exponent of the Drama I became more famous than as "The 
Miracle Man" of aviation. I went abroad and played "Hamlet" before the King 
of England — was crowned. My name became a household word. All America, 
3-ea, all the world, constantly had the name "Uncle Sam" at their tongues end. 
However, like all great men, I had many obstacles to overcome. Curbstones, 
et cetera. Before long 1 became the greatest obstacle overcomer the world had ever 
known or could ever hope to know. This soon paled. And I searched for new 
fields to conquer. I had troulile with my health. It was so good that all the medi- 
cal minds were worried. A sea voyage was recommended as a means of making 
my health worse so I took one. I obtained a job as Captain of a schooner. I did 
quite a job on this schooner, and on the myriad schooners which followed, until 
there was no more beer. So a baseball game was started on the mainmast. My 
team lost, and therefore my job, for it was the custom at that time for the Captain 
of a ship to resign whenever one of the two teams lost a ball game. Undaunted, 
I soon obtained a job as a sailmaker on a trans-continental motor ship. (These 
were unknown at the time.) This ship was bound for the Sahara with a load of 
sand, and suited my plans perfectly, for I was very fond of fried oasis. We had 
been sailing for seven days and had progressed about a mile (it wasn't a very fast 
ship, or would you say it was fast) when it struck a matchbox and instantly sunk 
in three days. All hands were lost. However, the rest of the anatomies were 
saved. At the time of this accident I was unable to swim. But I knew I had it in 
me, for my father was a famous drunkard who often came swimming home. So 
I took a beautiful "swan" dive from the prow at the rear of the ship, and upon 
hitting the water, I struck up a beautiful six beat crawl stroke. I would have 
perished like a rat sitting in the muzzle of a Howitzer, had not an anchor come 
floating by. I climbed up on the anchor and soon landed on a desert Isle. There 
wasn't a living thing around, so I took a cab to the nearest hotel. At this hotel 
I lived a live of ease for an hour or so, when they asked for my rent. The only 
rent I had was a fairly large one in my trousers, so they murdered me. This made 
me very angry, and I immediately decided to leave the island. I took a subway to 
Queens where I obtained employment shoveling wind from off the City Hall roof. 
I found that this form of work was doing my remarkable physique much harm so 
I decided to become a wrestler. Those who had only a photographic acquaintance 
with me thought I was too fat for wrestling. But I was not fat. I had rolls of 
muscle around my waist as large as balloon tires. When I reclined in a chair 
these muscles rested one upon the other like so many sleeping co])ras. I was only 
four feet seven inches in height at the time in my bare feet — if my callouses hadn't 
been pared. If they had been pared, I was somewhat shorter. Not much, but a 
little. Upon my left thigh was a strawberry birthmark. I was sensitive about it 
and always turned my left side away from the camera. My favorite picture does 
not reveal my left side. I often remarked that this birthmark was the only thing 

PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE 





THE 



that ever kept me out of Ziegfekl's follies. My wrestling career was short lived 
for one (lav this strawherrv birthmark of mine started spreading and I almost died 
of Scarlet Fever. Alas and alack, the Universe lost its greatest ])otential exponent 
of the wrestling industry. 

I went to the doughnut fields of Brussels in order to recuperate from this Fever, 
and to attempt to regain my lost appetite. It was here, while studying the stomach, 
that I composed my great masterpiece which will undoubtedly be handed down 
from generation to generation. For those of you who are so unfortunate as to be 
unfamiliar with this work, I include it in this story of my life. 

Relation of the Stomach to the Laboring Class 

The stomach, or if you prefer, the lower chest, is in the mind of fashion. The 
bustle is slipping and prosperity is just around the corner. We learn from History 
(but not much) that every war has its period of inflation followed Ijy its period of 
depression followed by an escort of police motorcycles ( which guard this depression 
coma). Somewhere in the traffic of souls the lower chest (stomach) was sunk. 
But let us of the lost General Electric not disjiair. With the gradual return of 
better times and all you can eat for sixty cents comes the era of the full week job, 
the full dress suit, and the full lined stomach. There was a day when we were 
taught to disregard our stomachs, giving them just the merest nod of recognition, 
or a dollar at Christmas. But we have learned. W^e have learned that nature 
intended us to have stomachs, or why should we have bicarbonate of soda? Why 
should we have appendicitis? That however, is beneath the point. Beneath the 
point and a little to the right. The differences between a good foundation and a 
proper corporation is only the difference of ideas concerning the New Testament, 
but don't let any one believe for a moment that bringing back the middle back 
(lower chest) is all beer and roast duck and apple sauce, or even Effesyp with 
gruppled munthrees. The breadbasket is so devised as to require food, and the 
essence of my theory is that if the stomach is treated like a man, if the stomach 
is to be, then it will gather no moss, and love makes the world go round. 

You can easily see how this expression of the old in manner so undoubtedly 
new astounded the world anew and was the means of my return to America. No 
sooner did word of my remarkable "brain child" become common, than some 
officials came over from America and took me to this beautiful group of buildings 
where I can work in peace and quiet. They let no one near me. They are so 
thoughtful. However, if any of you should care to discuss any of my feats 
further, you may write to me in care of the Augusta State Insane Asylum. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR 




Mimloi^ 









n 32. 




The Most Popular Man: 

Randolph Weatherbee was the recipient of a veritable landslide of votes. 
vSuch popularity is deserved. The "rise of Rand" easily explains "Rudy's" 
waning power. This should appear in "Bracketts". 

The Most Popular Woman: 

Julia Hriggs emerged victorious over Frances Cronin l)y one vote. We under- 
stand that if "Joe" was in the class of 1932 the voting would have been much 
closer. A very difficult decision. 

The Best Looking Man: 

None other than Benjamin Franklin White, 3rd. Too bad he favored the 
other side of the river. His profile is one to make Greeks turn green with 
envy. 

The Best Looking Woman: 

The vote for Alice Hellier might easily l)e called unanimous. Such ethereal 
beauty is rarely seen by mortal man. 

The Best Athlete (Man) : 

Ray AlcCluskey is our choice for the best athlete. He was outstanding in 
three sports. They build them rugged in Houlton. 

The Best Athlete (Woman) : 

Emily Finn receives our vote here. She is from a family of athletes, and 
certainly "does them proud". 

The Best Dressed Man: 

Maxfield Gordon had but little competition. However, his roommate claims 
at least half the honors. 

The Best Dressed Woman : 

At this time Frances Cronin steps in and shows the other co-eds just what 
should be worn. We prophesy that a certain hockey man will need a tremen- 
dous salarv. 

The Tallest Man: 

Benjamin White is the "Empire State Building" of Bates. Just another 
"tower" of strength. 

The Tallest Woman : 

Emily Finn was "away up" in the voting. She receives unanimous attention 
for "Lofty ambitions". 

PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE 




niiMniiiiiiiniiiiri ■ -"""o 1^70^^ '' " ^u;:^. "^ 'm' i'if»*-----" 




The Shortest Man: 

William Ik'.'ui — and he isn't much taller — received the acclaim of the multitude. 
We fail to understand how anyone ever saw him. 

The Shortest Woman : 

Little Jeannette Gottesfeld snared a big handful of ballots. She apparently 
grew more mentall}' than she did physically. 

The Class Baby (Man) : 

Norman Whitten toddled off with the majority here. Just a "Whit" of a lad. 
A very "Judy-icious" vote. 

The Class Baby (Woman) : 

Mildred Vining won the bottle in this contest. Such a lovely little baby. 
W^hose "baby" is she? 

The Biggest Sleepyhead (Man) : 

Mildred Vining won the Ijottle in this contest. Such a lovely little baby, 
that Prexy has been appointed to rouse him when the diploma distribution 
occurs. 

The Biggest Sleepyhead (Woman) : 

Dorothy Sullivan has been chosen the "Sleeping Beauty" of the class, with 
Rebecca Cousins Ijeside her. Is there so much to Morpheus? Be careful, 
m'children, there's bound to be an awakening. 

The Most Talented Man : 

Randolph W'eatherbee takes his place beside our famous men. 

The Most Talented Woman: 

Aubigne Gushing defies anyone to name something she can't do. How unjust 
of the "Fates" to give one woman so much. 

The Most Studious Man: 

Wendell Ray thoroughly enjoys losing himself in his work. He has been lost 
for four years, but to far better purpose than most of us. 

The Most Studious Woman: 

Bernice Burnham is reinited to work hardest and most consistently. So many 
of the co-eds received votes that we must assume that they all "grind" more 
or less. 

The Biggest Time-killer (Man) : 

Charles Demarest won the "plaster of Paris" wreath in this struggle. The 
mystery is — how can a man be a time-killer and Phi Bete? 

The Biggest Time-killer (Woman) : 

Frances Stevens received the tissue paper plaque. How awful ; she may have 
to go to work after this June. 

The Smoothest Man: 

This vote went to Maxfield Gordon. So you should know the meaning of the 
word "smooth". 

The Smoothest Woman: 

Margaret Hines earned this caption. Her suave manner and appearance are 
to be envied by many of her contemporaries. She certainly has manv of the 
cosmopolitan attributes. 

PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-SIX 




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Profs' Favorite (Man) : 

Calvin Chamljfiiain received the majority vote for "teacher's pet". The 
"drag" he enjoys is a story in itself. Nothing like spreading oil on trouhled 
waters. 

Profs' Favorite (Woman) : 

Muriel Gower seems to he the favored of the faculty. Well, it certainly has 
its good points. 

The Noisiest Man: 

Raljjh Long won the engraved tomhstone for his ability to disturb sound 
waves. He makes more noise than two skeletons wrestling on a tin roof. 

The Noisiest Woman: 

The noisiest woman is Frances Stevens. The only time she ever stopped 
talking, she played the piano. 

The Biggest Line: 

Maxfield Gordon talked his way into one more vote than did Rand Weather- 
bee. Have you ever heard him at Chase of a Saturday Eve? He claims it is 
patented, but we have heard the same thing before. 

The Biggest Line: 

The vote for the greatest female exponent of the great "Spanish custom" 
goes to Margaret Hines. Can you imagine the conversation which transpired 
the night she had a date with "Max"? 

The Happiest Man: 

Ralph Long was adjudged the happiest man. Does his recent marriage 
explain this ? 

The Happiest Woman: 

Julia Briggs is "Little Miss Sunshine". She wears her smile everywhere, 
but it is broadest when she approaches Parker Hall. It seems that she knows 
"un petit garcon" who lives there. 

The Biggest Man Hater : 

Constance Curry seems to be most prejudiced against them. Oh, Connie, 
please change your mind. We really aren't so bad. 

The Biggest Woman Hater: 

Ray Ak^Cluskey is well remembered for this trait. Apj)arently, he has found 
them out. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-SEVEN 




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'^ * ? M932 ■ ^ ■ I! .ilj^l 



The Biggest Vamp (Man) : 

.Maxfk'ld (idrdon walks off with this tr(»])hy. When a man is vottvl the 
"smootliest" and tlie "hi^s;est hne" he is Ijound to (h'aw a select ilarem. 

The Biggest Vamp (Woman) : 

(k'Ttrude White came throu,^h this gruelins^ grind with her eye winking at a 
terrific rate of speed, fler conquests constitute a \ast majority of the male 
element at I>ates. 

The Best Disposition (Man) : 

Peter Valicenti is a most agreeahle chap, lie doesn't even l)ecome irate at the 
prospect of giving up Sahattus at the end of this term. 

The Best Disposition (Woman) : 

W'l'at a hattle ! Marion ]')lake has the hetter disposition by one vote than has 
lulia Briggs. Do vou reallv feel at peace with the world when vou arise, 
''Buddy"? 

The Most Collegiate Man: 

The vote for the typical college man goes to Afaxfield (lordon. Ifave you 
seen all the "college movies". Max? 

The Most Collegiate Woman: 

Frances Cronin merits the Pi.stachio-flavored chocolate sundae as the most 
collegiate woman. We expect to see her likeness in "College Humor" any 
day now. 

The Best Dancer (Man) : 

I'arker Mann is the ladies' favorite on the waxed floor. "Skippy" merits 
much praise for Parker's rhythmic movements in the dance. 

The Best Dancer (Woman) : 

(lertrude \\'hite receives acclaim for her dancing ahilit)'. They say she can 
"follow" a one-legged man doing the rhumha to waltz time. 

The Best Orator (Man) : 

William Dunham is outstanding as the "Demosthenes" of the class. Blis work 
is known all over the State, at least. He will need all these vocal and mental 
powers if he expects to keep "Betty" all to himself. 

The Best Orator (Woman) : 

Edith Lerrigo was so far ahead in this vote that we have decided she is the 
best "oratress" Bates has ever had. 

The Most Efficient Man: 

Ivandolph W'eatherbee is still jjulling in the honors. Associates certainly 
recognize managing ability and thoroughness. We note that he has also been 
very efficient in matters pertaining to the other sex. 

The Most Efficient Woman: 

Ivlith Lerrigo polls a strong vote as the most elhcient woman, v^^he is to the 
women as "Rand" is to the men — relative to thoroughness. 

The Wittiest Man: 

A mo.st unusual man is Randoli)h W'eatherbee. His wit is likened to "Pa" 
Gould's classes — never a dull moment. "Fran" claims he attained his fluent 
re]jartee through composing impromptu excuses. 

The Wittiest Woman: 

Rebecca Cousins is capable of keeping the girls amused even after a vSunday 
meal at Rand Hall. This requires wit. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-EIGHT 



"*' " THE • '•'^^mm^^ 



The Best Built Man: 

I'.ciijaniin W hitc li'id hut little competition in this event. Imagine, good looks 
and the physi(|ue of a "I.eiderman"' disciple. 

The Best Built Woman: 

h'rances Cronin seems to he a jjotential model for McClelland I'arclay. 

Done Most For Bates (Man) : 

Valerv Hurati was outstanding in the voting for this honor. If we attempted 
to list his "good deeds" for Bates, we would he compelled to add three more 
pages to this section. 

Done Most For Bates (Woman) : 

Ivlith Lerrigo was thousands and thousands of votes ahead of the field. Very 
little exi)lanation is necessary for those who know Edith. 

Favorite Professor: 

R. R. X. Gould had a majority. Rumor has it that students would rather 
have "Pa" as their prof than get a good mark with someone else. 

Favorite Subject: 

History just topped French as the favored course of the class. 

Dullest Subject : 

English seems to he duller than is Psychology. 

Pleasantest Year: 

The Senior year, full of picked courses and time-killing is selected as the 
most pleasant. 

Dullest Year : 

The Soi:)homore year, when we were still young and seeking that which we 
have not yet found, seems to he the dullest. 

Favorite Actor: 

A])parently the vote of the women defeated the vote of the men. Clark Gahle 
emerged supreme over Robert Montgomery. 

Favorite Actress : 

Greta Garho languorously overcame an early lead to defeat Joan Crawford 
by a mere single vote. 

Favorite Indoor Sport : 

Necking received the largest aggregate of votes, as expected, hut hriflge and 
basketball followed closely. 

Favorite Outdoor Sport : 

White flannels won out over shoulder pads and hip pads to give tennis the 
margin on this question. 

Favorite Author : 

P>y s])ecial jjermission of the copyright owners. Wilder and O'Neill are the 
lucky fellows. 

Favorite Book : 

Why was this (juestion inserted? Evervone seems to have a favorite book of 
their own. "The I'ridge of vSan Puis Key" had a small majoritv. 

Favorite College (Other than Bates) : 

Dartmouth and the L'niversitv of Alaine received most attention. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-NINE 





Mimloi^ 

Uncle Sam's Last Pepys 

Ah, mv admiring public . . . How good it seems to be back in the fold . . . I've 
been A. W. O. L. for some time . . . They said I was insane . . . Really I'm not . . . 
It's merely been the reaction due to keeping so many faculty secrets under cover . . . 
Education is a wonderful institution . . . Women are wonderful institutions . . . 
What is wonderful about the faculty? ... I heartily agree with you! . . . Why 
should I go on in this fashion? . . . Why should I leave their dire deeds a baffling 
mystery? . . . And to relieve my teeming mind, I must needs lift this tremendous 
burden . . . Then I'll I)e able to walk the streets of any of the great cities of the 
world just as does any mortal man . . . So lend me your ears ... I am in the mood 
for filling them . . . And accompanied by a fanfare of trumpets, old Uncle Sam 
swings into the old refrain . . . The refrain from the faculty . . . Refrain from this 
and refrain from that . . . For years and years its been "refrain" . . . Mrs. Pres. 
C. D. Gray is the power behind the throne in this college of ours . . . Perhaps 
that isn't news ... I don't know how much you know . . . Let's take the case of 
Prof. Zerby . . . You all know he teaches religion . . . Yet he doesn't really believe 
in the Devil . . . He claims it's like vSanta Claus — your father . . . Prof. Rob is 
another of those who have assumed an alias . . . His official title is Professor of 
Public Speaking . . . Yet, how many times has he actually spoken in public? . . . 
I ask you . . . Prof. Dutchy Leonard is ordinarily a very gentle individual, but did 
you know that he has a dual personality? . . . And that he beats his wife every 
Sunday afternoon? . . . There's your faculty for you . . . Freddy Knapp, the old 
rounder, was at one time the greatest exponent of the Drama ever known in colle- 
giate theatrical circles . . . And I've been told by his brother that Pom spends 
rainy days toasting blue marshmallows . . . Who'd have thunk it? . . . Doc Britan's 
boyhood ambition has yet to be fulfilled . . . That is to really have lived the e.xperi- 
ences he tells as true stories . . . Goosie Chase, while a student here at Bates, was 
the leading tenor of the choir . . . Then his voice changed to its present dulcet 
soprano . . . Bill Whitehorne, before he came to Lewiston, was the idol of the 
Chine.se bandits ... So ferocious a leader, so relentless an enemy, had never before, 
or after, been seen . . . Prof. Ramsdell is very superstitious about eating Taran- 
tulas . . . What a "softie" . . . He claims 'tis more than just an imaginary fear, 
but experience has shown that they are not harmful to the digestion ... Pa Gould 
has yet to overcome his first affair of the heart . . . He was so disappointed when 
a boy, and so sad, that he now hates to see anyone happy . . . That is the why and 
wherefore of the low grades he hands out . . . And he saws wood with his left 
hand . . . To look at Greasy Carroll, would you realize that he is wild atout 
chocolate sundaes? . . . Prof. McDonald is afraid of women, and very bashful in 
private life . . . His favorite author is Mother Goose, and his passion bedtime stories 
. . . Prof. Lawrance became famous through accident . . . While exi>erimenting 
with one of his wife's recipes for angel cake, he discovered the strongest alloy the 
world has ever known . . . What price, glorious? . . . Sammie Harms, as you well 
know, smiles continuously . . . Have you ever wondered why? ... It really isn't 
because he is thinking of those he has flunked . . . Nay, and again nay . . . It's 
merely because someone once told him he had nice teeth . . . ( )llie Cutts, besides 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED THIRTY 




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PAGE TWO HUNDRED THIRTY-ONE 




Mim:!oi^ 

i f I I 1932 ' 



1)eing a former Ail-American tackle, ranks with the best in amateur theatricals . . . 
His picture, with a flowin<^- mustachio, may be seen at Chase at any time . . . Eddie 
Wright was once as tall as you and I and had small feet . . . But he wished for 
larger feet . . . And in the operation, they had to turn some of liim up . . . 
Fancy that ... in its ramifications . . . Madame Gilbert is very fond of Varsity 
sweaters . . . By this I mean, the wearer is assured of ten points more (or 
less) on his final grade . . . Doc Sawyer, way down deep, wishes he were a surgeon, 
and regrets Iieing obliged to teach a Inmch of "mugs" who know but little about 
the course . . . Fred Maliee was the first man to really predict trouble between 
China and Japan . . . That was his actual reason for leaving China . . . Paul Bart- 
lett is working on a theory of his own to the efifect that a man can do as much work 
wliile aslee]) as when awake ... So far he has only tried the former . . . Amos 
Hovey explains his perpetual daze thusly . . . According to the story he was taken 
unawares by a high powered steamroller, and ever since he has been trying to solve 
the riddle of the sphinx . . . Karl Woodcock actually believes that his home (the 
house that Karl built ) is the nicest in the County of Androscoggin . . . Apparently 
he has never been in either of the Parkers . . . Andy Myhrman has assumed his 
jjeculiar accent in order to attract members of the tantalizing sex . . . Such complete 
success must be merited . . . Brooks Quimby, who terms himself "just a Maine 
farmer", is frantically afraid people will really think so . . . Prof. Berkelman has 
just about reached the saturation point . . . His candid opinion of Bill Shakespeare 
is — "bunk" . . . But he must earn his bread and butter somehow ... So he pretends 
to admire the author . . . Percy Wilkins is l)eing bribed by Bowdoin . . . To teach 
Bates men, and to teach them wrong, so that our reputation will be lowered . . . 
Doc Fisher is madly in love, and expects to pop the question for the third time 
this week . . . Just another strong silent man . . . Ray Thompson will never forget 
that he once played against Harvard . . . His sons are enthusiastically bored with 
the story of the crash of the Stadium . . . Prof. Craft's secret ambition is to play 
the Zither . . . Too bad . . . Good old Paul Whitbeck . . . After much tedious 
endeavor, 1 have discovered that the reason for his dryness is a sad one ... It 
seems that there is drink in his family tree, and he is dry in order to make up for 
it . . Buck Spinks and his dog . . . Prof. Seward's hair . . . Unfortunately he once 
used an inferior grade of Henna . . . His hair has retained that eerie hue ever 
since . . . Stewart, at heart, is just a college boy, and is developing an enormous 
number of inhibitions because Prexy refuses to let him play with the boys . . . 
Angle Bertocci is a toughie from South Boston . . . Have you ever been to 
S. Boston, gentle reader? . . . He holds the lightweight boxing championship of 
B. U. . . . Leaves his hair long because he should have been a musician . . . Prof. 
Lewis, the young reprobate, is looking for a Trilby . . . He became a prof because 
he thought 'twould give him a way with les femmes . . . Such ambition . . . Such a 
method . . . Erich Labouvie isn't really an instructor . . . He is just a rosy-cheeked 
little boy playing make-believe . . . Imagine it . . . The monsters referred to above 
are the very people you see every day . . . No wonder they think I'm insane . . . 
They are coming after me ... I hope I finish my life story before they come . . . 
The most boring thing . . . Life stories . . . Do you like life stories? . . . Have you 
ever tried them fried in batter ? 



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PAGE TWO HUNDRED THIRTY-THREE 




THE _„ 




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PAGE TWO HUNDRED THIRTY -FOUR 




THE 



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932 



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of tl)E 

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PAGE TWO HUNDRED THIRTY-FIVE 




THE 



I V I I r^ r^ v^ r*C MmimMsm- 



932 




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djonipUments 
uf tlje 

Ollaaa of 1935 











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PAGE TWO HUNDRED THIRTY-SIX 




THE 



" IQ32 







TTie "Ve^itt ^otel 



'INCERE good wishes to the Graduates 
and Undergraduates of Bates College. 
We hope we may be helpful in arrang- 
ing and caring for your class dinners 
and other social events. 

Attractive private rooms and excellent dining service 
at moderate rates. We shall appreciate the privilege 
of serving the Bates Student Body. 




FRANKLIN E. HODGKINS 
c^^tlanaging T)irector 



Phone 4200 



(Compliments of 

Tufts Brothers 

FRED H. TUFTS — G. ROYAL TUFTS 



PRINTING 

SPECIALISTS 



RUBBER STAMP 
MANUFACTURERS 



QUALITY and SERVICE 



Telephone 29-W 



J 



udkins Laundry 



Incorporated 



FRED H. TUFTS, President 

G. ROYAL TUFTS, Vice-President 

GEORGE W. TUFTS, Manager and Treasurer 



193 Middle Street, Lewiston, Maine ^ AGENCY AT PARKER HALL 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED THIRTY-SEVEN 




THE 



IQ32 




? 



R. W. CLARK 



SruggiBt 



pliable 

Trompt 

aAccurate 

(Courteous 



243 Main Street, Lewiston, Maine 



THE 



Elm House 



AUBURN, MAINE 



Noted for its 


fine table 


service and a 


homelike 


atmosphere, a 


Hood place 


to eat, and a 


"Wonderful 


place to sleep 





W. E. LAWLESS, Proprietor 



c5l5 S^'^dents 
or cAlumni 



you are 
(Cordially 
Welcomed 
at the 



[e Store 



Compliments of 

'^herts Office Supply Qo. 

17 "Tarli Street 
Lewiston, (fMaine 

22,2, (^Middle Street, Tortland, oMe. 



IDedicaced to the Treservation of 
Visual Efficiency 

D. E. PLAISTED 

(iPptometriBt 

183 Main Street Lewiston, Maine 



OPPOSITK I»KCK- 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED THJRTY-EIGHT 




THE 

I =7 O -^ jouMx "n "lilfi \WtSt ■ ■ 






TRUSTEES DEMAND FIGURE ACHE 
GIVE BEAUTY, ECONOMY, AND P. T, 



PRESENT CONSTRUCTIVE PROGRAM OF SERPENTINE 

TRACKS FOR LONGER RIDE — CHRISTMAS SURPRISE 

FOR PRESIDENT — DEMAND SOUEELLESS CARS 




The Ross Track Plan for figure Aclics 

The Executive Board of the Androscoggin Electric Company met yesterdax' on the steps 
of the City Hall to consider the petition presented to it last January by the Board of Trustees 
of the local school at the juncture of College and Campus Avenue. The petition, stated in 
full below, was termed "a pretty piece of business" by one of the group who refuses to give 
his name, and it is thought that the matter will rest with this decision. The petition reads : 

To whom it may concern : 

We, the trustees of Bates College do hereby desire from the Androscoggin Electric Com- 
pany the following benefits — 

1. The immediate removal of the Figure 8 squeel as it rounds the turn on Cdllege Street. 
We have calculated that in lost sleep and nervous disturbance that raucous and pernicious 
noise has caused in the lowered efficiencv of President Gray the total loss to the college of 
a sum of money large enough to install a noiseless typewriter in the library and make other 
mucii needed improvements including five additional feet of barberr\- hedge. 

(Continued on page 241) 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED THIRTY-NINE 




THE 

IVI I 1^ r^ v^ r^ M,^ 

' ^ t 19 32 " '^ 



■Uf M ''it BtfihiiKMrt it 




Qompliments of 



Walton's Bakery 



++++++++++++++++++-J-+++ 




+++++jjjj.4^j^4.4.4.4.4..{.^^ 



Lewiston Trust 
Company 



"c5^ Complete 'Ranking 
Service ' ' 



V, 



LEWISTON 
MECHANIC FALLS 



LISBON FALLS 
FREEPORT 



'T^harmacy 



Where 
Bates 
Students 
Reign 



Luncheonette 

Sodas 
'T^rescriptions 



College and Sabattus Streets 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED FORTY 




'^^^p****" THE 

MIC^I^OR 

" " " I \^ -^ jL ' ' .<»iaii. -'111 'llli llfMf " ■■'*' 



i 




TRUSTEES DEMAND FIGURE ACHE 
GIVE BEAUTY, ECONOMY, AND P. T. 

(Continued from page 239) 



2. The inauguration of special week-end and round trip rates for Lewiston antl Auhurn 
students. Town girls must also have the privilege of obtaining this service for repeated 
trips of Bates gentlemen. 

The special rate will also be in efTect for the students of French Conversation and pro- 
fessors Bartlett and Crafts. 

3. Two reinforced steel special cars for use on the Freshman Ride. These cars shall 
also have wrought iron advertisement posters. Permanent souvenirs make contented fresh- 
men. 

4. A complete change in the art scheme of the cars to conform to the delicate stream 
lines of Chinese palnaquins. Professor Berkelman says that your present means of con- 
vevance "has all the beautv of a mud turtle on wheels, and shocks the supernal loveliness 
of the spring mornings". 

5. A reversal of direction ever\ other trip to counteract the Figure 8's vicious tendency 
to cause the Bates students to think one-direction thoughts. 

(Continued on page 244) 

Union Square Taxi Co. 



Stands 

Everywhere 

in the 

Two 

Cities 




24 

HOUR 
SERVICE 



Telephone 4040 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED FORTY-ONE 




MiSiloi^ 

" • IQ32 ' '^' - 



.44 :ii itfmiiMiniiM I' 




BARNSTONE-OSGOOD CO. 

"Diamond 
Q^erchants 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL WATCHES 

CLOCKS AND JEWELRY 

SINCE 1859 



50 Lisbon Street, Lewiston, Me. 
(Compliments of 

S. S. KRESGE CO. 

THE GREEN FRONT STORE 

120 Lisbon Street 

and 

THE RED FRONT STORE 

60 Lisbon Street 



LEWISTON, 



MAINE 



DORA CLARK TASH 



'T^hotographer 



125 Main Street Telephone 228 

LEWISTON, MAINE 



HARRY L PLUMMER 



Photographei 






Portraits — Commercial 
and Finishing 

STREET FLOOR — NEW STUDIO 
135 Main Street, Lewiston, Me. 

BERRY PAPER CO. 

49 Lisbon Street 
Lewiston, Maine 



=your StMioner= 



Every ^ates S^^dent likes our 

Ice Qream ! 

IsOe are always glad to 
Welcome you. 



Qeorge T<gs5, '03 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED FORTY-TWO 




THE 



Ik 






+4- 



Compliments of 



Turner Centre System, Inc- 



=^=^^^^^^^= T)istrihuton of =^=^=^=^ 

MILK CREAM-ICE CREAM 



AUBURN, MAINE *"\j) MINOT AVENUE 



-5-J- 

•{•+ 

4-t 

4-4" 

4-4- 
4-4- 
4'4< 






'*?'^''^^'**Z'**^*^*Z*^'**^**'**t'*^^!**I'*^*^*$*^^^^^''^'^^^^^^^^^^*S*^^^^*S*^^^*S*^^^''S*^^''S*^^^^^^^^^^ 



•1 



N selecting our Clothing we 
always have the College 
Men in mind. 



Suits and Topcoats 
for Spring from 

^23.50 

up 

We carry at all times a full line of 

Tuxedo and Full Dress Suits 

for sale and for hire. 

CRONIN & ROOT 

Sell Qood Clothes 
140 Lisbon Street Lewiston, Maine 



T 



HESE four years have 
passed quickly, and 
now we must part. 



We wish you "the best" as 
you graduate and enter the 
various fields of endeavor. 

Call on us when you visit 
your Alma Mater — We 
shall always remember you. 



'"^heSuality Shop" 



143 COLLEGE STREET 



t 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED FORTY-THREE 




Mimloi^ 

!Q32 






The characteristics that mark gentlemanly attire 
are evinced in all Benoit apparel 

FOR EIGHTEEN YEARS OUTFITTERS TO COLLEGE MEN 






Corner of Lisbon and Ash Streets 

»*•« •J* ♦J* •*« ♦J* ♦J* •J* ifj* ♦J* •J* ♦J* »J» *J* ♦J* •J* ♦?■• ♦?« •% A •?• ♦J* •*♦ •*• ♦'• •*« ♦% •*♦ •*♦ ♦*-• ♦% •% ♦% ♦*♦ -A ♦** •*♦ ♦'♦ «J» A A A ♦J* •J» ♦J* ♦*• •J» *■•■• ♦J* ♦'♦ ♦*♦ ♦** »*■• ^^ ^t ^» *?» «?» ^» ^t-tS* 

TRUSTEES DEMAND FIGURE ACHE 
GIVE BEAUTY, ECONOMY, AND P. T. 

(Continued from page 241) 



6. The Trustees submitted the above architect's drawing as a suggestion for tlie remodel- 
ing of Figure 8 service to become an aid in completing the proposed art scheme and in 
obviating the one-direction thought tendency. This suggestion was made by Mr. Xorman 
E. Ross, '22, as the most economical means of travel down Campus Avenue combining beaut>- 
of serpentine movement, and symbolical depth of philosophy, with a longer and more invig- 
orating ride. Professor Cutts offers assurance that P. T. credit will be given for no less 
that five such Figure Ache rides per week. Prof. Walmsley has also cooperated in the 
matter so that if such an innovation is made Bates women may take such sport for credit 
provided that training is followed and no nuts are eaten. "Let's go Figure Aching, girls!" 
she says. 

The Trustees deny absolutely the rumor tliat Mr. Ross first conceived the serpentine 
track idea when returning to the Campus after attending a down-town Fireman's Brawl in 
the earlv 1920's, and state that he is acting with usual good sense and careful consideration 
of the vital needs of the College. The Tnistees also make it clear that in as much as they 
spent much time in consideration of the Figure Ache problem they will consider it a potent 
rebuke if their ideas are not put into effect, and in such case will consider seriously the 
removal of the College to a more svmpathetic environment. The trustees hope that the 
innovations will be made before Christmas 1932, for the whole matter is in the nature of a 
surprise to President (jrav, the total work on the question having been done when he was 
on his last trip to Europe, and the group plans to present the completed project to him as a 
Christmas present. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED FORTY-FOUR 




""^ THE j^^v^ ■ 

Jill i932^^K ..::.^Mm^JLJaM 























THE BATES MIRROR 
1932 

nniKiTrn j or^i impi 




















at the office of 

Merri & Webber Company 

PRINTERS — PAPER RULERS 
BOOKBINDERS 

Nos. 95-99 Main Street, AUBURN, MAINE 












Specialists in High School and College Publications 




















• 













PAGE TWO HUNDRED FORTY-FIVE 




THE 



MIE^I^OI^ i^-jii 



J n 19 32 "" 



'.I ■tftHHiiii 




Howard 




Wesson 



New England's 
Largest College Annual 
Designers and Engravers 



Engravers for 
this Book 



HOWARD-WESSON CO 

Artists and Makers of 
Fi ne Printing Plates 

44 Portland Street (Printers Building) 

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

Telephone 3-7266 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED FORTY-SIX 




THE 

5 * M IQ32 " 



^^ in. 



The New While it is NEW! 

Peck's 



LEWISTON 



Colli 



said : 



"The finest small city department 
store is Peck's, Lewiston, Maine." 

We realize that only thru your 
hearty response to our efforts to be 
a really fine store — one that offers 
new, authentic fashions - merchan- 
dise that we can back with the Peck 
name and guarantee — has come 
such success as we have enjoyed in 
our 52 years of storekeeping. 

Peck's and Value have been synony- 
mous for 52 years. 



^e make our olvn Ice Qream 

Mellen T, Downing 



Confectioner and Qaterer 



63 Court Street Auburn, Maine 

Telephone I656-W 



HAMMOND BROS. 

photographers 



Tortraits and 
framing 



(^omviercial IcJork and 
cAraateur finishing 



138 LISBON STREET, LEWISTON, MAINE 



(Ifumpltmcuts nf 

Auburn 



109 MAIN STREET 



Dedicated 100% to Printing Service 

Yet Small Enough so that Bartlett Gets 
His Fingers In Every Job 

Bartlett Press 



Incorporated 

Where Main and Middle Streets Meet in Lewiston 
If You Can't Visit Us Just Ring 1130 



Central Optical Co. 

E. L. VINING, Proprietor 

Registered Optometrist 

WE FIT. MAKE AND REPAIR 
GLASSES 

26 Lisbon Street, Lewiston, Maine 

Telephone 339 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED FORTY-SEVEN 




Mimloi^ 

19 32 




THE SHAW BUSINESS COLLEGE 



PORTLAND, MAINE 



507^ CONGRESS STREET 

^=— ^=^ COURSES ^^—^— 
Business — Shorthand — Secretarial 

CATALOGUE ON REQUEST 



irTD 



GTf 



Best 

Always 

Therefore 
Entire 
^ Satisfaction ^ 

'^^memher the ^olks at ^ome — 

Your message, whatever the occasion, expressed 

in flowers or a cheery plant will be 

long remembered. 

QUALITY — DEPENDABILITY — AND A 
SERVICE FOR EVERY PURSE. 

't/!orists' 'telegraph IDelivery 

GEO. M. ROAK CO. 

80 Court Street, Auburn, Maine 



Wiseman Farms 



Ice Cream 



'The Old Fashioned Kind" 



LEWISTON, MAINE 




iRST Auburn Trust Company 



i*-> 






1... 



77 Years of Safe Banking 

Service 

A Dependable Bank with a 

long enviable record. 

BANK BY THE FALLS 

BRANCH IN NEW AUBURN 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED FORTY-EIGHT 




THE 






^1 




Complete Motor Car Maintenance 

Glass — Replacements 

Automobile Top, Roof and Upholstery Work 

Wood and Mechanical Work 

Duco — Refinishing 

Parking and Storage 



Wade & Dunton Carriage Co. 

29 PARK ST. Tel. 214 and 215 LEWISTON 



Compliments of 



Geo. V. Turgeon &^ Co. 



JEWELERS 



80 Lisbon Street Lewiston, Maine 

Sign of the Big Chime Clock 



DR. JOHN P. STANLEY 
DENTIST 

145 Lisbon Street LEWISTON, MAINE 

ROOMS 701-702 
MANUFACTURERS NATL BANK BLOG. 

DR. L. RAOUL LAFOND 
DENTIST 

198 Lisbon Street LEWISTON, MAINE 



PHONE 45 



>*♦;■■•;*•■»♦•;••*»*•**•; 






Seniors 



Your Subscription jCt'^4't\»v C&t'f''«^^i\'«^4' Expires this 
to the Wail^Ja ^mUlClil June- 

You will want to keep in touch with Bates as alumni — Renew your subscription 
to the livewire Bates newspaper. 

RATES, THREE DOLLARS PER YEAR IN ADVANCE 



Business Manager, A. J. Latham, Jr. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED FORTY-NINE 




■imliifBcMiliMililiiir 



THE ' ^m' "^m 

^1932 ^^.^m^Ji irifliWi 



A I' T o r, R A p T-r s 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED FIFTY 




THE 



MIC^I^OI^ 



932 




AUTOGRAPHS 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED FIFTY-ONE 




Mimloi^ 

i e I H932 




A V T f^ Cx R A F' H S 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED FIFTY-TWO